Courses

Fairhaven College Course Descriptions

Below you will find our current course descriptions.  Previous quarter course descriptions are also available by selecting the quarter and year you are searching for.  Electronic course descriptions are available back to winter 2009.  For information on days and times as well as location please visit ClassFinder.  To register for these classes log into Web4U. Important information about registration including deadlines and fees can be found on the Registrar's Office page.  For any questions about these course descriptions or for assistance with registration please call the Fairhaven College Office at 360-650-6680. For information on Fairhaven College Wait List Policies click here.

Fairhaven College Core Requirements:

Classes determined to satisfy a Fairhaven Core requirement will be identified using the following icons: 

Letter CRequired Core Music Note Humanities and the Expressive Arts II
Leaf iconScience and Our Place on the Planet II Human iconSociety and Individual II

Non-Fairhaven Students

Most Fairhaven classes open to all WWU students who meet the prerequisites in Phase II of registration.

FAIR 101A Intro Interdisciplinary Study Required Core

Credits: 1

Instructor: Blick

This class aims to introduce students to Fairhaven College resources, practices, processes and possibilities in their first quarter of enrollment in our program. Our class activities will include small group workshops, introductions to Fairhaven resources and people, community-based activities and individual advising. We will introduce the educational practices used at Fairhaven (Writing Portfolio; Transition Conference; Independent Study, Interdisciplinary Concentration, Narrative Evaluations...) and share the essentials you need to proceed toward your chosen major and take charge of your education. Texts: There are no textbooks. Course materials provided in class and on Canvas. Credit/Evaluation: This Fairhaven College Core Class is a graduation requirement. Award of credit will be based on documented attendance, participation and completion of assignments as indicated in the class syllabus. Bring your your curiosity, your questions and your active engagement. The learning outcomes for FAIR 101a include understanding resources, degree pathways, requirements and pedagogy that are the mission and practice at Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies

FAIR 201A Critical & Reflective Inquiry Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Herring

The Food, Energy, Climate Nexus: Global Solutions for a Sustainable Future

In this course, students will develop an integrated understanding of the global food production system, its energy requirements and cumulative effect on the world's climate and, in turn, how our global food system is being impacted by those changes. Through reading, seminar discussions, student-centered inquiry, and the development of a research question, ultimately leading to a research paper. Students will build an understanding of the challenges we face while also carrying out a critical interrogation the current narratives that are promoted by the media, governments and corporations with a primary stake in these issues. We will explore proposed solutions, including the "Green New Deal" and examine how we can be active participants in positive change.

Text: Grassroots Rising: A Call to Action on Climate, Farming, Food and a Green New Deal, Chelsea Green Publishing, ISBN 1603589759, 2020.

FAIR 201A Critical & Reflective Inquiry Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Simon

Information Dystopia

Not long ago, “fake news” was a sarcastic self-reference used by purveyors of biting political satire and media criticism on a comedy channel. In 2016, “fake news” took on a new connotation: false stories disseminated to purposefully disinform the public for fun and profit, with social networks the medium, and the levers of national power the stakes. Politicians in power began to deride legitimate reporting and verifiable fact as “fake news” in order to delegitimize bad news about themselves. Political commentators have claimed that we live in a “post-fact” reality – that verifiable facts are no longer relevant to those who seek power or to the public, and that journalists, long the safeguards of the free and accurate flow of information that is the life’s blood of democracy, are powerless to demand them.

What happened? In this course, we’ll develop tools for discerning fact from opinion. We'll look the differences between legitimate persuasion, where facts and evidence are presented logically, and propaganda, in which communicators use sophisticated psychological techniques to manipulate viewers, readers, listeners, and scrollers into doing their bidding. We’ll learn to recognize, resist, defang, and debunk this type of message when we see it in any medium – and to communicate effectively, ourselves, with writing practice that uses logic and evidence to get our own ideas across honestly, and with power. Consider it Defense Against the Dark Arts.

FAIR 202A Core: Humanities/Express Arts Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Friedland

Living Archives

I collect the life of my time. I am interested in the history of the soul. --Svetlana Alexievich

In this course we will diverge from more traditional literary examples of the memoir or biography, and think about life writing as a community practice as well as literary works rooted in site specific, documentary and testimonial approaches. How does the gesture of listening to and writing of someone else's life story challenge our own perceptions, foster collaboration, and deepen empathy? How might we approach any story that is not our own? How do we begin to interpret the existing archive, the absent archive? We will begin with our own more personal storylines before moving beyond the classroom and investigate local histories and sites. You will be asked to work collaboratively and also in experiential learning modes. In addition, there will be multiple guest speakers presenting their own creative approaches to archival work and community engaged art practice. At the end of the course, you will present your work as part of a final project presentation, in the form of a panel, exhibit or reading.

FAIR 203A Social Relationshp/Responsibil Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Calderon

Critical Indigenous Studies This course explores key themes and ideas that have been developed within the area of study referenced as Critical Indigenous studies. Collectively, concepts of sovereignty, Indigenous self-determination, epistemology/ways of being, amongst others, are explored in relationship to the nation-state, citizenship, and empire. Some of the major contributions by Indigenous scholars we will cover include settler colonialism, survivance, Native feminisims, by scholars such as Sarah Deer, Jodi Byrd, Eve Tuck, Glen Coulthard, and Lourdes Alberto. Through this course, students will engage with Indigenous informed thinking that will be useful to consider current issues related to the environment, activism, education, and other issues impacting Indigenous communities. Texts will included selected readings from Eve Tuck and Wayne Yang's article, Decolonization is not a metaphor, Glen Coulthard, Red Skins, White Masks, Sarah Deer's The Beginning and the End of Rape: Confronting Sexual Violence in Native America, Margo Tamez's The Texas-Mexico border wall and Ndй memory" in the book Beyond Walls and Cages: Prisons, Borders, and Global Crisis (2012), and other selected chapters and articles. Credit/Evaluation: Regular attendance, engaged/active participation in all class exercises, engagement in class discussion, strong evidence of reading, quality performance assignments throughout the quarter, quality of writing.

FAIR 203A Social Relationshp/Responsibil Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Gutierrez Najera

Theme: Borders and Boundaries This class provides an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the formation, maintenance and endurance of borders and boundaries. It asks: What are borders? What purpose do borders serve? Why do they endure? Since there is no single agreed upon definition of "borders" we explore three main dimensions of borders as symbolic, geopolitical and cultural boundaries. In so doing we analyze their multiple dimensions as territorial entities, legal demarcations, institutions, sites and symbols of power, racial and ethnic boundaries, liminal spaces, and metaphorical constructs. As we gain deeper understanding we will see that borders, no matter what form they may take, are used to separate nations, people, spaces, in such a way that difference is imbued with power. Course readings engage scholars from multiple disciplines including anthropology, geography, history, political science and sociology, with cases studies from around the globe including Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, and the U.S. Foundational readings (available on Canvas) include scholarship by Frederik Barth, Hastings Donnan and Thomas M. Wilson, Roxanne Doty, Michelle Lamont, Joseph Nevins, and Dan Rabinowitz.

FAIR 206A Core:Science/Our Plc on Planet Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Bower

The Lives of Birds In this field course, we will study ornithology, the science of birds, in several different ways. In the classroom, we will learn to identify common local birds, and then we'll take field trips to forests, wetlands, and the Salish Sea to meet them in person. While in the field we will ponder just what the lives of birds are all about. Are they machines, mindlessly doing what their DNA tells them to, or are they thinking entities negotiating complex social lives? What are their family lives like? And what about love and aggression in the bird world? In the classroom, we will examine key concepts in evolutionary theory, ecology, and animal behavior by focusing on a few of the studies of birds that have contributed to our understanding of these concepts. Finally, we will do some research ourselves by participating in collaborative research projects conceived, designed, and conducted by the students in the class. Through all these means, we will deepen our understanding of how science works in the real world versus in the artificial world of many science classrooms.

Texts: Jonathan Weiner, THE BEAK OF THE FINCH; Fred Bodsworth, LAST OF THE CURLEWS; and Roger Tory Peterson, PETERSON'S GUIDE TO THE BIRDS OF WESTERN NORTH AMERICA, 4th edition. Credit/evaluation: Attendance, informed participation in discussion, participation in field trips, several short writing assignments, a field journal, developing the ability to identify roughly thirty bird species, and participation in field research projects resulting in two drafts of a scientific paper and a class presentation.

FAIR 210A World Issues

Credits: 5

Instructor: Akinrinade

Description: We are citizens of the world. As global citizens, what do we know and understand about global issues and ourselves in a world faced with complex issues, such as growing economic disparities, fragile democracies, environmental degradation, wars and militarism, civil liberties, racial profiling, and globalization? How do we become intelligently informed? What is our awareness of and participation in local and global efforts for positive social change? This course explores the complex dynamics of our globalized world from a holistic, inter-disciplinary, and transnational perspective. Together we examine multiple world issues, such as global inequality and poverty, food security, human rights, water, energy, population growth, migration, cultural change, and public health, and our individual and community roles as agents of social change on local and global levels. This course is connected to the Wednesday World Issues Forum speaker series. Credit/Evaluation: Attendance (required); preparation for class; respectful, engaged participation in class; reading and speaker reflections; a final summary essay, and a social justice action. There will be no course credit for anyone who misses three (3) classes in the quarter. Course Text: INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL POLITICS by Lamy, Steven; et al.; (2018); selected readings for each speaker on Canvas.

FAIR 245 Theory/Structure in Pop Music

Credits: 4

Instructor: Sehman

This course will examine the fundamental concepts of music theory, including reading and writing musical notation, scales, intervals, triads, chord progressions, and musical structure. We will then take the crucial next step of applying theory, to understand how those techniques are used in context to create meaningful, expressive music. We will analyze songs in different styles and genres, chosen by both the instructor and students. The sheet music for these songs will be used as a means for analysis, to better understand the music theory and songwriting techniques used. Through analysis, written responses and discussion of songs, students will be encouraged to refine their ability to clearly and effectively communicate their ideas about music. Focus will also be given to the larger cultural context the songs and artists we examine exist within. A song has many internal structures and meanings. But importantly a song also looks outward, interacting with the culture it exists within. And this is fundamental to our understanding of that music. The goal of this course is to enrich our understanding of the music we interact with, whether it be as listeners, performers or songwriters. No experience with music theory or reading music notation is required. Text: Principles of Music, by Philip Lambert (Oxford University Press) Requirements/Evaluation: Students will be expected to complete all reading and listening assignments, and participate in class discussion that arise from these. There are will also be weekly music theory assignments. Students will analyze and present at least one song to the class during the quarter. Evaluation will be based on successful completion of material and active involvement.

FAIR 246 Mariachi Music/Perform&Culture

Credits: 3

Instructor: Miyake

This course is repeatable for up to a total of twelve (12) credits. Ever since its establishment as a centerpiece of Mexican popular culture in the first half of the 20th century, Mariachi music has acted both as a central expression of Mexican identity and also as one of the most widely recognized representations of Mexican people and culture for those outside of this community. Students in this class will explore this cultural and artistic movement through both academic engagement and hands-on experience in creating this music themselves. Class meetings will include sessions in which we will discuss academic and popular texts on Mariachi music and culture as well as participating in discussions with guest speakers and performers, and sessions in which class members will learn to perform Mariachi music in both individual and ensemble formats. No experience in performing Mariachi music is required for this class- all instruction and expected musical collaborations will be designed to fit the experience level of each individual student. Required Texts: Wade, Bonnie C. Thinking Musically: Experiencing Music, Expressing Culture. 3rd ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 2013. Sheehy, Daniel Edward. Mariachi Music in America: Experiencing Music, Expressing Culture. New York: Oxford University Press, 2006. Texts for this course will also include other articles, book chapters, and music as assigned by the instructor. NB: Alternate readings will be provided for students who have already received credit for this course in an earlier quarter Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will take account of regular attendance, evidence of critical reading, engagement in class discussion and completion of assignments.

FAIR 255Y Folk Music Experience

Credits: 2

Instructor: Bower

This course combines playing and singing folk music with the study of the contexts in which folk music has evolved. For this quarter, the course will focus on the contemporary folk music scene - that is, the music being written and performed today. Students will be expected to participate in discussions on readings assigned during the first five weeks of the course. The class will choose several tunes to practice together over the course of the quarter. In addition, each student will also be asked to introduce one song to the class that enriches our knowledge of folk music or the context within which folk music has been written and performed. We will encourage that these songs come from the contemporary folk music scene. Students will write a short research paper that forms the basis for their presentation on the song and its context. Students will also be responsible for learning and practicing the songs that are presented to the class, including practice in small groups. Students are encouraged to gain practice at playing one or more folk music instruments during the course and are invited to join the course even if they are beginners at playing an instrument or if they prefer to just sing.

Texts: There will be no one text for this course - readings will be assigned from a variety of sources.

Credit/Evaluation: Regular attendance and participation in our weekly sing, informed participation in class discussions, one short research paper and song presentation, and practicing music in a small group.

FAIR 270H Intro to Audio Recording

Credits: 4

Instructor: Wallace

Introduction to Audio explores the techniques, tools, and technology used in multi-track recording. From a beginner's perspective, this course follows the recording process starting with the tracking session, then the overdub session, and through the mix-down session. By examining the various pieces of the recording process students will learn the concepts and skills necessary to use studio equipment such as microphones (their characteristics and placement), mixing consoles (explained in detail), multi-track recorders (analog and digital), patch bays, signal and effect processors, headphone systems, and multi-track punching and bouncing. Each student is also expected to attend a weekly two-hour small group lab, held in the studio, giving the student a chance to experience multi-track recording in a hands-on manner. A detailed manual will be provided to each student so that each concept will be encountered first in an assigned reading, then in lab, and finally in the class meetings. Texts: THE RECORDING ENGINEER'S HANDBOOK (3rd edition) by Owsinski and the Fairhaven Recording Studio Lab Manual. The lab manual text will be provided by the instructor and paid for with lab fees. Credit/Evaluation: Students will be evaluated through a combination of participation, attendance (lab and lecture), research projects, and understanding gained from the material evaluated from a hands-on assessment. Additionally, students will be required to complete a creative project with the instructor in the studio as a final project.

FAIR 303A Core:Intrdisc Cncntrtn Sem Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Spira

Prerequisites: FAIR 101A, FAIR 201A, FAIR 203A, FAIR 305A What questions do you want to explore in your Interdisciplinary Concentration? (Are you asking questions, for example, about inequalities, ecology, musical cultures, or performance?) Why are these questions important enough intellectually, politically, socially or professionally to form the basis for your Interdisciplinary Concentration? Your challenge in the Concentration Seminar is a two- or three-fold one. First, you must answer the question of why your concentration matters to your own satisfaction. Second, you want to communicate the reasons why your concentration's questions matter to the mythical "average reader" in your rationale. Third, you must identify the set of courses, independent study projects, internships, or other forms of experiential learning that allow you to explore your underlying questions about your subject in the rest of your time at Fairhaven College. In practical terms, the seminar is designed to assist you with your development and writing of an interdisciplinary concentration. It will serve as a forum for discussion, guidance, and support during the proposal writing process. You will work collaboratively with your seminar, your instructor, and your concentration committee, to write your learning proposal and identify relevant courses and experiences to help you achieve your educational goals. Here are some of the practical questions this seminar will help to address: - What are the appropriate guidelines and requirements involved? - What exactly is it you want to achieve in your degree? - How can your intentions be given effective shape and form? - Who should be on your committee? - How do the parts of your concentration work together conceptually? - What are the best vehicles for your learning? - What should you put in and what should you leave out of your concentration? Text: Handbook on Canvas + Occasional Readings distributed in class Credit/Evaluation: Faithful preparation for and attendance at seminar; Steady work on your proposal; Contributions to the development of your group members' proposals. Credit for the course is granted when your completed committee-approved proposal has been filed with the Fairhaven Records Office and a regular self-evaluation form is submitted to the instructor.

FAIR 305A Writing & Transition Conferenc Required Core

Credits: 3

Instructor: Schwandt

The Writing Portfolio and Transition Conference are Core graduation requirements for all Fairhaven College students. Your Writing Portfolio will be a selective collection of your academic writing and an introductory statement of self-assessment about your writing at this point in your education. It will be reviewed and assessed by your Fairhaven faculty advisor. Your Transition Conference is a constructive mid-point conversation with advising resource people you invite to share your educational plans and collect advice officially moving you from the "Exploratory" stage of Fairhaven's program into the "Concentrated" stage of your educational plans, regardless of your choice of major. You should embark on these requirements when you and your faculty advisor agree you're ready for them. This is not a class, however you must attend one orientation meeting early in the quarter. Details about the orientation meeting schedule will be sent to all enrolled students via email and posted on the FAIR 305A class CANVAS site. In order to receive credit for FAIR 305A you must: 1) Submit your Writing Portfolio prepared according to specifications to be provided at our orientation and on our class Canvas site. 2) Schedule and conduct a Transition Conference which includes writing and circulating a Transition Conference Statement to your invited participants prior to the conference. Additional details and instructions will be provided at our orientation and on our class Canvas site.

FAIR 311B The American Legal System Society and Individual 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Helling

Course Description: An in-depth look at the American legal system and how it affects individuals and society, with coverage of legal vocabulary, sources of law, the structure of the government, the Supreme Court and the judicial system. We will focus on the structure and evolving nature of the legal system, legal reasoning and the role of courts in government. Case analysis skills will be stressed, including identifying the issue, procedural history, facts, reasoning and holding of each case. We will particularly examine issues of affirmative action in school admissions to explore lines of precedent. Students will also engage in a mock trial. Texts:Class Manual of case readings prepared by Instructor and Any legal dictionary (Barron's is recommended)

Credit and Evaluation:No more than THREE absences will be allowed if you want credit for this class. Active and informed class participation will be expected. Assignments will include oral presentations on Supreme Court Justices, weekly case briefs and worksheets, an 8-10 page research paper, and satisfactory participation in the mock trial.

FAIR 312 DIY Music Business Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Sehman

The music business has undergone staggering changes in recent years due to changing technologies, and the collapse of many of the old gatekeepers, corporations and power structures. Funding, production, promotion and distribution have largely become the artist's responsibility. While this has democratized creative music making in exciting and powerful ways, it has also placed new responsibilities on the independent artist. This course will begin with an examination of the traditional aspects of music business, including: Copyright, royalties, distribution, licensing, publishing and record contracts. We will follow that with an extensive study of the new DIY music business. We will look at the practical methods and skills required of today's musician, including: Direct engagement with listeners, creating an effective online presence, promotion, contacting media, booking shows, and successful methods for releasing and distributing recorded music. We will also examine the complex social and artistic issues that are a result of changes in the music business, such as: Copyright and ownership in the digital age; the (de)commodification of recorded music; power structures between corporations and the independent artist. Our dialogue surrounding the above topics will be based on the writing of experts in the field, the shared knowledge and experience of class members, and case studies/analysis of current artists and their innovative and creative methods in music business. *All students are welcome to participate in this course, whether they are an active musician or are simply interested in the state of the current music business. Texts: Herstand, Ari. How to Make it in the Music Business: Practical Tips on Building a Loyal Following and Making a Living as a Musician. Liveright, 2016. Passman, Donald. All You Need to Know About the Music Business. 9th ed., Free Press, 2015. Requirements/Evaluation: Students will be expected to complete readings and viewings for each class meeting, and actively participate in the resulting discussions. There will also be written reflections on select topics and readings. Students will complete a music business/entrepreneurship project on a topic of their choosing, which they will present to the class.

FAIR 314E Critical Pedagogy Society and Individual 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Pierce

In this course we will draw from empirical research to examine the social, political, economic, and historical context of schooling for students of color in U.S. K-12 and higher educational systems. Students will be introduced to a set of ethnic studies concepts and theories from which to better understand the educational experiences and realities of historically underrepresented students. The course will also challenge students to reflect on their educational experiences and the schooling conditions of students of color in general, and to apply the concepts introduced in class to their own educational experiences. More specifically, the course is intended to enable students to: 1)Develop an understanding of the histories, concepts, perspectives, and theories used to examine the complex realities of historically underrepresented students; 2)Articulate their understanding of concepts such as privilege, microagressions, institutional racism, whiteness, resistance, decolonization, and activism, and apply these concepts to their personal educational experiences and to the debate over educational (under)achievement, (in)equity, and the politics of education; 3)Engage in inter-ethnic/racial dialogues about race and racism, the use of power and privilege to institutionalize inequity, methods for achieving social and educational change. Texts: Pedagogy of the Oppressed, Teaching to Transgress. other Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will take account of regular attendance, evidence of critical reading, engagement in class discussion, and completion of assignments.

FAIR 319B Critical Race Theory Society and Individual 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Calderon

Theme: Critical Race Theory Throughout American history, race has shaped the lives of individuals, social and political institutions, as well as the cultural climate of the nation. This impact has been mediated through the law and legal institutions. Critical Race Theory (CRT) in the law examines the interconnections between race and law, and particularly the ways in which race and law are mutually constitutive. This course will pursue this project by exploring themes within CRT. Through this class we will study the role of law as historically central to and complicit in upholding racial hierarchy. We will focus on the origins of the critique and the contrasts between CRT and liberal and conservative analytical frameworks on race and American Law and society. The point of departure for the course is an exploration of race itself and the role law plays in constructing this identity. Course readings will be taken from both classic works of Critical Race Theory and newer interventions in the field. Credit/Evaluation: Regular attendance, engaged/active participation in all class exercises, engagement in class discussion, strong evidence of reading, quality performance on assignments throughout the quarter, quality of writing. Required Text: CRITICAL RACE THEORY BY CRENSHAW, KIMBERLE, GOTANDA, NEIL, AND PELLER, GARRY

FAIR 319E Music Jrnlsm & Cultural Crtism Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Simon

FAIR 336B Disordered Eating & Weight Bias Society and Individual 2

Credits: 5

FAIR 336B (De)Constructing Drag Society and Individual 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Delucio

Description: The world of drag is becoming increasingly mainstream. Over the past five years, the vernacular of the community has been adopted, and appropriated, by television shows (e.g., Broad City) and websites (e.g., Buzzfeed), and the language has also found its way into branding and clothing. The increasing awareness and popularity of drag is no doubt influenced by the emergence of the television show RuPaul's Drag Race, which debuted in 2009. While the show finds ways to honor the roots of drag within the LGBTQ community, it is not without its problems, including issues with transphobia, treatment of contestants, and verbalizing limits on what drag is and/or can be. The goal for this course is to dive into the richness of drag culture, and questioning how much we all participate in some form of drag through our daily lives (e.g., performing certain gender roles). We will explore the history of the culture, drag as activism, its impact on LGBTQ social movements, media representations, gender and race considerations, and queer futurities in relation to drag. We will create a space of critique around the mainstream rise of drag and its impact on the art. As a final project for the course, we will collaborate to produce a drag show reflecting what we have learned through the quarter and embodying where we see drag going in the future.

Required Texts: TBD Criteria for Evaluation: Regular attendance (i.e., no more than 3 absences); active and engaged participation in class discussions and activities; a research paper examining an aspect of drag culture; collaboration in producing an end-of-quarter drag show

FAIR 336B Outback and Food Justice Society and Individual 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Pierce

Food justice has become an important concept and movement both in the U.S. and across the globe. In its most general sense, food justice in the U.S. is a social and political movement led by working class communities and communities of color to take control of their own food production and distribution. Moving away from the industrial, corporate driven food system that is built on and perpetuates racial, economic, and gender inequality, food justice movements work to promote access to healthy and affordable food for the most vulnerable and exploited communities. But what does food justice mean in the context of WWU's campus and for Fairhaven College? More specifically, what might food justice projects look like created by Fairhaven students in the Outback Farm? This five credit course is designed as a praxis oriented class to provide students with the opportunity to create, experiment, and generally think of ways the Outback Farm can be a site of food justice practice and link to food justice movements in Bellingham and the region. Student Learning Outcomes: -Learning principles of food justice praxis from existing research literature -Experience with design and implementation of food justice project in the Outback Farm -Experience researching local food justice projects/organizations -Identifying food justice needs on campus Student Evaluation: Participation in class discussion and regular attendance; Timely and thoughtful completion of course readings and writing assignments; quality of writing assignments that use evidence from course readings; quality of reflection projects; critical and respectful engagement in class Course Texts: All course readings will be provided on Canvas as PDF. Students are required to print out and bring hard copies of readings for the corresponding class meeting.

FAIR 336B Race in/to the Movies 2 Society and Individual 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Takagi

Cinematic stereotyped images of racial minorities, such as the "Cunning Chinese" and "Befuddled Blacks," are not as prevalent nor as blatant in films produced nowadays as they were in earlier years...or are they? We will answer this question by viewing and critically analyzing popular films, reading texts about American race relations, and exploring how movies both framed and distorted the discourse between the dominant society and racial minorities between 1950 and 1980. Texts: Harry M. Benshoff and Sean Griffin, America On Film, 2009 Articles on Canvas Written requirements: 1.Eight scene analysis papers 350 words each. 2.Research or Comparative Paper OR Videographic essay. You have the choice of writing either a paper that is an in-depth examination that compares two of the films shown over the quarter or a paper based on a film of your choice. This paper is 5-7 pages long. Typed, double-spaced. Alternatively, you can produce a videographic essay on a film(s) that must be a polished edited film of 8 minutes. There will be workshops given during the quarter to help you learn how to edit film.

 

FAIR 336B The Arts as Therapy Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 4

This course explores arts therapies of visual art, music, drama, dance and poetry. Arts therapies are based on the concept that the use of imagination and creative expression is essential to health and well-being. Most arts therapists believe that the capacity for healing through arts stems from personal insights and guidance one gains from participating in a creative processes. Historically, the arts have long been used as a healing modality. Some key questions we explore in this course are: What are the creative arts therapies? How do they engage the mind, body and spirit? How have these therapies evolved? What have they become in our current culture and where have they found effective use? How does one become certified in an arts therapy? What challenges do arts therapists experience? To guide the learning process, this course uses text and article readings, videos, class experiences and discussions, and presentations by certified arts therapists or practitioners. Course Learning Objectives >to explore various art therapies including music, visual arts, poetry, story, drama, dance and integrated/expressive arts therapy >to examine the creative process and its relationship to health and wellness through personal experience and observations of others >to understand how peoples have developed and are using the arts to heal and gain critical personal insights Course Requirements Fairhaven 202a or equivalent. No arts courses or skills are required. To gain greater understanding of arts as therapy, this course involves some experiential elements. Students taking this course should be comfortable and/or willing to explore their own creativity and experience arts therapy practices in a group setting. This course is not designed to provide therapeutic interventions or to resolve personal issues. Additionally, the course does not provide a certification to practice arts therapies, but does offer information about how one becomes a certified practitioner. Required Texts Integrating the Arts in Therapy: History, Theory, and Practice by Shaun McNiff, 2009; Expressive Therapies edited by Cathy A. Malchiodi, The Guildford Press, 2005 Additional article and journal readings will be provided electronically. Credit/Evaluation: Reliable attendance and active involvement are key requirements in this course. Students will be asked to complete the following demonstrations of learning: 1.complete all assigned readings 2.participate in class activities and experiential arts therapy demonstrations 3.write a response to experiential sessions 4.research, write and present to the class about a specific arts therapy, technique or related area of interest

FAIR 336B Queering Family Society and Individual 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Spira

To answer death with utopian futurity .... is a queer thing to do. - Alexis Pauline Gumbs,

As the recent separation of migrant children from their caretakers has so painfully dramatized, the right to reproduce family according to one's wishes--and thus nurture future generations--is a privilege that US empire seeks to systematically deny from many. Indeed, the annals of US history are replete with examples of this, from Native American boarding schools; to attacks upon Black motherhood under slavery and beyond; to custody battles facing queer moms in 1970s and 1980s; to current day debates over who is a suitable parent within the foster care system. And yet, communities persist, "answering death with utopian futurity," to quote Alexis Pauline Gumbs through the very "queer" act of lovingly kindling futures and nurturing generations. Taking on the rubric of "queering family," this course examines entwined cases through which communities have asserted their right to reproduce family in a multitude of forms. Exploring the aforementioned histories and more, we will ask what it has meant to "queer" family as a both deeply intimate and political act to nurture generations and lay claim on the future.

Texts (Selected) Briggs, Laura, Somebody?s Children: The Politics of Transracial and Transnational Adoption, Durham: Duke University Press, 2012. Caballero, Martnez-Vu et al eds. The Chicana Motherwork Anthology: Porque sin madres no hay revoluciуn, Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2018. Gumbs, Alexis Pauline, Revolutionary Mothering: Love on the Frontlines, Oakland: PM Press, 2017. Moraga, Cherre, Waiting on the Wings: A Portrait of Queer Motherhood, Boston: Firebrand Books, 1997. Ross, Loretta and Rickie Solinger, Reproductive Justice: An Introduction, Berkeley: University of California Press, 2017.

Assessment Students will be required to attend every class meeting and actively participate in discussion. Required assignments include four reading responses and one class facilitation. The central assignment will be a research paper that students will develop throughout the term, including a prospectus. Finally, students will be required to provide thoughtful and substantive review of peers' research proposals.

 

FAIR 336H Embodied Performance Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Nichols

This intro to the healing power of theater is an experiential learning and performance based class. Utilizing our body, faces, interactive gestures, and our personal stories, we will create stories with-out words, but rather with physical dynamics. Understanding presence through physical postures, we will explore how much we communicate non-verbally. Many of the questions our class will explore are: What is it to animate? What is it to express? Why does movement communicate? What can be communicated and understood without words, but the body alone? How can enacting our stories be healing, through being witnessed, heard and felt? How does our face and eyes play a roll in all of these above questions? And what and why are microaggressions important? Our conversations and performances will include issues of social justice, gender binaries, and marginalized experiences. Along with this experiential learning we will explore an interdisciplinary and cross cultural perspective of physical theater. A specific interest of mine will be the use of theater in the prison system, "for example, Ground Up Rising". Looking at several different programs and their effects on the people both in the plays as well as the audience. Through a variety of articles, books, and videos we will explore the leaders in this field and the science of non verbal body to body communication. Required Texts: Sepinuk, T, Theater of Witness: Finding the medicine in stories of suffering, transformation, and peace. Callery, D Through The Body: A practical Guide to Physical Theater. Moni Yakim. Creating Character: A physical Approach to Acting Credit/Evaluation: Regular and on time attendance, informed and engaged discussion, reading, completion of all assignments; three personal reflection pieces, one research based paper, two individual performances, two collaborative performances, one school play. These performances will be done with out words.

FAIR 336N Wild Foods Science and Our Place on the Planet 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Hahn

For thousands of years the First Nations of the northwest, including the Coast Salish, ate via a "seasonal round" from the bountiful shellfish, salmon, camas, berries, seaweed, and greens. What were these foods? Where did they grow? How did they contribute to human and ecosystem health? How were wild foods managed for sustainability? What ethics did people apply to gathering, processing and eating wild food? In this course we will explore northwest native flora and fauna in the context of “wild food” across time, cultures, and ecosystems. Our class time will be a combination of outdoor explorations in the Salish Sea watershed and indoor discussions based on readings, films, guest lectures. You will learn to identify, sustainably forage, process and prepare a variety of wild foods with a modern twist via two feasts we make together with wild food. We will also look at indigenous traditional food culture against the backdrop of Colonial settlement, industrialization and agriculture. How did Indigenous food cultures and Settler food cultures--interface and impact one another? What factors have contributed to the loss and degradation of Indigenous food wisdom and wild foods over the last 150 years? Today, many wild foods are threatened due to the introduction of invasive species, contaminants, climate change, and the loss of traditional ecological knowledge of how to use these foods. How can we reimagine a more vibrant, contemporary Salish Sea wild food culture--informed by Western science, traditional ecological knowledge/science, and local knowledge keepers--that promotes connection, reciprocity, community and individual health, and biodiversity?

TEXTS: Handouts, on-line papers, and two REQUIRED BOOKS: (1) THE EARTH'S BLANKET: Traditional Teachings for Sustainable Living by Nancy J. Turner, University of Washington Press; (2) BRAIDING SWEETGRASS: Indigenous Wisdom, Scientific Knowledge and the Teachings of Plants by Robin Wall Kimmerer, Milkweed Editions, 2015. TWO OPTIONAL TEXTS: (1) PACIFIC FEAST: A Cook's Guide to Coastal Foraging and Cuisine by Jennifer Hahn, Mountaineers/Skipstone Press, Fall 2010; (2) PLANTS OF THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST COAST (any edition is fine) by Andy Mackinnon, Jim Pojar, et al. Lone Pine Publishing.

CREDIT/EVALUATION: Students are required to: participate in class discussions and have regular class attendance;  write 4 critical reading pieces (2 pages each, based on readings, to prompt deep discussion); complete two hands-on projects: A) a wild food harvesting/cooking project (eg., legally/sustainably gather/process nettles for pesto and share with class) and B) build and use an earthen pit fire for roasting root vegetables; and, last: compile a 10-page minimum “verbatim research paper” on a wild food species;  present a 15-20 minute "Final Project" based on the latter research (past projects include writing a children's story on nettles; creating wild harvesting songs for kids; designing an interactive computer model for state parks on wild food; designing seaweed ID/harvesting cards, etc).

Outdoor excursions during our course time will occur several times a month, plus 1 field trip to Ebey State Park for Seaweed ID, Ecology, Cuisine on Whidbey Island May 8 (Fri) or May 10 (Sun/Mother’s Day). Details on assignments will be given in class.

FAIR 336N Brain Science Science and Our Place on the Planet 2

Credits: 4

Brain Science

What is going on in our brain as we go through our daily tasks? How does our brain change throughout our life? How and when do our brains differ from one another? What effect does stress and environmental elements have on our brain? Is the brain hardwired for morality? What part of the brain promotes a sense of self? Or spirituality? Participants will discover answers to these and other questions in this exploration of brain structures and functions and correlating behavior patterns. We will examine the mechanisms of thinking, learning, planning and emotions. Through current neuroscience understanding, we will learn about the essential chemical messengers that communicate within the brain and body. We will discover how our environment, diseases and disorders affect our brain. We will find out how neuroplasticity allows us to change and compensate for alterations in our brain and body systems. Throughout the quarter we will investigate essentials of brain health. Students can expect to learn through presentations, discussions, reading/media and interactive instructional strategies that promote active student involvement using brain-based learning methodologies. Learning outcomes are that students will be able to: -identify brain structures and their functions -understand primary chemical brain messengers and the functions they fulfill for human behavior, actions and emotions -learn how disorders and disease affect the brain/body -recognize how differences in brain structures and chemistry manifest and how neuroplasticity adapts the brain to changes. Course Materials: Readings from a current neuroscience text and related book chapters plus assignments from The Anatomy of the Human Brain by John P.J. Pinel. In-class and assigned videos / podcasts. Credit/Evaluation: This course requires active participation in class and full attendance as well as completion of periodic responses to readings/media and individual research with a class presentation.

FAIR 336V Conceptual Strategies in Art Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Hartshorne

In this course students will explore various approaches to contemporary art-making for use as inspiration in creating their own work. Through a series of art making exercises students will develop ideas and concepts that link to their interests, including but not limited to: personal stories, identity, activism, and culturally relevant topics. Students will be expected to experiment and take creative risks in an attempt to answer this question: "What is the most effective way to creatively execute my idea through art making?" Through discussion and the study of contemporary art-making, students will begin to understand different strategies for making and the creative process. Initial art making projects will be given as creative challenges and will culminate into a larger project where students will hone in on a specific art-making strategy. Students will be exposed to text-based art, activist and protest art, as well as art dealing with contemporary cultural issues to provide inspiration and possible directions for their own work. Students will be required to keep a sketchbook to facilitate the flow of their own expression and ideas. Textbook: none, but required readings will be made available. Credit and Evaluation: Students will be evaluated based upon their commitment to their projects, regular and punctual attendance, active and informed participation in class discussions and workshops, and the timely completion of all projects, sketchbook, and required readings and assignments. Students are expected to challenge themselves both creatively and intellectually. An open-mind and enthusiasm for your work is essential for successful completion of this class. S/U grading.

FAIR 336V Emotive Politics of Dress Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: S'eiltin

Prerequisits: Basic Sewing and Design or an intermediate sewing class or studio art class COURSE DESCRIPTION: Because clothing is a medium for fashioning identities from commodities, it is hardly surprising that political and social tensions are embodied in its fabrications. The emotive politics of dress indicates an inseparable link between sartorial practice and political significance, as demonstrated in debates about the role of clothing in colonialism's "civilizing" mission, "traditional" Indigenous peoples' dress and body fashions, immigrant and "third world" sweatshop labor and globalization. Clearly present throughout these politics is the role of gender, race, nation, sexuality, and cultural representation as they relate to power and continuance in accessing "human and other rights." This course examines the discourses, political and economic conditions, and institutional formations that have produced the subjects of fashion as tradition-bound "others" in need of liberation or "modernization," as "productive" and self-governing subjects embodying modernity, as cosmopolitan citizens of the world, and as the labor for transnational capitalism. We will focus on both the historical and cultural development of fashion, clothing and consumption in the West and other location throughout the globe. Topics will include dress as a site of political contest, design as a locus of industry and ideology as well as aesthetics, and manufacture at the intersection of transnational circuits of labor, bodies, and capital.

FAIR 336V Documentary Film Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 5

Directing Documentary Film The recent expansion of digital media has made video production skills increasingly relevant in today's workforce. This course will guide students with basic knowledge of video production through the fundamental steps of making a documentary film. The best way to learn how to make a film is to make one. Throughout this course, students will develop their own documentary films on a subject of their choice. In the process they will get a better understanding of genre, story structure, cinematic language, camera and lighting techniques, interviewing, editing and audio post-production.

The course will explore what great documentary filmmakers have done in the past and how the new-school of documentary filmmakers in the digital age differs. We will analyze documentaries from a variety of styles and genres, from feature-length political, sports and music documentaries, to short form industrial and advocacy videos. We will watch gonzo journalism, personal memoirs and fly-on-the-wall cinema verite, and attempt to draw inspiration from what documentary filmmakers have done in the past. Instructor Biography: Jordan Riber comes to this course as a filmmaker with a great deal of hands-on experience. He has spent the last 15 years making films and television programs in Tanzania. His projects have been screened around the world and won awards at numerous festivals. Jordan is excited to share some of the most important lessons that he has learned over the years with students.

FAIR 343U Embodied Leadership

Credits: 4

Instructor: Nichols

Description: The academic foundations of the Embodied Leadership class emerge from our increasingly complex interdependent global system and a new movement of leadership philosophy, activity, and research. Leadership skills are required to meet the challenging multiplicity of shifting power structures, social complexity, and community demands. This class will investigate the literature and research to help clarify and define the new leadership movement, a defining element of which is described in Scientific American Mind September 2007; "Power and charisma aren't enough. The best leaders guide groups from within." The embodiment of "guiding within" is central to our course inquiry, offering new leadership skills to equip the new leaders responding to this collective need This class will both define and experientially explore these new skills, some of which are: diversity training, social justice, compassion, empathy, social and emotional intelligence, understanding the well being of the group, and complex problem solving. Through literature, lecture, and experiential activities we will clarify and understand leadership and through experiential learning we will build the felt sense of embodied leadership in action. Through the body we will develop the acumen, sensitivity, and creativity to work with diverse group dynamics. Text: Your body is your brain by Amanda Blake, Emergent Strategy by Adrienne M. Brown and a range of published literature available through canvas. Credit/Evaluation: Demonstration of learning will include consistent and regular attendance, in-class participation, and fulfillment of reading assignments. Three integration papers will track the student's intellectual understanding. Also utilizing both qualitative and quantitative objectives and assessments, each student will design a leadership project for themselves to share with others, and a final personal presentation topic your choice.

FAIR 370I Introduction to Pro Tools

Credits: 4

Instructor: Wallace

Prerequisites: 270H (before or during) or permission of instructor

Intro to Pro Tools builds off of knowledge gained in the Intro to Audio course regarding the use of basic audio recording equipment, such as mixing consoles, compressors, equalizers, and other outboard processors. Students will take this knowledge and apply it to the digital realm while learning the specifics of recording audio and MIDI, editing, and mixing using Avid's Pro Tools software. Covered topics will include: importing and recording audio into Pro Tools, editing and manipulating performances, MIDI, the use of plug-ins, and an overview of mixing processes such as compression/limiting and equalization. Students will be expected to attend class regularly and demonstrate critical listening skills through critique of their classmates' work. Additionally, the Fairhaven Mixing Suite and Fairhaven Recording Studio, as well as the Miller Hall computer lab will be available for use all quarter and required for certain projects. Texts: Reprinted materials. Credit/Evaluation: Projects will be evaluated throughout the quarter by the instructor.

FAIR 370J Studio Recording

Credits: 4

Instructor: Fish

Prerequisite: FAIR 370I or FAIR 370P Studio Recording I takes the concepts introduced in Intro to Audio and Intro to Pro Tools and allows the student to apply and practice them in a hands-on manner, with the goal of becoming familiar with and competent in the use of the equipment in the Champion St Studio. Students will complete at least four multi-track recording projects and will have the opportunity to work on other recording sessions as well. Through the students' work on these projects they will learn efficiency and speed in the techniques of tracking, overdubbing, and mixdown sessions. The recording projects will be evaluated by the instructor as well as the other students in the class. This course will also involve development of critical listening skills as well as the creative and imaginative expression possible in audio recording. Students will keep a detailed journal of their session work. This is a Pro Tools based course and enrolled students will gain access to the Fairhaven Studio, Mixing Suite, and Champion St Studios. Texts: The Recording Engineer's handbook (3rd edition) by Owsinski Credit/Evaluation: Each student must finish the assigned projects which will be critiqued by the instructor and peers based on sound quality, balance, clarity and realization. Overall evaluation will be made based on effort, participation and growth as an engineer.

FAIR 370K Advanced Studio Recording

Credits: 4

Instructor: Fish

Prerequisite: FAIR 370J or FAIR 370H This class will give students with advanced recording experience the opportunity to record and mix on an industry standard Pro Tools 12 HD system. Students will enhance their knowledge of Pro Tools and learn how to use this software in conjunction with a large-format analog mixing console. Topics such as drum sample replacement, audio quantization, convolution impulse responses, spectrum analysis, DSP processing and other advanced topics will be covered. Students will be expected to conduct at least three recording/mixing sessions throughout the quarter and prepare a final portfolio for in-class critique. Students will also learn how to properly configure Pro Tools HD hardware and software components, how to setup session templates and how to utilize each component of an HD/analog system. Enrolled students will gain access to the Fairhaven Studio, Mixing Suite, and Champion St Studios. Texts: Reprinted materials Credit/Evaluation: Projects will be evaluated throughout the quarter by the instructor and the other

FAIR 372F Race-Soc./Latino Caribbean

Credits: 4

Instructor: Estrada

Populations from the Spanish speaking sectors of the Caribbean Basin (Cuba, Puerto Rico, the Dominican Republic) constitute one of the fastest growing populations within the United States. In conjunction with existing Latinx communities and immigrants coming from Mexico and other parts of Latin America they are literally transforming and rejuvenating many U.S. communities and cities. More and more the Caribbean is increasingly becoming a critical area of study and interest to researchers, academicians, theorists and others who wish to understand the historical fusion and growing nexus between the Latin@ Caribe and U.S. society. The normalization of relations between Cuba and the United States under the Obama administration speeded this process considerably, while retrenchment to previous hegemonic, international policy and isolationism has so far marked the tone of the Trump strategy toward Latin America and the Caribbean region. The purpose of the course is to examine the past and present context of how race and cultural fusion have been experienced among peoples in and from the Latin@ Caribe. Particular emphasis will be placed on the various ways in which racial/cultural identities are complicated by questions of gender, class and sexuality both in the Caribbean as well as those Latin@ Caribe populations residing in the United States.

As an interdisciplinary course it will introduce students to the richness and diversity of the Latin@ Caribe cultures as well as the region's turbulent history of conquest and colonization along with contemporary problems related to economic development, democratic reform and interracial conflict. Themes included within the course will focus on immigration, U.S. hegemonic politics and the Caribbean, social/racial stratification within the Caribbean, cultural syncretism, as well as national/regional identity. The course will utilize many different kinds of materials throughout the quarter inclusive of primary and secondary texts, fiction, art, video, and music to familiarize students with the vitality of the Caribbean and Latin American artistic expression history, life, and culture.

FAIR 377 Music in Film Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Sehman

The expressive and narrative power of music has been joined with dramatic theatrical forms for centuries (Japanese Noh theatre, European opera), and has been intimately linked with filmmaking from the beginning of that medium's development in the early 20th century. This course will examine the central role music plays in the interdisciplinary medium of filmmaking, ranging from the live musical accompaniment of silent films, to the epic modern action scores of Hans Zimmer. Through analysis of various films, their music, and the unified artwork they create, we will attempt to better understand how music is used as a powerful expressive tool in filmmaking. Topics will include: -A historical overview of the evolution of film music over the 20th and 21st centuries. -Analysis of specific compositional techniques, to better understand the link between music and dramatic expression: How do film composers create tension, release, sorrow, ecstasy with music? How do composers use leitmotif to link musical themes to specific characters? How do composers use orchestration techniques and timbre to amplify the emotional or narrative context of a film? -Examination of concepts and terminology associated with film scoring, such as: spotting, cues, free timing vs. click track, diegetic vs. non-diegetic music, composing under dialogue, dead hits. -Place film scores into a larger musical-historical context, for example: -Note how the 19th century Romantic orchestral tradition has served as the model for traditional film scoring, from Max Steiner's Gone With the Wind, to John Williams' Star Wars. -Note the use of avant-garde and experimental musical styles in films such as Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey (the music of experimental Hungarian composer Gyorgy Ligeti) -Examine the use of pre-existing pop songs in films, as a way to tap the cultural and historical zeitgeist (Oliver Stone's soundtrack to Platoon); or to utilize the cultural capital of certain songs and artists (the coveted and expensive licensing of a Beatles song). -An examination of film music outside the American tradition; notably Indian Bollywood film and music and the Italian Western. Text: Mervyn Cooke- A History of Film Music (Cambridge University Press) Requirements/Evaluation: Film viewings will occur both in and out of class. As well, students will be expected to listen outside of class to examples of film music (for in-class analysis and discussion). -Students will also complete readings from various sources pertaining to specific films, film scoring techniques and film composers. -A final project will include scoring some short film scenes. (Students can either write music or use pre-existing music; no musical experience is required.) -This course is for anyone with an interest in better understanding how films and film music work, and can also serve as a foundation for those interested in pursuing film scoring.

FAIR 384J Writing Nature Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Tag

The earth is not a mere fragment of dead history, stratum upon stratum like the leaves of a book, to be studied by geologists and antiquaries chiefly, but living poetry like the leaves of a tree, which precede flowers and fruit--not a fossil earth, but a living earth.--Henry David Thoreau We will explore the writing of nature, the nature of writing, nature's ways of writing, the writer's nature, the literary genre of nature writing, and what it means to be creatures of nature who write. The paths we will follow (or make) will be shaped by our readings, our writing, our discussions, our field excursions, and the continued presence of oxygen, water, earth, and sunlight (without which no course, nor university for that matter, would be possible). This is primarily a writing course, but each of you may also "write" nature through other mediums: drawing, painting, mapmaking, collecting, photography, song, recording, walking, and perhaps even cooking and eating. The point is to experiment with what it means to write nature, and to explore the limitations and illuminations other mediums bring to language and words. 

Texts: Henry D. Thoreau, The Journal of Henry David Thoreau, 1837-1861; Camille T. Dungy, ed., Black Nature: Four Centuries of African American Nature Poetry; Helen Macdonald, H is for Hawk. Credit/Evaluation: Faithful attendance and presence. Completion of readings and weekly writing assignments, as well as a journal, a series of poems, a personal essay, and a final project.

FAIR 386E Nonverbal Communications

Credits: 4

Instructor: Coulet du Gard

Description Based in sociolinguistics, symbolism, and communications studies, this course focuses on topics of nonverbal communications. Human communication is both verbal as well as nonverbal. Humans have found innumerable ways of communicating -and miscommunicating. In today's society, with prevalence of cell phone texting and non-video communications online, many individuals are spending increasing amounts of time with the written word (albeit shortened formats.) Our species has spent most of its time in communicating via multiple channels (use of various signals and symbols.)

We will be analyzing the power of symbolism and intuition; communications field methodology; principles of and factors relating to kinesics (body language); oculesics (eye movement); haptics (touching), and proxemics (space use.) Gender and cultural variations will also be explored along with universal microexpressions. Expect in-class sessions exploring nonverbal communications by exercises in small group and large group exploration. Films will also provide beneficial context for analyzing nonverbal expressions. In addition, students will be required to complete several small and one major observation or research project. Texts A number of documents, articles, videos and graphics will be posted in Canvas, including Gregory Bateson's work on metamessages; Edward T. Hall's silent language, Deborah Tannen's sociolinguistic work on 'genderlect,' Paul Eckman's work on microexpressions; Karl Jung and others on symbolism; and intuition as a type of intelligence and communications. Credit/Evaluation Regular attendance with no more than three absences; preparation of readings and active participation in demonstrations of nonverbal expression; in-class writing assignments; leadership of discussion or demonstration; and an individual or joint observation project based on field work for the course. Prerequisites Fair 202a or equivalent

FAIR 387K Grant Writing Workshop

Credits: 4

Instructor: Coulet du Gard

Focuses on the basics of grant writing, including researching and seeking funding sources; reading and interpreting funding guidelines; developing and refining proposals, and tricks of the trade. Development of individual grant proposal required. Do you think of writing grants as begging for money? Do you have fears around money? This workshop will help you think of grant writing in a different way. Learning to prepare a good proposal allows you to help granting agencies find a way to spend the dollars they are required to spend to meet their own missions, either legislative or for tax related. You need the money. They need to spend it. Your challenge is to find a match between your need and theirs, and to persuasively articulate that match. In this workshop you will learn the basics of writing proposals to funding agencies, including how to find appropriate funding sources, how to read and interpret funding guidelines, funding restrictions, the steps for developing and refining proposals, including the budget. It is highly recommended you have identified a project and/or an agency before the course begins. Texts and Materials: 1.Tori O'Neal WINNING GRANTS STEP BY STEP, 2013 fourth ed. 2.Cheryl A. Clarke Storytelling ?for Grantseekers 2009 3.Levine ONLINE: Guide to Writing a Funding Proposal, S. Joseph Levine at Michigan State University, http://www.learnerassociates.net/proposal/ 4. Canvas: other assigned readings: various web sources, documents and worksheets. Credit/Evaluation: Participants will be expected to develop a grant request (LOI) and a full grant proposal to a foundation or other source of funding by the end of the course. These proposals might be directed toward funding your own work, or might be related to the work of a community non-profit agency. Attendance is critical. Evaluation will be based on participation in class writing exercises on a regular basis, the quality of feedback given in peer reviews, and the quality of the final proposals. I keep a log on attendance, participation, and required writing

FAIR 393B Rights,Liberties,Justice in Am Society and Individual 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Lopez

The past is never dead. It is not even past. (William Faulkner, Requiem for a Nun, Act I, Scene III) This five-credit interdisciplinary seminar engages students in the processes of critical and reflective thinking, reading and writing. It is a place to explore what these processes are, why they are valued, how they work, and where they fit into a Fairhaven education. This class is a Constitutional Law class. We will read the Federalist papers and the Magna Carta to understand the beginnings of our legal system. We will dissect the US Constitution and learn its structure, federal powers, individual liberty, Due Process and Equal Protection clauses, first amendment speech, religion, and privacy. In the process we will discuss contemporary issues and cases as they are informed by prior cases. Required Texts:

Constitutional Law: Principles and Policies, Fifth Edition. Erwin Chemerinsky. Selected Federalist Papers. Dover Thrift Editions 2001. Alexander Hamilton and James Madison. Other online materials are assigned.

Learning Objectives: -Students explore the foundation documents in the formation of the structure of government in the U.S. -Continue to practice and learn about case reading and case briefing -Expand knowledge of and practice legal research and writing, including APA citation -Explore themes of Rights, Liberties, & Justice historically and in the present time -Understand the connection between the Constitution of the US, case law, and ordinary life -Foster independent researchers and engaged learners -Continued familiarity with how courts use precedent -Practice oral presentations and public speaking -Strengthen critical and analytical skills

FAIR 397C Migrant Farmworkers & Food Justice

Credits: 4

Instructor: Gutierrez Najera

Student-taught course by Sage Fairman.

We live in a county that ranks in the top three percent of farm production in all of the US. Researcher Teresa Mares states that "across the U.S. food system... it is the immigrant worker who feeds the nation". From dairy to berries, farm workers and migrant farm labor play a large role in how we get our food. This course will look at farm worker and immigrant justice: frameworks that highlight migrant farm worker's rights to improve their living and working conditions, along with access to health, safety, and sovereignty.

How does farm worker justice play a role in the current industrial agriculture system? How can a food justice framework create space for resilience and cross-cultural connection for migrant farm workers in the US? And lastly, what action can we, as students, take to address issues of injustice within local communities? This course will examine the history of migrant farm labor in the US from the lenses of health, immigration policy, and agricultural practices. It will also take an experiential learning approach through visiting farms, attending farm worker-focused events, and learning what local organizations are doing to fight for farm worker justice. The main goals of this course are to conceptualize migrant farm labor in today's context and to apply our knowledge as a group to a critical action by the end of the quarter.

FAIR 397E Critical Internet Studies

Credits: 4

Instructor: Spira

Student-taught class by Daniel Wallach.

This interdisciplinary class provides students who have interests in activism and organizing work the tool set to critically engage with the digital spaces that they already inhabit. We will interact with scholarship from critical race studies, media studies, cultural criticism, futurist movements, and contemporary geopolitical events to work towards a way of critically navigating the ever-intensifying flood of messages we receive on a daily basis in the internet age. Our work will center the individual student's history and relationship with internet technology as a site of identity construction in order to confront national and global cyberpolitical concerns. In examining our own relationships with the digital world, we will ask ourselves: How have interactions with technology defined my life? How do my online social networks define the kind of news and information I receive? How is the fabric of my reality shaped by these networks? What are the systems of power that dictate how the internet is organized and upheld? How am I performing labor on the internet? Do I have a feeling of "ownership" over the cyberspaces I inhabit? How do I make sure myself and my community are confident in the security of their data? Working outwards from our personal relationships with these technologies, we will examine the societal concerns that the internet has brought upon the world. We will ask: How do we define truth in an era of "fake news" hysteria? How do we historicize our moment of far-right radicalization via online content platforms that cause horrible acts of violence. Are privately owned platforms like Facebook unhealthy for our Democracy? How can we use the internet in our mass-movements? What cultural knowledge systems can offer a glimpse into a better future? We will read testimonials, frameworks, and histories from writers of marginalized subjectivities that have been directly affected by and are engaged in the work of understanding the political construction of social media and the internet. Together, we will undertake a process of critical literacy that we can carry out of the classroom to be educators in our movements, families, and communities.

FAIR 403A Advanced Seminar Required Core

Credits: 4

Instructor: Delucio

ANNE TREAT, Spring 2007 grad, said: "There is no possible way I can give justice to the complexity of experiences, triumphs, pitfalls and challenges of my academic career in the course of this paper. This artifact of self-reflection is simply a pause in the broader conversation of my academic journey, an invitation for me to mindfully articulate the ways those things I've studied, read, discussed and experienced over the past four years have informed and challenged my personal development, and how I've chosen to integrate and express that knowledge through the actions of my life" This seminar is a wonderful opportunity to reflect on what you have been up to all these years of being educated--through writing, conversation, presentations, and listening to each other. You will read and discuss a book and other readings, co-facilitating at least one discussion; write and share a variety of short writing assignments, designed to help you complete your Summary and Evaluation, and provide a supportive community in which to summarize and critically reflect upon your Fairhaven (or Life) education. Each student will also present or teach something to the class from the heart of his or her educational experience. This course is one of our favorites to teach at Fairhaven because we learn so much about our students, and the many intriguing, complex, deep, creative and quirky ways there are to be human and to become educated. The class also illustrates the value of writing as a process of discovery, synthesis and meaning. We will all do our best to help you express most clearly what your education has been about, and are honored to learn from your stories, your minds, your creativity, and your lives. The course will be as significant as you make it. Be honest. It is your life, your education, so let us understand what it has meant and what it really means to you now.

FAIR 403A Advanced Seminar Required Core

Credits: 4

Instructor: Blick

ANNE TREAT, Spring 2007 grad, said: "There is no possible way I can give justice to the complexity of experiences, triumphs, pitfalls and challenges of my academic career in the course of this paper. This artifact of self-reflection is simply a pause in the broader conversation of my academic journey, an invitation for me to mindfully articulate the ways those things I've studied, read, discussed and experienced over the past four years have informed and challenged my personal development, and how I've chosen to integrate and express that knowledge through the actions of my life" This seminar is a wonderful opportunity to reflect on what you have been up to all these years of being educated--through writing, conversation, presentations, and listening to each other. You will read and discuss a book and other readings, co-facilitating at least one discussion; write and share a variety of short writing assignments, designed to help you complete your Summary and Evaluation, and provide a supportive community in which to summarize and critically reflect upon your Fairhaven (or Life) education. Each student will also present or teach something to the class from the heart of his or her educational experience. This course is one of our favorites to teach at Fairhaven because we learn so much about our students, and the many intriguing, complex, deep, creative and quirky ways there are to be human and to become educated. The class also illustrates the value of writing as a process of discovery, synthesis and meaning. We will all do our best to help you express most clearly what your education has been about, and are honored to learn from your stories, your minds, your creativity, and your lives. The course will be as significant as you make it. Be honest. It is your life, your education, so let us understand what it has meant and what it really means to you now.

FAIR 403A Advanced Seminar Required Core

Credits: 4

Instructor: Tag

This class offers you a wonderful opportunity to reflect on what it is you have been up to in all these years of being educated--through writing, conversation, presentations, and listening to each other. We will read and discuss a book together, write and share five 2-3 page reflections, and provide a supportive community in which to write the Summary and Evaluation of our Fairhaven (and sometimes Life) education. Each of us will also present or teach something to the class from the heart of our educational experience. This is my favorite course to teach at Fairhaven, for it is the one in which I learn most about my students, and of the many intriguing, complex, deep and quirky ways there are to be human beings. It is also a demonstration of the value of writing as a means to discovery, synthesis, and meaning. I will do my best to help you express best what your education has been all about. It is an honor for me to learn so much from your stories, your minds, and your lives. This course can be as significant to you as you are willing to make it. Be honest. It is your life, your education. Come join us and let us glimpse something of what your educational journey has really meant to you.

Text: To be determined. Credit / Evaluation: Faithful attendance, active participation in our discussions, workshops, and presentations, completion of five 2-3 page reflection essays, reading one book, giving a 50-minute presentation to the class, writing at least two drafts of your Summary & Evaluation, and getting your S&E approved by your Concentration Committee members or Fairhaven advisor.

FAIR 403A Advanced Seminar Required Core

Credits: 4

Instructor: Akinrinade

Subject: This course, in your final quarter at Fairhaven College, provides an opportunity for reflection on your education. The class provides a supportive community for the summary and critical reflection process, whether you pursued a WWU major or a Fairhaven concentration. The final output will be a Summary and Evaluation (S & E) of your Fairhaven education. Through this S & E, you will reflect on your educational choices and their consequences, identify unifying trends, articulate the meaning of significant ideas and experiences, and note the gaps that remain. The course offers time to look forward, consider possibilities and challenges of your chosen community and/or occupation, and to examine questions of social responsibility and activism in relation to your education and future aspirations. This course is a collaborative effort, involving intensive writing, continuous conversation, presentations and active listening to each other. Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will take account of regular attendance, engagement in class discussions and active collaboration in the Summary and Evaluation writing process, and a Summary and Evaluation document submitted at the end of the quarter. There will be no course credit for anyone who misses three (3) classes in the quarter. Text: Hilberg, Raul: The Politics of Memory: The Journey of a Holocaust Historian (1996)

FAIR 412E Adv Topics: Mock Trial

Credits: 5

Instructor: Helling

Texts: Fundamental Trial Advocacy (Second Edition) by Charles H. Rose III

Prerequisites: Fairhaven 311b American Legal System OR Poli Sci 311 Intro to Judicial Process (OR permission of instructor).

Description: This is a study of the law of evidence and trials skills such as opening statements, direct and cross-examination, objections, and closing arguments. Legal analysis skills will be stressed in determining which evidence in a case is relevant and how to get the evidence admitted. Effective public presentation skills will be stressed.

The final project is having students participate in full mock trials with a jury and judge (every student will serve as an attorney and a witness in different mock trials).

There will be four weekly class hours plus one arranged while you are observing actual court and meeting with your team and mentors.

Requirements: Regular and punctual attendance required (no more than 3 absences if you want to get credit).

Weekly trial exercises, extensive mock trial preparation, and two papers required.

 

FAIR 436N Adv Topics in Science: Agroecology and Permaculture Planning Science and Our Place on the Planet 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Kempton

Agroecology is an environmentally-intense, albeit necessary, human activity. Come investigate the intersection of farming and ecology in this hands-on planning and practicum course! The quarter will focus on developing a permaculture plan for a 5-acre plot that we visit together to test, sample, investigate, and discuss. Topics include soils, seed (both practical and political aspects), land use planning, water management, regenerative agriculture, and mitigating climate change. We will keep a running discussion of food justice, decolonizing permaculture, and social evolution as we go. Classes include field trips to a berry farm, dairy, sustainable fishery, and established permaculture homestead - as well as time spent in the Outback directly engaging in farm activities. Student narrative evaluations will assess class participation, completion of homework readings and written assignments, and final farm plan project and presentation.