Courses

Fairhaven College Course Descriptions

Below you will find our current course descriptions.  Previous quarter course descriptions are also available by selecting the quarter and year you are searching for.  Electronic course descriptions are available back to winter 2009.  For information on days and times as well as location please visit Classfinder.  To register for these classes log into Web4U. Important information about registration including deadlines and fees can be found on the Registrar's Office page.  For any questions about these course descriptions or for assistance with registration please call the Fairhaven College Office at 360-650-6680. For information on Fairhaven College Wait List Policies click here.

Fairhaven College Core Requirements:

Classes determined to satisfy a Fairhaven Core requirement will be identified using the following icons: 

Letter CRequired Core Music Note Humanities and the Expressive Arts II
Leaf iconScience and Our Place on the Planet II Human iconSociety and Individual II

Non-Fairhaven Students

Most Fairhaven classes open to all WWU students who meet the prerequisites in Phase II of registration.

FAIR 101A Intro Interdisciplinary Study Required Core

Credits: 1

Instructor: McClure

This class aims to introduce students to Fairhaven College resources, practices, processes and possibilities in their first quarter of enrollment in our program. Our class activities will include small group workshops, introductions to Fairhaven resources and people, community-based activities and individual advising. We will introduce the educational practices used at Fairhaven (Writing Portfolio; Transition Conference; Independent Study, Interdisciplinary Concentration, Narrative Evaluations...) and share the essentials you need to proceed toward your chosen major and take charge of your education.

Texts: There are no textbooks. Course materials provided in class and on Canvas. Credit/Evaluation: This Fairhaven College Core Class is a graduation requirement. Award of credit will be based on documented attendance, participation and completion of assignments as indicated in the class syllabus. Bring your your curiosity, your questions and your active engagement. The learning outcomes for FAIR 101a include understanding resources, degree pathways, requirements and pedagogy that are the mission and practice at Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies.

FAIR 201A Critical & Reflective Inquiry Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Takagi

Journeys In this section we will explore the different kinds of journeys Americans have been taking over the centuries, and how they make sense of those life travels, through texts, films and through class discussion. In addition, we will embark on an intellectual journey, which will include developing and honing the skills, tools and knowledge to be a strong student and a productive, responsible member of the larger community. For each class member, this part of the journey will include identifying and analyzing one's voice and the privileges and burdens built into that voice, identifying and analyzing others' voices and building respect for those diverse perspectives, and to critically assess all forms of information (oral, written and visual).

The main skill emphasized in this class will be writing. During the quarter you will sharpen and hone your writing skills. You will learn to construct an argument, gather evidence, shape your thesis to fit the audience, and organize your thoughts. In addition, you will also learn to seminar, peer edit papers, and critically analyze materials. Finally, you will learn to research and write a 6-8 page research paper with a minimum of 4 sources, proper citations and a bibliography.

Required Reading: Readings on Canvas and on-line through library database Additional requirements: Regular attendance. 2 absences will reflect negatively on your evaluation. 3 absences and you will not receive credit for the class. If there is a personal/family difficulty, please let me know as soon as possible. Active participation in class and small group discussions. If you are uncomfortable with speaking in front of people, please see me as soon as possible. Peer editing of writing plan. Paper requirements: One biographical journey paper (2-3 pages, double-spaced) + proper citation. One critical analysis (2 pages, double-spaced) + proper citation. One reflection paper (2 pages, double-spaced) + proper citation. One reflection paper (1-2 pages, double-spaced) no citations needed. One synthesis paper (2 pages, double-spaced) + proper citation. One research paper topic (1 page, double-spaced). One Draft of Research paper (rough draft 6-8 pages) OR 3-4 pages well polished portion of the research paper. Double-spaced + proper citation. Final version of research paper (6-8 pages, double-spaced) + proper citations. Writing plan for your e-portfolio draft and final version.

FAIR 202A Core: Humanities/Express Arts Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Friedland

FAIR 203A Social Relationshp/Responsibil Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Estrada

Social Identity:
This section will explore the process of social identity formation in the United States through the lens of modern social theory. The goal of the class is to explore multiple perspectives on the formation of the state, individual rights within society, equality as well as the roles and responsibilities of individuals within their respective communities. The focus of the class will concern itself with the roots and application of Western ideals of freedom and equity that arguably form the basis for the United States’ liberal democracy. The seminar will outline the origins of the enlightenment and the basis for “natural” rights and freedoms in conjunction with the derived roles of society and government. We will then examine how the universalist ideals of the liberal enlightenment have implicitly or explicitly excluded those without property, people of color and women. We will also define what the “social compact” has meant in different periods of American history, and the relationship of various groups to this compact. Can liberal democracy really provide equal citizenship for workers, women and people of color? How have the movements of socialism, reconstruction, decolonization, ethnic identity and feminism tried to reformulate and transform the social order?
 
Texts: SELECTED READINGS on John Locke and Adam Smith; C.Lemert, 4th ed., SOCIAL THEORY:THE MULTICULTURAL &CLASSIC READINGS (Jackson, TN: Perseus Books, 2010); M.J. Sandel, JUSTICE: WHAT’S THE RIGHT THING TO DO (NY: Farrar, Strauss, Giroux, 2009); Recommended Reading: Zinn, H. PEOPLE’S HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES: 1492-PRESENT, (NY: Harper Collins, 2003)

Credit/Evaluation: Credit will be granted for regular attendance, evidence of preparation, satisfactory completion of 2-3 written perspective papers in addition to a group term project and class group presentation. Criteria for evaluation include informed and active engagement in class discussions; informative, relevant group presentation and a term project paper that illustrates a sound grasp of social theory and critical paradigms.
 

 

FAIR 203A Social Relationshp/Responsibil Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Gutierrez Najera

Citizenship Beyond the Legal Markers This course takes a critical approach to understanding the idea of citizenship. While citizenship is a powerful marker for inclusion, it tends to rely on legal categorization critical to determining the distribution of and access to rights and resources. Yet a world characterized by increasing flows of displaced people, points to the limits of relying on purely legal markers for citizenship. In this class we consider the limitations of citizenship as a legal category bound to nation-states and explore other possibilities to think through ways in which membership is created. In so doing, we consider the following: What is citizenship and how did this idea emerge? What is a nation and what does it mean to belong to it? How are exclusion and inclusion embedded in notions of citizenship? How do race, ethnicity, class, gender, and sexuality shape the granting of citizenship? How do minoritized groups challenge the limits of inclusion within nation-states? How has global mobility shaped by neoliberal economics challenged states' abilities to regulate citizenship? How does this mobility produce new forms of citizenship and belonging? In addressing these questions and others, we will become familiar with a foundation of critical social theories and their applications for understanding citizenship from multiple perspectives. This class will be conducted in a combination seminar format focusing on a detailed discussion of the required texts. Foundational readings (available on Canvas, unless a required book) include scholarship by Hannah Arendt, Benedict Anderson, Linda Basch, Seyla Benhabib, Stephen Castles, Nicholas De Genova, Nina Glick-Schiller, Miranda Joseph, Mae Ngai, Aihwa Ong, Renato Rosaldo, and Audra Simpson. Required Texts: Richard Bellamy (2008), A Very Short Introduction to Citizenship; Seyla Behnabib (2004), The Rights of Others: Aliens, Residents, and Citizens; Audra Simpson (2014), Mohawk Interruptus: Political Life Across the Borders of Settler States.

Credit/Evaluation: Students are expected to be active discussion participants and co-facilitators throughout the term. Course assignments and requirements include regular participation and attendance, submission of critical questions for discussion, reading journals, a short essay assignment, a final paper, and a narrative self-evaluation.

FAIR 206A Core:Science/Our Plc on Planet Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Tuxill

Course Description: How much do you know about where your food comes from? Growing and raising food is the single most important human activity affecting our planet's ecosystems, with enormous environmental, economic, and social consequences. How we manage the ecological relationships inherent in modern food production plays a crucial role in determining the health of ourselves, the natural world, and society. This course focuses on agro-ecology: the science of how to produce food in ecologically sustainable ways. We will learn about how soil, water, plants, animals, fungi and microbes interact within ecosystems as a foundation for supporting healthy, productive agriculture. Along the way we will examine and evaluate specific topics of relevance for an ecologically healthy and socially just food supply, including organic certification, permaculture, genetically modified organisms, agriculture's role in climate change, the 'eat local' movement, and sustainable food systems. Outdoor investigations at the Outback campus farm and additional field studies will provide opportunities to get our hands dirty and learn firsthand the challenges and rewards of growing our own food. Texts: Readings will be made available on Canvas. Credit/Evaluation: Participate in all classroom and field activities, including outdoor labs at the Outback campus farm; complete a mid-term essay exam; and write a 5-page research paper accompanied by a final classroom presentation.

FAIR 210A World Issues

Credits: 5

Instructor: Akinrinade

Description: We are citizens of the world. As global citizens, what do we know and understand about global issues and ourselves in a world faced with complex issues, such as growing economic disparities, fragile democracies, environmental degradation, wars and militarism, civil liberties, racial profiling, and globalization? How do we become intelligently informed? What is our awareness of and participation in local and global efforts for positive social change? This course explores the complex dynamics of our globalized world from a holistic, inter-disciplinary, and transnational perspective. Together we examine multiple world issues, such as global inequality and poverty, food security, human rights, water, energy, population growth, migration, cultural change, and public health, and our individual and community roles as agents of social change on local and global levels. This course is connected to the Wednesday World Issues Forum speaker series. Credit/Evaluation: Attendance (required); preparation for class; respectful, engaged participation in class; reading and speaker reflections; a final summary essay, and a social justice action. There will be no course credit for anyone who misses three (3) classes in the quarter. Course Text: INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL POLITICS by Lamy, Steven; et al.; (2018); selected readings for each speaker on Canvas.

FAIR 245 Theory/Structure in Pop Music

Credits: 4

Instructor: Sehman

This course will examine the fundamental concepts of music theory, including reading and writing musical notation, scales, intervals, triads, chord progressions, and musical structure. We will then take the crucial next step of applying theory, to understand how those techniques are used in context to create meaningful, expressive music. We will analyze songs in different styles and genres, chosen by both the instructor and students. The sheet music for these songs will be used as a means for analysis, to better understand the music theory and songwriting techniques used. Through analysis, written responses and discussion of songs, students will be encouraged to refine their ability to clearly and effectively communicate their ideas about music. Focus will also be given to the larger cultural context the songs and artists we examine exist within. A song has many internal structures and meanings. But importantly a song also looks outward, interacting with the culture it exists within. And this is fundamental to our understanding of that music. The goal of this course is to enrich our understanding of the music we interact with, whether it be as listeners, performers or songwriters. No experience with music theory or reading music notation is required. Text: Principles of Music, by Philip Lambert (Oxford University Press) Requirements/Evaluation: Students will be expected to complete all reading and listening assignments, and participate in class discussion that arise from these. There are will also be weekly music theory assignments. Students will analyze and present at least one song to the class during the quarter. Evaluation will be based on successful completion of material and active involvement.

FAIR 246 Mariachi Music/Perform&Culture

Credits: 3

Instructor: Miyake

Ever since its establishment as a centerpiece of Mexican popular culture in the first half of the 20th century, Mariachi music has acted both as a central expression of Mexican identity and also as one of the most widely recognized representations of Mexican people and culture for those outside of this community. Students in this class will explore this cultural and artistic movement through both academic engagement and hands-on experience in creating this music themselves. Class meetings will include sessions in which we will discuss academic and popular texts on Mariachi music and culture as well as participating in discussions with guest speakers and performers, and sessions in which class members will learn to perform Mariachi music in both individual and ensemble formats. No experience in performing Mariachi music is required for this class- all instruction and expected musical collaborations will be designed to fit the experience level of each individual student. This course is repeatable for up to a total of twelve (12) credits. Required Texts: Wade, Bonnie C. Thinking Musically: Experiencing Music, Expressing Culture. 3rd ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 2013. Sheehy, Daniel Edward. Mariachi Music in America: Experiencing Music, Expressing Culture. New York: Oxford University Press, 2006.

Texts for this course will also include other articles, book chapters, and music as assigned by the instructor.

NB: Alternate readings will be provided for students who have already received credit for this course in an earlier quarter Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will take account of regular attendance, evidence of critical reading, engagement in class discussion and completion of assignments.

FAIR 255Y Folk Music Experience

Credits: 2

Instructor: Bower

Course Description: This course combines playing folk music with the study of the contexts in which folk music has evolved. For this quarter, the course will focus on women in country music. Students will be expected to participate in discussions on readings assigned during the first five weeks of the course. The class will choose several tunes to practice together over the course of the quarter. In addition, each student will also be asked to introduce one song to the class that enriches our knowledge of folk music or the context within which folk music has been written and performed. We will encourage that these songs come from the contemporary folk music scene. Evaluation: Students will write a short research paper that forms the basis for their presentation on the song and its context. Students will also be responsible for learning and practicing the songs that are presented to the class, including practice in small groups. Students are encouraged to gain practice at playing one or more folk music instruments during the course, and are invited to join the course even if they are beginners at playing an instrument or if they prefer to just sing. Text: Woman Walk the Line: How the Women in Country Music Changed Our Lives edited by Holly Gleason Credit/Evaluation: Regular attendance and participation in our weekly sing, informed participation in class discussions, one short research paper and song presentation, and practicing music in a small group.

FAIR 270H Intro to Audio Recording

Credits: 4

Instructor: Wallace

Introduction to Audio explores the techniques, tools, and technology used in multi-track recording. From a beginner's perspective, this course works to develop the fundamental skills of critical listening, analog signal flow, and basic analog/digital hybrid recording. By examining the various steps in the recording process students will learn the concepts and skills necessary to use studio equipment such as microphones (their characteristics and placement), mixing consoles (explained in detail), hard disk recording, patch bays, signal and effect processors, and headphone systems. Each student is also expected to attend a weekly two-hour small group lab, held in the studio, giving the student a chance to experience multi-track recording in a hands-on manner. Texts: Modern Recording Techniques (9th edition) by David Miles Huber and selected readings from The Audio Expert by Ethan Winer. Excerpts from the Audio Expert text will be available online. Credit/Evaluation: Students will be evaluated through a combination of participation, attendance (lab and lecture), reading assignments, and understanding gained from the material evaluated from a hands-on assessment. Additionally, students will be required to complete a basic tracking session with their lab assistant in the studio as a final project.

FAIR 297A Disability Identity Dev.

Credits: 4

Instructor: Pierce

FAIR 297A, Disability Identity Development Disability Identity Development is designed to provide students with an in depth look into disability through the contexts of identity, community, and history. Students will be asked to reflect on their views on disability through the lens of Critical Disability Studies, address internalized ableism, and examine how disability manifests in various contexts. This work will be supported through a combination of community based and academic texts, in particular focusing on Eli Clare's Brilliant Imperfection: Grappling with Cure. Students will be asked to reflect on these texts and make connections to their own lives and local Western and Bellingham communities. Students will be evaluated through in-class discussions and journaling and the course will culminate in a final project where students explore one of the weekly themes in depth through additional research. For this course, students should have at least an introductory background in disability identity (no specific coursework required) and be prepared to engage with peers and course materials critically and through an intersectional lens. If you have concerns about meeting this expectation, please consult with the instructor before enrolling. This class will be taught by undergraduate student Dee Mooney as their senior project for Fairhaven College. Clayton Pierce is the advising professor for this course.

FAIR 297D Live Sound Reinforcement

Credits: 5

Instructor: Miyake

This is a class led by Fairhaven student Will Clawson under the sponsorship and guidance of Professor Mark Miyake (Mark.Miyake@wwu.edu) Email: clawsow@wwu.edu 5 Credits

Prerequisite- FAIR 270H: Introduction to Audio Recording or equivalent In this course, experienced audio technology students will explore the field of professional sound reinforcement. This is a crucial skill set for anyone seeking to work in audio technology professionally. Students will examine the differences between professional studio and live sound from the perspectives of industry, technology, and artistry before delving into topics for live sound. Specific subjects include: Reinforcement vs reproduction, system layout, monitor mixing and feedback reduction, gear storage standards, as well as non-technical knowledge such as industry layout, job hunting, working with other types of event technicians (lights, projections, rigging), and working with performers. In addition to discussions, students will also receive hands-on training setting up and running events at Make.Shift Art Space before throwing an end-of-year event as a culminating project on campus. Students in this class will also have opportunities to apply their skills at BAMF! 2019 and with the Washington State Parks Folk & Traditional Arts Program.

Learning Objectives: Students will: Explore the applied technical differences between studio and live audio system operation; discuss the political implications of event technical work (especially event accessibility and institutionalized misogyny); understand appropriate audio system design for a variety of settings and genres; be able to construct a healthy monitor mix by utilizing techniques for performer management and feedback reduction; work effectively within their role at an event with a lighting designer, projectionist, and/or stage manager; construct creative Front of House mixes, and know how to search for gigs and present themselves on-paper and in-person as a professional. Credit/Evaluation: Students are evaluated for credit based on attendance, discussion participation, written reflections on running events throughout the quarter, and two practical tests: an in-class project and a Final Project which will include technical planning for a Make.Shift Project event and presentation of plan and learning with ability to defend against hard questions. Texts: Biederman, Raven, and Penny Pattison. Basic Live Sound Reinforcement: a Practical Guide for Starting Live Audio. Focal Press, 2014.

FAIR 297E Heavy Metal Music & Culture

Credits: 4

Instructor: Miyake

Heavy Metal: Countercultural Music and Identities FAIR 297E (4 Credits) Tuesday, Thursday 12:00pm-1:50pm This is a student-led class by Fairhaven student Ryan Ritter-Jones under the sponsorship and guidance of Professor Mark Miyake (Mark.Miyake@wwu.edu) Ryan Ritter-Jones, ritterr@wwu.edu This course will introduce students to the rich and storied culture of Heavy Metal as a global phenomenon. Metal has been pushing the boundaries of extreme music, countercultural communities, and artistic transgression for nearly five decades, and is just now coming into its own as an academic subject. By exploring the history and styles of metal, we hope to better understand why metal came to be, and where it fits in the context of American music traditions as well as countercultural scenes. Particular attention will be payed to the experience of making, listening to, and talking about metal, and the ways that those involved with the genre understand their passion for the music and its role in their lives. More broadly, the course will take an ethnomusicological approach, giving students a chance to explore concepts like field work, ethnography, phenomenological observation and performativity. Learning Objectives: -To become familiar with the musical and cultural ideas that define metal and make it the unique complex of expressions that it is. - To understand how societal values are enforced, challenged, disrupted or toyed with in the metal community. - To broaden one's expectations of music; how we listen to it, how we talk about it, how we study it, and how we use it in our lives. Students should be able to refine the analytic techniques they use when listening to music and reflect on their personal relationship with music. Credit/Evaluation: Participation in critical listening exercises and class discussions. An ethnography style essay on the students experience attending a live concert, preferably featuring metal or some countercultural style. A research project on a particular aspect of metal or countercultural music. The information gathered will be organized and shared with the class by way of a mini-class / presentation on your chosen topic. Required Texts: Kahn-Harris, Keith. Extreme Metal Music and Culture on the Edge. Oxford: Berg, 2007; Klosterman, Chuck. Fargo Rock City: A Heavy Metal Odyssey in Rural North Dakota. New York: Scribner, 2003. Other book chapters and articles will be included in the Electronic Reserves for this course on Canvas.

FAIR 297F Gender-Based Violence

Credits: 4

Instructor: Helling

This is a student-led class taught by student Rochelle Hale under the guidance and supervision of Professor Julie Helling. This course introduces the issue of gender-based violence in a holistic way, looking at it from both a legal and legislative perspective both in the United States and abroad, while also exploring peer-reviewed research on the subject, survivor testimonies, and forms of resistance that have come about as a result of the violence experienced by marginalized genders. The objective of this course is to provide background on the history of gender-based violence, as well as proposed solutions, through the lens of those who have survived this type of violence. This course takes a survivor-oriented, bottom-up approach to looking at gender-based violence. Course materials will draw on literature across a variety of disciplines, including history, the law, and government policy, while also incorporating novels, poems, and online videos. Students will meet twice a week, and before each class meeting, students will be assigned reading and will be asked to provide a short online response to that reading. About midway through the term, students will begin work on a group project that will center around acts of resistance seen around the world in response to gender-based violence. There will also be an assigned final reflection paper. Evaluation/Credit: In order to be a participating member of this course, students will be asked to regularly attend class meetings. This is a seminar-style class, which means that it relies heavily on student participation, critical thinking and analysis. I ask that students not miss more than three class meetings. If you are going to be absent, please let me know as soon as possible. Credit will be awarded for regular attendance and participation, and the timely completion of all assignments, including the midterm project and final paper. This course will be graded pass/fail. At the end of the course, students will be asked to complete a self-evaluation that will be submitted through Web4U. If you need clarification on self-evaluations, or the requirements of the course generally, please meet me for my office hours.

Required Texts: Nasheba Barzey Life or Green Card (book); Lisa Factora-Borchers Dear Sisters: Letters from Survivors of Sexual Violence (book); Joining Forces: Empowering male survivors to thrive by Dr. Howard Fradkin (book); Assorted materials to be provided on Canvas by the instructor.

FAIR 297O Critical Cannabis Narratives

Credits: 5

Instructor: Haizlip

Cannabis, marijuana, weed, hemp, hashish, ganja, pot, reefer; all around the world, these words come with a smile and a wink. What does one have to know to be "in the know" about cannabis? In Washington we may find cannabis ubiquitous, but the depth of the interspecies relationship between humans and cannabis remains out of reach of public discussion. This course will conduct an interdisciplinary exploration of cannabis, rooted firmly in history and culture and growing through botany, political ecology, pharmacology, economics, social justice, sustainability, public health, somatic psychology, and other subjects of student interest. To investigate cannabis using the perspective of auto-ethnobiology, we will critically examine and create cannabis narratives. Part aesthetic portrait, part qualitative research, the cannabis narrative is a tool for building a people's history of cannabis by documenting the subtle ecologies that form between individual humans and cannabis plants. A special element of this course will be the option to tour several cannabis producing and processing facilities licensed under Washington's Initiative 502. Students will create two cannabis narrative projects during this course: one by self-reflection and self-portraiture, and one by conducting a semi-structured interview with a person in the cannabis community. *** Students under age 21 are welcome to join this course, however an alternative activity will be provided for cannabis facility tours. This course does not require the consumption of cannabis nor encourage students to use or purchase cannabis. Students will follow all applicable state and local laws and University policies.

FAIR 303A Core:Intrdisc Cncntrtn Sem Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: O Murchu

Prerequisites: FAIR 101A, FAIR 201A, FAIR 203A, FAIR 305A What questions do you want to explore in your Interdisciplinary Concentration? (Are you asking questions, for example, about inequalities, ecology, musical cultures, or performance?) Why are these questions important enough intellectually, politically, socially or professionally to form the basis for your Interdisciplinary Concentration? Your challenge in the Concentration Seminar is a two- or three-fold one. First, you must answer the question of why your concentration matters to your own satisfaction. Second, you want to communicate the reasons why your concentration's questions matter to the mythical "average reader" in your rationale. Third, you must identify the set of courses, independent study projects, internships, or other forms of experiential learning that allow you to explore your underlying questions about your subject in the rest of your time at Fairhaven College. In practical terms, the seminar is designed to assist you with your development and writing of an interdisciplinary concentration. It will serve as a forum for discussion, guidance, and support during the proposal writing process. You will work collaboratively with your seminar, your instructor, and your concentration committee, to write your learning proposal and identify relevant courses and experiences to help you achieve your educational goals. Here are some of the practical questions this seminar will help to address: - What are the appropriate guidelines and requirements involved? - What exactly is it you want to achieve in your degree? - How can your intentions be given effective shape and form? - Who should be on your committee? - How do the parts of your concentration work together conceptually? - What are the best vehicles for your learning? - What should you put in and what should you leave out of your concentration? Text: Handbook on Canvas + Occasional Readings distributed in class Credit/Evaluation: Faithful preparation for and attendance at seminar; Steady work on your proposal; Contributions to the development of your group members' proposals. Credit for the course is granted when your completed committee-approved proposal has been filed with the Fairhaven Records Office and a regular self-evaluation form is submitted to the instructor.

FAIR 311B The American Legal System Society and Individual 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Helling

Theme: Race and Education Course Description: An in-depth look at the American legal system and how it affects individuals and society, with coverage of legal vocabulary, sources of law, the structure of the government, the Supreme Court and the judicial system. We will focus on the structure and evolving nature of the legal system, legal reasoning and the role of courts in government. Case analysis skills will be stressed, including identifying the issue, procedural history, facts, reasoning and holding of each case.

We will particularly examine issues of affirmative action in school admissions to explore lines of precedent. Students will also engage in a mock trial. Texts:Class Manual of case readings prepared by Instructor and

 

 

 

 

 

Any legal dictionary (Barron's is recommended) Credit and Evaluation:No more than THREE absences will be allowed if you want credit for this class. Active and informed class participation will be expected. Assignments will include oral presentations on Supreme Court Justices, weekly case briefs and worksheets, an 8-10 page research paper, and satisfactory participation in the mock trial.

 

FAIR 314E Critical Pedagogy Society and Individual 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Pierce

Course Description: In this course we will draw from empirical research to examine the social, political, economic, and historical context of schooling for students of color in U.S. K-12 and higher educational systems. Students will be introduced to a set of ethnic studies concepts and theories from which to better understand the educational experiences and realities of historically underrepresented students. The course will also challenge students to reflect on their educational experiences and the schooling conditions of students of color in general, and to apply the concepts introduced in class to their own educational sexperiences. More specifically, the course is intended to enable students to: 1.Develop an understanding of the histories, concepts, perspectives, and theories used to examine the complex realities of historically underrepresented students; 2.Articulate their understanding of concepts such as privilege, microagressions, institutional racism, whiteness, resistance, decolonization, and activism, and apply these concepts to their personal educational experiences and to the debate over educational (under)achievement, (in)equity, and the politics of education; 3.Engage in inter-ethnic/racial dialogues about race and racism, the use of power and privilege to institutionalize inequity, methods for achieving social and educational change. Texts: The main text for the course will include Is Everyone Really Equal? An Introduction to Key Concepts in Social Justice Education by Ozlem Sensoy and Robin DiAngelo, with accompanying blogs and media sources. Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will take account of regular attendance, evidence of critical reading, engagement in class discussion, and completion of assignments.

FAIR 319B Critical Race Theory Society and Individual 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Calderon

319b Current Issues in the Law: Critical Race Theory Dolores Calderon Throughout American history, race has shaped the lives of individuals, social and political institutions, and the cultural climate of the nation. This impact has been mediated through the law and legal institutions. Critical Race Theory (CRT) in the law examines the interconnections between race and law, and particularly the ways in which race and law are mutually constitutive. This course will pursue this project by exploring themes within CRT. We will study the role of law as historically central to and complicit in upholding racial hierarchy. We will focus on the origins of the critique and the contrasts between CRT and liberal and conservative analytical frameworks on race and American law and society. The point of departure for the course is an exploration of race itself and the role law plays in constructing this identity. Course readings will be taken from both classical works of Critical Race Theory and newer interventions in the field.

Credit/Evaluation: Regular attendance, engaged/active participation in all class exercises, engagement in class discussion, strong evidence of reading, quality performance on assignments throughout the quarter, quality of writing. Required Text: Critical Race Theory, by Kimberle Crenshaw, Neil Gotanda and Garry Peller. Pre-requisite Courses: FAIR 311B or PLSC 311 or by permission of instructor. Completion of AMST 301 or FAIR 203 or FAIR 314E or EDUC 411 strongly recommended.

 

FAIR 330E Ethnobotany Science and Our Place on the Planet 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Tuxill

For thousands of years plants have provided humankind with food, medicine, fuel, shelter, and inspiration. This course concerns the science of ethnobotany--the study of interactions between people and plants. We will examine the history and geography of plant use and knowledge by human societies worldwide, and the many ways that plants continue to contribute to our wellbeing today. Ethnobotanical perspectives on conservation, agriculture, grassroots development, environmental education, and sustainable living also will be highlighted. During the course we will gain practical skills for identifying and utilizing Pacific Northwest flora, and put our skills to work on an applied research project and group gardening effort at the Outback campus farm.

Texts: Jim Pojar and Andy MacKinnon, PLANTS OF THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST COAST; William Elpel, BOTANY IN A DAY. Other required readings will consist of journal articles, book chapters, and essays made available electronically.

Credit/Evaluation: As part of the course, students will be expected to: 1) Prepare a collection of at least 20 plant specimens, including identification and documentation of uses for each plant collected. 2) Research and write a case study of ethnobotanical knowledge and its practical applications, based on either an in-depth interview or library research. 3) Give a concise class presentation about an ethnobotanically significant plant. 4) Contribute to a collaborative class field project in the Outback gardens.

Regular class attendance and informed contribution to discussions is essential. Students also will be evaluated on their grasp and understanding of the themes and issues presented in the readings, including the foundations of plant identification and the ethical aspects of ethnobotanical research and plant use.

FAIR 334Q Science/Music of Natrl Sounds Science and Our Place on the Planet 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Bower

Course Description: Murray Schafer, a Canadian composer, coined the word "soundscape" to describe all the sounds that reach the ear from a particular environment. His book by the same name broke new ground in thinking about soundscapes, and in particular about how soundscapes have evolved and changed with the rise of humans as a dominant species. Through student-led seminars, we will consider Schafer's ideas including such topics as the physics of sound and how sound travels through the environment, how and why animals produce sound, the relationship between natural sounds and music, the history of sound, sound pollution, and whether society should consciously chose the sounds we are exposed to. In the field, we will explore Bellingham area soundscapes, recording sound from natural environments (wind, rain, birds, frogs, and other environmental sounds) and human influenced environments (farms, trains, marina sounds, downtown sounds, etc.). In the lab, students will use digital software to create a digital "soundscape" for inclusion in a class CD. No previous recording or digital editing experience is required. Texts: THE SOUNDSCAPE by Murray Schafer and other readings as assigned. Credits/Evaluation: Regular attendance, participation in recording field trips, completion of the "soundscape" audio project, leading classroom discussions and informed participation in other student-led discussions, written responses to the reading, and one major research presentation.

FAIR 335Q Qualitative Research Methods Society and Individual 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Delucio

Description: We all have curiosities and questions about how the world works. In the realm of social science, these questions typically center around people...how they interact, how they understand one another and their society, how they identify, what impacts their behavior, and how we can help them. This course will serve as an introduction to qualitative social science research methods and how to implement empirical research projects. We will cover topics including philosophies of science, an overview of the research process, conducting ethical studies, differences in qualitative methods and methodologies, biases in the research process, evaluating existing research, and community-based approaches. Some overarching goals of this course include: demystifying the research process and what it entails and developing projects that may serve as a foundation for a future ISP or senior project. This course will emphasize that, at its core, research is about tapping into one's curiosities, asking questions, and figuring out ways to answer them.

Required text: Braun, V., & Clarke, V. (2013). Successful qualitative research: A practical guide for beginners. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publishing.

Recommended reference: American Psychological Association. (2010). Publication manual of the American Psychological Association (6th ed.). Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association. Additional readings will be uploaded to Canvas Evaluation Criteria: Regular attendance (i.e., no more than 3 absences); active and engaged participation in class discussions and activities; a reflective paper outlining personal motivations influencing research topics of interest; a research proposal on a topic of the student's choosing; and a final presentation.

 

FAIR 336B Outback Farm and Food Justice Society and Individual 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Pierce

Food justice has become an important concept and movement both in the U.S. and across the globe. In its most general sense, food justice in the U.S. is a social and political movement led by working class communities and communities of color to take control of their own food production and distribution. Moving away from the industrial, corporate driven food system that is built on and perpetuates racial, economic, and gender inequality, food justice movements work to promote access to healthy and affordable food for the most vulnerable and exploited communities. But what does food justice mean in the context of WWU's campus and for Fairhaven College? More specifically, what might food justice projects look like created by Fairhaven students in the Outback Farm? This five credit course is designed as a praxis oriented class to provide students with the opportunity to create, experiment, and generally think of ways the Outback Farm can be a site of food justice practice and link to food justice movements in Bellingham and the region. Student Learning Outcomes:

-Learning principles of food justice praxis from existing research literature -Experience with design and implementation of food justice project in the Outback Farm -Experience researching local food justice projects/organizations -Identifying food justice needs on campus Student Evaluation: Participation in class discussion and regular attendance; Timely and thoughtful completion of course readings and writing assignments; quality of writing assignments that use evidence from course readings; quality of reflection projects; critical and respectful engagement in class Course Texts: All course readings will be provided on Canvas as PDF. Students are required to print out and bring hard copies of readings for the corresponding class meeting.

FAIR 336B Rad Feminist Imaginations Society and Individual 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Spira

Radical Feminist Political Imaginations of the Neoliberal Turn Characterized by a clamping down of revolutionary social movements both within and beyond US borders, the 1980s are generally understood as a period of great political and cultural backlash. Indeed, during this time, marginalized communities were overwhelmingly subject to worsening conditions, including a draconian rise in incarceration and a gutting of the public sector, alongside the outright repression of struggles for national liberation, de-colonization and Black power across the Americas. And yet, perhaps paradoxically, this period also witnessed a burgeoning explosion of vibrant feminist political organizing and cultural production - and particularly among anti-racist, queer, indigenous, women of color, working class and Third World feminisms. This interdisciplinary course examines social theory and historiographies, alongside the works of radical feminist activists and writers of the era to explore this powerful cultural-political force that came to the fore in a period that might otherwise be classified as one of revolution's disillusionment and despair. Emphasizing the projects of radical feminists (including Gloria AnzaldЈa, Audre Lorde, June Jordan, Gayl Jones, Pat Parker and Dorothy Allison) we will work to tease out the collective visions of transformation engendered through the "radical feminist imagination." Together we will ask: How do these writers turn to, and re-invent, the genre of personal narrative to creatively express and challenge the complex workings of power in their historical juncture? Which "radical" feminists and movements do we remember and who has been forgotten? And, what might a re-consideration of this vibrant moment offer for movement building strategies and praxis today? Texts: Authors we will read include: Jacquie Alexander, Gloria AnzaldЈa, Kristin Bumiller, Suheir Hammad, Grace Kyungwon Hong, Gayl Jones, June Jordan, Audre Lorde, Cherre Moraga, Pat Parker and Chela Sandoval. Requirements / Evaluation: This course requires close readings and deep engagement with course materials, as well as active participation in building class discussion and community. Assignments include frequent short response papers, class facilitation, constructive peer-review and an original final essay.

FAIR 336B Psych of Sexual Orientation Society and Individual 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Delucio

Description: Through this course students will explore theoretical perspectives, empirical findings, and applied topics regarding the psychology of sexual orientation. By examining the current state of psychological knowledge and narratives around sexual orientation, we will consider various aspects of the lives of individuals who identify as gay, lesbian, bisexual, pansexual, heterosexual, queer, and beyond. Topics of exploration will include: identity development, stigma and minority stress, adolescence, relationships, aging, workplace issues, mental and physical health, therapy and intervention, and cultural influences. We will also explore how heterosexism intersects with other systems of oppression (e.g., racism, sexism) to impact the lived experience(s) of individuals and communities reflecting a marginalized sexual orientation. Required Texts: Patterson, C.J., & D'Augelli, A.R. (Eds.) (2015). Handbook of psychology and sexual orientation. New York, NY: Oxford University Press. Recommended reference: American Psychological Association. (2010). Publication manual of the American Psychological Association (6th ed.). Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association. Additional course readings will be provided on Canvas. Criteria for Credit/Evaluation: Regular attendance (i.e., no more than 3 absences); active and engaged participation in class discussions; a reflective paper outlining personal sexual orientation development and understanding; a research paper focusing on an issue related to sexual orientation from a psychological perspective; and a final presentation. ?

FAIR 336M Audio Tech, Music & Society Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Miyake

Course Description: Students in this course will explore the connections between the changing nature of audio technology and cultural and social movements and functions from the perspectives of both music producers and music listeners/consumers. Over the last century, recording technology has shifted from physical acoustic recorders to digital audio workstations and consumer products have shifted from wax cylinders to online streaming services. Each step along either of these paths has had a profound impact on the ways in which people interact with music and the ways in which social and cultural groups related to music function and maintain and identify themselves. In examining this set of relationships through course readings, classroom discussion, student-led classes, and original research, students will both learn to make direct connections between the studies of audio technology, of music production, and of music consumption and also gain a deeper understanding of the ways in which these fields rely on each other to function in a social and cultural context. Required Texts: Chasing Sound: Technology, Culture, and the Art of Studio Recording from Edison to the LP by Susan Schmidt Horning; Wired for Sound: Engineering and Technologies In Sonic Cultures, edited by Paul D. Greene and Thomas Porcello; My Music, My War: The Listening Habits of U.S. Troops in Iraq and Afghanistan by Lisa Gilman Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will take account of regular attendance, evidence of critical reading, engagement in class discussion, two written assignments, a group student-taught class, and one final project.

FAIR 336M Minimalism & Art of Repetition Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Sehman

Minimalism and the Art of Repetition Instructor: Steven Sehman

Course Description: In the 1960s in New York City's art scene, a new style emerged that stripped the visual arts of all but its essential elements. A sculpture by Robert Morris may consist of a series of carefully stacked blocks; a wall drawing by Sol LeWitt is a series of gently curving parallel lines. This aesthetic soon spread to the experimental music scene, where sparse textures, extreme repetition, and slowly evolving structures became common. Minimalism challenges deeply held notions of narrative and aesthetics in art and music. As such, essential questions emerge: how does one contextualize and experience, for example, a large canvas painted solid black; or a piece of music consisting of a single tape loop playing over, and over? What is the artists' intent, and what "meaning" is to be found in this art? This course will explore the Minimalist aesthetic in music, from its roots in the 1960s counter culture, to current trends. We will examine important works from four key figures in Minimalism: La Monte Young, Terry Riley, Philip Glass, and Steve Reich. This foundational study will then explore the many other musics influenced by Minimalism, including: -Early techno styles (Kraftwerk) -Experimental, synth-based, electronic music (ђliane Radigue; Holly Herndon) -Film scores (Koyaanisqatsi) -Pop and rock music (The Velvet Underground, Bjork) Special emphasis will be given to critical listening. Students will listen to a wide array of music, chosen by the instructor and the class, and compile a listening journal over the course of the term. No technical experience with music is required for this class. Rather, students of any background will be asked to actively engage with art and music.

Text: Readings will be compiled from various sources: Cox, Cristopher and Daniel Warner, editors. Audio Culture: Readings in Modern Music. Bloomsbury, 2017. Holmes, Thom. Electronic and Experimental Music: Technology, Music, and Culture. Routledge, 2016. Potter, Keith. Four Musical Minimalists. Cambridge University Press, 2000. Ross, Alex. The Rest is Noise. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2007. Requirements/Evaluation: -Students will be expected to complete all reading and listening assignments, and actively participate in class discussion that arise from these. -Students will also be expected to create a listening journal, based on their personal listening experiences. -There will also be occasional written responses associated with readings and listening examples. - Students will complete a final creative project, in their chosen media (visual arts, sculpture, video, music, etc.). (No experience with art making required.)

 

FAIR 336N Animal Behavior Science and Our Place on the Planet 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Bower

Course Description: The primary focus of this course will be the study of animal behavior in a scientific and, more precisely, evolutionary context. We will approach this subject through both the academic study of animal behavior and through scientific field-based studies of animals. The class will be primarily devoted to the behavior of wild, non-domesticated animals, but there will also be some time devoted to domesticated animals such as dogs, cats, and horses. Field research will be in small groups and will involve developing research methods, conducting field research, analyzing data, and writing up field study results. Texts: Paul Sherman and John Alcock: EXPLORING ANIMAL BEHAVIOR: READINGS FROM AMERICAN SCIENTIST, SIXTH EDITION. Additional readings will be made available. Requirements for credits and criteria for evaluation: Participation in class discussions, study design, fieldwork, data analysis, and the writing of the results of field studies, as well as several other short writing assignments.

FAIR 336N Ethnomathematics Science and Our Place on the Planet 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Coulet du Gard

Description: Ethnomathematics; Mathematics, Science and Symbolism. This course is a unique approach to the discipline of mathematics. Building on Howard Gardner's theory of "multiple intelligences", this course investigates cultural differences in mathematical reasoning. In FAIR 336N, we will examine ways of using and thinking about mathematical concepts as they pertain to ancient and present cultures. This includes numeracy and mathematics, the symbolic reasoning and logical systems of time calculations, and quantities. We will begin the course by examining our own ( and present US) attitudes and experiences with Mathematics. No Texts: all readings in Canvas. Course Requirements: Attend regularly (no more than 3 missed classes); be prepared with readings and for discussions in class; complete one group discussion presentation, write 3 essays, including both reflective and analytical essays; and complete one presentation, paper, or project at the end of the quarter.

 

FAIR 336N Wild Foods Science and Our Place on the Planet 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Lloyd

Wild Foods (FAIR 336N) Instructor: T. Abe Lloyd This course introduces students to the wild edible foods found within the major ecosystems of the Pacific Northwest (including marine coastlines, streams, lakes, wetlands, forests at a variety of elevations, and urban areas). We will learn how nutrients are available in different parts of the plants and animals at different times of the year, how to make those nutrients available through cooking or detoxifying, and how to make them last long enough to feed us when fresh foods are not available (i.e. harvesting, processing, and preserving). In addition to practical field study of edible (and poisonous) organisms, we will have seminar discussions on topics such as Indigenous food systems, environmental sustainability, colonialism, and cultivating a sense of place. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: Identify several common edible plant, animal, and fungi species found in the Pacific Northwest; Understand the relationship between harvest timing and edibility; Understand how the life history strategy of an organism relates to the harvest sustainability; Understand how geology and climate influence vegetation at multiple scales, and how a forager can move forward or backwards in phenological time; Gain appreciation for Northwest Coast Native American world views and harvest traditions; Identify poisonous species found within this area; Use field identification resources effectively; Use a field notebook effectively; Compare the environmental and social costs of different food systems. Required text and supplies: 1.Earth's Blanket by Nancy J. Turner. 2.Plants of the Pacific Northwest coast: Washington, Oregon, British Columbia, and Alaska, revised edition by Pojar & MacKinnon. 3.A Rite-in-the-Rain notebook (4-5/8"x7" recommended). 4.And at least two of the following field guides: Forager's Harvest, Nature's Garden, or Incredible Wild Edibles by Sam Thayer; Pacific Feasts by Jennifer Hahn; Pacific Northwest Foraging by Douglas Deur; Food Plants of Coastal First Peoples by Nancy Turner; Wild Foods from Dirt to Plate by John Kallas; Stalking the Blue-eyed-scallop by Euell Gibbons. Credit/Evaluation: Complete regular Identification Quizzes, prepare a Wild Food Species Account, and maintain a detailed Field Notebook documenting your hands-on explorations of wild foods during the quarter.

 

FAIR 336V Video and Sound Art Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Feodorov

Please note: Since this is not an intro class and we will not spend time learning how to operate or use equipment. Students are expected to already possess basic technical skills with Video and/or Sound (music, field recording, sound design, etc), and possess a keen interest in exploring and experimenting with ideas and pushing the limits of conventional expectations through their projects. Please contact the instructor if you have any questions about whether this course is right for you. In the early 20th century, modern artists attempted to expand upon or destroy existing notions of what Art was or could be. The development of recorded sound and movie cameras provided new creative opportunities to analyze and comment upon a rapidly changing world. Today, video and recorded sound are everywhere, and artists regularly use these media to express and explore ideas, events and experiences in ways that more traditional art forms cannot.

This course will provide students with opportunities to create, develop and push their ideas and skills in the areas of video and/or sound within the context of contemporary Art, culminating in public display, screening or an intervention. Emphasis will be placed upon experimentation and the development of concepts in combination with existing skills. Students will create two fully developed projects, presenting proposals, timelines, and giving regular progress reports to the class throughout the quarter. Students will also create five short project "sketches" in response to themes voted on by the class. Students will present their projects, along with a written artist statement, to the class during critique/feedback sessions. Collaborations are welcome and encouraged. Students will also learn about numerous artists who have pioneered the use of film/video and sound as Art, as well as more contemporary examples. Each student will give a presentation near the end of the quarter on an artist who has inspired them and their work.

Textbook: None, but required readings will be available on Canvas or online.

Credit and Evaluation: Students will be evaluated based upon their commitment to their projects, regular and punctual attendance, active informed participation in class discussions, and timely completion of all projects and required readings. Students are expected to challenge themselves both creatively and intellectually. An open-mind and enthusiasm for your work is essential for successful completion of this class. S/U grading.

FAIR 336V Identity through Art Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Feodorov

Course Description (Please note that this is a 300-level studio art course. Prior experience in drawing and two-dimensional art-making is required since the course assumes students have already developed some basic drawing skills.) In her 2001 essay, "The Art of Testimony", author Carol Becker wrote, "So much of the work that has infuriated politicians [...] was art that provided personal testimony, work that said, 'This is my experience of daily life. Here is how I am seen or not seen in America and in the world.'" In this course, students will use art-making (2-D, 3-D, Video, Sound/Music) as a means of exploring, questioning, expressing and experimenting with concepts of Identity and Intersectionality as they apply to their own lives and communities. Students are encouraged to think deeply and honestly about who they are, who they think they are, and what this might mean both individually and as members of a community. Students will also reflect upon whether Identity entails an awareness and understanding of social responsibility. However, the goal of this course is not to define what that responsibility might/should look like. Rather, the objective is to use art-making as an exploration and intentional voicing of who we are and why that matters. Students will create several art projects based on Identity that are tailored to their individual situations. These could range anywhere between self-exploration to advocacy and activism. We will also have frequent class discussions regarding strategies, required readings and examples of artists who work with issues of Identity. Students will also give a presentation to the class on an artist whose work centers on issues of Identity. Textbook: None, but required readings will be available on Canvas or online.

Credit and Evaluation: Students will be evaluated based upon their commitment to their projects, regular and punctual attendance, active and informed participation in class discussions and workshops, and the timely completion of all projects, sketchbook, and required readings and assignments. Students are expected to challenge themselves both creatively and intellectually. An open-mind and enthusiasm for your work is essential for successful completion of this class. S/U grading.

FAIR 343U Survey Somatic Psych

Credits: 4

Instructor: Nichols

Students interested in the emerging field of mind-body topics will benefit from this in-depth survey of Somatic Psychology. Through the assigned text and other interdisciplinary literature, lectures, discussion, and experiential inquiry, we will examine the emergence of a transdisciplinary inquiry into the nature and debatable unity of the body, the mind, the environment, and the resulting self-organizing felt sense experience. Over the past two decades this inquiry has matured into the field of Somatic Psychology, which seeks to advance philosophical arguments and empirical evidence to support, refine, and clarify the basic assumptions of a somatic life. Parallel to this intellectual mission is developing practical applications in the clinical psychotherapeutic domain. This course will map the historical emergence of Somatic Psychology and track the core questions and assumptions that define the field. We will examine a variety of body-centered psychotherapies and movement practices, and critically assess current and future challenges of the field, centering on some of the deepest and most passionate questions of academic inquiry. Are the mind and body separate? How do the mind and body relate? What is healing? What is energy? What is the placebo effect, and what does it say about the mind and body relationship? How does the gut participate in reason? How is our experience as embodied beings sculpted by culture? This course will embrace thinking through multiple lines of reasoning and the experiential exploration of Somatic Psychology. Text: THE EMERGENCE OF SOMATIC PSYCHOLOGY AND BODYMIND THERAPY, Barnaby B. Barratt (2010, Palgrave Macmillan). Credit/Evaluation: (1) Regular and timely attendance; (2) consistent participation; (3) one midterm visual map showing comprehension of the development of the field; (4) one 6-8 page integration paper, and (5) one final group project/ presentation on a specific branch of Somatic Psychology.

FAIR 343U Embodied Agency

Credits: 4

Instructor: Nichols

We are Homo sapiens sapiens, which is Latin for wise or knowing person. As humans we have named ourselves after our capacity for reflective awareness. We are aware that we are aware, and within this awareness we must act and choose. This course follows two major concepts, embodiment and agency, to explore how they work together to create and guide our movement through the world. We will utilize the literature of embodiment and agency to bolster our conceptual understanding of choice and movement in the context of self, culture, race, class, and gender. In particular, we will seek to understand movement and agency as key concepts for constructing one's sense of identity, and for articulating one's experiences. This course will also be an opportunity to develop our natural and innate capacities for reflective awareness through mindfulness and somatic-based practices. Among the questions we will ask in this course are: What is my work--not my job, but the work that creatively inspires me? Where do my actions originate? How does my attention affect my choices? How can each of us embody our purpose, values, and passions, and make choices (agency) to bring about a shift in the social body and--hopefully--influence the world stage? What is the creative manifestation of our unique visions and how do we embody them? How does the body provide valuable forms of information beyond cognition that can guide our agency? How do we develop agency that is inspired, purposeful and in service to the common good? Required Text: Embodiment and Agency, by Sue Campbell and Letitia Maynell. Additional readings will be made available on Canvas. Credit and Evaluation:?Informed and regular discussion, participation in experiential learning, and regular attendance. Students will also be responsible for keeping a weekly journal, preparing bi-weekly reading questions, writing four papers, and a final class presentation on agency.

FAIR 370I Introduction to Pro Tools

Credits: 4

Instructor: Wallace

Prerequisites: 270H (before or during) or permission of instructor This class will introduce students to mixing and editing audio with Avid's Pro Tools 12 software. Covered topics will include: importing and recording audio into Pro Tools, editing and manipulating performances, MIDI, the use of plug-ins, and an overview of mixing processes such as compression/limiting, dithering and equalization. As this is primarily a mixing class, having already recorded material is useful but not required. Students will be expected to attend class regularly and demonstrate critical listening skills through critique of their classmates' work. Additionally, the Fairhaven Mixing Suite will be available for use all quarter and required for certain projects. Texts: Reprinted materials. Credit/Evaluation: Projects will be evaluated throughout the quarter by the instructor and the other members of the class.

FAIR 370J Studio Recording

Credits: 4

Instructor: Fish

Prerequisite: FAIR 370I or FAIR 370P Studio Recording I takes the concepts introduced in Intro to Audio and Intro to Pro Tools and allows the student to apply and practice them in a hands-on manner, with the goal of becoming familiar with and competent in the use of the equipment in the Champion St Studio. Students will complete at least four multi-track recording projects and will have the opportunity to work on other recording sessions as well. Through the students' work on these projects they will learn efficiency and speed in the techniques of tracking, overdubbing, and mixdown sessions. The recording projects will be evaluated by the instructor as well as the other students in the class. This course will also involve development of critical listening skills as well as the creative and imaginative expression possible in audio recording. Students will keep a detailed journal of their session work. This is a Pro Tools based course and enrolled students will gain access to the Fairhaven Studio, Mixing Suite, and Champion St Studios. Texts: The Recording Engineer's handbook (3rd edition) by Owsinski Credit/Evaluation: Each student must finish the assigned projects which will be critiqued by the instructor and peers based on sound quality, balance, clarity and realization. Overall evaluation will be made based on effort, participation and growth as an engineer.

FAIR 370K Advanced Studio Recording

Credits: 4

Instructor: Fish

Prerequisite: FAIR 370J or FAIR 370H This class will give students with advanced recording experience the opportunity to record and mix on an industry standard Pro Tools 12 HD system. Students will enhance their knowledge of Pro Tools and learn how to use this software in conjunction with a large-format analog mixing console. Topics such as drum sample replacement, audio quantization, convolution impulse responses, spectrum analysis, DSP processing and other advanced topics will be covered. Students will be expected to conduct at least three recording/mixing sessions throughout the quarter and prepare a final portfolio for in-class critique. Students will also learn how to properly configure Pro Tools HD hardware and software components, how to setup session templates and how to utilize each component of an HD/analog system. Enrolled students will gain access to the Fairhaven Studio, Mixing Suite, and Champion St Studios. Texts: Reprinted materials Credit/Evaluation: Projects will be evaluated throughout the quarter by the instructor and the other

FAIR 377 Music in Film Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Sehman

The expressive and narrative power of music has been joined with dramatic theatrical forms for centuries (Japanese Noh theatre, European opera), and has been intimately linked with filmmaking from the beginning of that medium's development in the early 20th century.

This course will examine the central role music plays in the interdisciplinary medium of filmmaking, ranging from the live musical accompaniment of silent films, to the epic modern action scores of Hans Zimmer. Through analysis of various films, their music, and the unified artwork they create, we will attempt to better understand how music is used as a powerful expressive tool in filmmaking.

Topics will include: -A historical overview of the evolution of film music over the 20th and 21st centuries. -Analysis of specific compositional techniques, to better understand the link between music and dramatic expression: How do film composers create tension, release, sorrow, ecstasy with music? How do composers use leitmotif to link musical themes to specific characters? How do composers use orchestration techniques and timbre to amplify the emotional or narrative context of a film? -Examination of concepts and terminology associated with film scoring, such as: spotting, cues, free timing vs. click track, diegetic vs. non-diegetic music, composing under dialogue, dead hits. -Place film scores into a larger musical-historical context, for example: -Note how the 19th century Romantic orchestral tradition has served as the model for traditional film scoring, from Max Steiner's Gone With the Wind, to John Williams' Star Wars. -Note the use of avant-garde and experimental musical styles in films such as Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey (the music of experimental Hungarian composer Gyorgy Ligeti) -Examine the use of pre-existing pop songs in films, as a way to tap the cultural and historical zeitgeist (Oliver Stone's soundtrack to Platoon); or to utilize the cultural capital of certain songs and artists (the coveted and expensive licensing of a Beatles song).

-An examination of film music outside the American tradition; notably Indian Bollywood film and music and the Italian Western. Text: Mervyn Cooke- A History of Film Music (Cambridge University Press)

Requirements/Evaluation: Film viewings will occur both in and out of class. As well, students will be expected to listen outside of class to examples of film music (for in-class analysis and discussion). -Students will also complete readings from various sources pertaining to specific films, film scoring techniques and film composers.

-A final project will include scoring some short film scenes. (Students can either write music or use pre-existing music; no musical experience is required.)

-This course is for anyone with an interest in better understanding how films and film music work, and can also serve as a foundation for those interested in pursuing film scoring.

 

FAIR 381G Topics in Lit: The Green Novel Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Simon

The Green Novel

In this course, we will read, ponder, discuss, and write in response to examples of the Green Novel - book-length works of fiction, the authors of which address human agency, both constructive and destructive, at the human/nature interface.

Novelists might address the human/nature interface so as to instigate direct action (through inspiration via a utopian vision, as in Ernest Callenbach's Ecotopia, or ecotage, as in Edward Abbey's The Monkey Wrench Gang); to warn against our current course (as in Margaret Atwood's dystopian Oryx and Crake or Cormac McCarthy's The Road); or to instill in the reader a deep understanding of Earth systems and how they work - which we might call eco-logic (as in Kurt Vonnegut's Galapagos, Frank Herbert's Dune, Kim Stanley Robinson's Red Mars, Green Mars, Blue Mars; 2312; and Aurora.)

This is effectively a literature and literary criticism class. We will craft a theoretical lens by which we may analyze these novels, as well as additional works of Green or Ecological Literature, or Climate Fiction. We'll also discuss the value of political fiction and the role of art-making in affecting social change. Texts: An assortment of novels, which may include those noted above.

Credit/evaluation: regular attendance, reading, regular written responses to the reading, and a major culminating essay (with some potential for a creative component or creative responses to the work.)

FAIR 386E Irish Lang (Gaeilge) & Song Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: O Murchu

This course introduces modern Irish (an Ghaeilge) through the study of song. Irish songs and their histories are an archive that tell stories of Ireland under British colonialism from the perspectives of the indigenous people and their descendants who have retained their language and songs. Traditional Irish songs come as laments (goltra), lullabies (suantra), and geantra (love songs), but also political songs in code using those forms. Popular songs with verses and choruses are often sung in groups or with musical accompaniment. Seannўs (old style) singing is a form of unaccompanied singing normally in Irish (Gaeilge) with melody but no harmony. In this class, we'll use nursery rhymes and school songs, comic and drinking songs, and Seannўs songs as our core texts for beginning Irish (Gaeilge) and for studying Irish culture, history, and politics.

Text book: ђamonn ? Dўnaill, Gaeilge gan Strў! - Beginners Level: A multimedia Irish language course for adults (Dublin: GaelchultЈr, 2011)

Course Resources: Online Academy of Irish Music (OAIM), Songs in Irish Gaelic with Muireann Nic Amhlaoimh https://www.oaim.ie/course/58/songs_in_irish_gaelic ђamonn ? Dўnaill, Gaeilge gan Strў - Beginners Level (Dublin: GaelchultЈr, 2011) http://www.ranganna.com/EolasCursa.aspx?id=52&lang=ga foclўir.ie Foras na Gaeilge, New English Irish Dictionary https://www.focloir.ie/ www.Teanglann.ie - Foras Na Gaeilge, Irish-English, Irish-Irish, English Irish Dictonaries Oriel Arts, The Gaelic Song Tradition in Oriel/Ceolta Orialla -- https://www.orielarts.com/songs/ Anam an Amhr in (DVD) Cartoon Saloon

Pedagogy This is a course in learning a lesser used language, Irish, through songs in Irish, which are in widespread circulation in Ireland. There are no prerequisites to take this course, but it will be easiest for students who already speak two or more languages or those who like to sing. Each class we'll work through the dialogs in a conversation primer that students have listened to at home. Most of our time will be spent studying songs from the Online Academy of Irish Music and from Cartoon Saloon, Ireland's world famous animation studio. From the songs, I will teach the grammar of: 1) conjugating verbs in various tenses in positive, negative and interrogative forms; 2) the combination of prepositions and pronouns in Irish; and 3) the changing cases for nouns; and 4) the ways different prepositions alter the start of nouns (lenition and eclipsis). We will learn to read Irish and study Irish grammar from the lyrics of the songs we sing and from our conversations book. We won't write Irish in this class. Between classes students will listen to, review, sing, and try to memorize the songs we have studied. Assignments -Attendance and courageous participation -Homework from Gaeilge gan Strў and memorizing songs -Selecting songs to share with the class -A mid-term quiz translating or reciting a song -A final exam in two parts ----An oral conversation with the instructor on themes covered in dialogs in our text book. ----A translation or transcription on a song each student has studied with explanations of several grammatical points in the song (verb tenses, noun declensions prepositions, pronouns, and possessive cases with lenition and eclipsis).

FAIR 387K Grant Writing Workshop

Credits: 4

Instructor: Coulet du Gard

Focuses on the basics of grant writing, including researching and seeking funding sources; reading and interpreting funding guidelines; developing and refining proposals, and tricks of the trade. Development of individual grant proposal required. Do you think of writing grants as begging for money? Do you have fears around money? This workshop will help you think of grant writing in a different way. Learning to prepare a good proposal allows you to help granting agencies find a way to spend the dollars they are required to spend to meet their own missions, either legislative or for tax related. You need the money. They need to spend it. Your challenge is to find a match between your need and theirs, and to persuasively articulate that match. In this workshop you will learn the basics of writing proposals to funding agencies, including how to find appropriate funding sources, how to read and interpret funding guidelines, funding restrictions, the steps for developing and refining proposals, including the budget. It is highly recommended you have identified a project and/or an agency before the course begins. Texts and Materials: 1.Tori O'Neal WINNING GRANTS STEP BY STEP, 2013 fourth ed. 2.Cheryl A. Clarke Storytelling Єfor Grantseekers 2009 3.Levine ONLINE: Guide to Writing a Funding Proposal, S. Joseph Levine at Michigan State University, http://www.learnerassociates.net/proposal/ 4. Canvas: other assigned readings: various web sources, documents and worksheets. Credit/Evaluation:

Participants will be expected to develop a grant request (LOI) and a full grant proposal to a foundation or other source of funding by the end of the course. These proposals might be directed toward funding your own work, or might be related to the work of a community non-profit agency. Attendance is critical. Evaluation will be based on participation in class writing exercises on a regular basis, the quality of feedback given in peer reviews, and the quality of the final proposals. I keep a log on attendance, participation, and required writing.

FAIR 393B Rights,Liberties,Justice in Am Society and Individual 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Lopez

FAIR 393B CRN 23774: Rights, Liberties, and Justice in America Instructor: Ceci Lopez Credits: 4 This four-credit interdisciplinary seminar engages students in the processes of critical and reflective thinking, reading and writing. It is a place to explore what these processes are, why they are valued, how they work, and where they fit into a Fairhaven education. Because we will wrestle with questions of Rights, Liberties, and Justice, and where these come from, this class is a Constitutional Law class. We will begin by reading the Federalist papers and the Articles of Confederation to understand the beginnings of our legal system. We will dissect the US Constitution and learn its structure, federal powers, individual liberty, Due Process and Equal Protection clauses. We will engage with questions such as what is first amendment speech? A right to religion? and what is privacy? In the process we will discuss contemporary issues and cases as they are informed by prior cases. Learning Objectives: Students explore the foundation documents in the formation of the structure of government in the U.S. and Continue to practice and learn about case reading and case briefing. Students expand knowledge of and practice legal research and writing, including Bluebook citation and explore themes of Rights, Liberties, & Justice historically and in the present time. Students will gain understanding of the connection between the Constitution of the US, case law, and everyday life, foster independent researchers and engaged learners and gain continued familiarity with how courts use precedent. Students will also practice oral presentations and public speaking and strengthen critical and analytical skills. Required Texts:

Constitutional Law: Principles and Policies, Fifth Edition. Chemerinsky. Selected Federalist Papers. Dover Thrift Editions 2001. Alexander Hamilton and James Madison. Articles of Confederation - available on the Web. The US Constitution - available on the Web. EVALUATION: To receive credit, students will write a 10 to 15 page typed double-spaced academic research paper on a topic related to Rights, Liberties, & Justice or other aspects of the class. Based on your research paper, also prepare an informed, eight-minute (minimum) to ten-minute (maximum) oral presentation to educate the class on the topic and on your position on the topic.

 

FAIR 397B Interdisciplinary Writing II

Credits: 4

Fairhaven students are studying to be leaders in fields that they are sometimes inventing themselves - pioneering, innovating, and revolutionizing how we do the business of being human. All leaders, especially those whose ideas challenge existing paradigms, must learn to communicate their ideas clearly, passionately, and persuasively. And human brains resonate to story. So leaders must advance arguments with good storytelling skills. We will work to sharpen our ability to write in new forms that suit our own academic interests, fusing high-level interdisciplinary research, potent persuasive argument structure, and compelling storytelling arts, and work toward developing our own distinct voices and styles for bringing written work to bear. (Interdisciplinary Writing I is the ideal preparation for this course.) This course will be, effectively, a Creative Writing workshop in researched and reported creative nonfiction. We will work on one or two core projects across the quarter, and will continue to focus on understanding how to fuse essay and story to persuade a reader or listener; on deep and thorough revision; and on developing our own unique voices as writers and thinkers, innovators and popularizers, visionaries and revolutionaries, persuaders and leaders.

Credit/evaluation: regular homework assignments, major written works and revisions, written and oral critique of classmates' work. Texts: Readings will be provided. Students will provide hard copies of their work for classmates.

FAIR 397D Interdisciplinary Writing II Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Simon

Prerequisite: FAIR 221j, a Creative Writing course, or instructor permission.

Fairhaven students are studying to be leaders in fields that they are sometimes inventing themselves - pioneering, innovating, and revolutionizing how we do the business of being human. All leaders, especially those whose ideas challenge existing paradigms, must learn to communicate their ideas clearly, passionately, and persuasively. And human brains resonate to story. So leaders must advance arguments with good storytelling skills. We will work to sharpen our ability to write in new forms that suit our own academic interests, fusing high-level interdisciplinary research, potent persuasive argument structure, and compelling storytelling arts, and work toward developing our own distinct voices and styles for bringing written work to bear. (Interdisciplinary Writing I is the ideal preparation for this course.) This course will be, effectively, a Creative Writing workshop in researched and reported creative nonfiction. We will work on one or two core projects across the quarter, and will continue to focus on understanding how to fuse essay and story to persuade a reader or listener; on deep and thorough revision; and on developing our own unique voices as writers and thinkers, innovators and popularizers, visionaries and revolutionaries, persuaders and leaders.

Credit/evaluation: regular homework assignments, major written works and revisions, written and oral critique of classmates' work.

Texts: Readings will be provided. Students will provide hard copies of their work for classmates.

 

FAIR 403A Advanced Seminar Required Core

Credits: 4

Instructor: Helling

ANNE TREAT, Spring 2007 grad, said: "There is no possible way I can give justice to the complexity of experiences, triumphs, pitfalls and challenges of my academic career in the course of this paper. This artifact of self-reflection is simply a pause in the broader conversation of my academic journey, an invitation for me to mindfully articulate the ways those things I've studied, read, discussed and experienced over the past four years have informed and challenged my personal development, and how I've chosen to integrate and express that knowledge through the actions of my life" This seminar is a wonderful opportunity to reflect on what you have been up to all these years of being educated--through writing, conversation, presentations, and listening to each other. You will read and discuss a book and other readings, co-facilitating at least one discussion; write and share a variety of short writing assignments, designed to help you complete your Summary and Evaluation, and provide a supportive community in which to summarize and critically reflect upon your Fairhaven (or Life) education. Each student will also present or teach something to the class from the heart of his or her educational experience. This course is one of our favorites to teach at Fairhaven because we learn so much about our students, and the many intriguing, complex, deep, creative and quirky ways there are to be human and to become educated. The class also illustrates the value of writing as a process of discovery, synthesis and meaning. We will all do our best to help you express most clearly what your education has been about, and are honored to learn from your stories, your minds, your creativity, and your lives. The course will be as significant as you make it. Be honest. It is your life, your education, so let us understand what it has meant and what it really means to you now.

FAIR 403A Advanced Seminar Required Core

Credits: 4

Instructor: S'eiltin

ANNE TREAT, Spring 2007 grad, said: "There is no possible way I can give justice to the complexity of experiences, triumphs, pitfalls and challenges of my academic career in the course of this paper. This artifact of self-reflection is simply a pause in the broader conversation of my academic journey, an invitation for me to mindfully articulate the ways those things I've studied, read, discussed and experienced over the past four years have informed and challenged my personal development, and how I've chosen to integrate and express that knowledge through the actions of my life" This seminar is a wonderful opportunity to reflect on what you have been up to all these years of being educated--through writing, conversation, presentations, and listening to each other. You will read and discuss a book and other readings, co-facilitating at least one discussion; write and share a variety of short writing assignments, designed to help you complete your Summary and Evaluation, and provide a supportive community in which to summarize and critically reflect upon your Fairhaven (or Life) education. Each student will also present or teach something to the class from the heart of his or her educational experience. This course is one of our favorites to teach at Fairhaven because we learn so much about our students, and the many intriguing, complex, deep, creative and quirky ways there are to be human and to become educated. The class also illustrates the value of writing as a process of discovery, synthesis and meaning. We will all do our best to help you express most clearly what your education has been about, and are honored to learn from your stories, your minds, your creativity, and your lives. The course will be as significant as you make it. Be honest. It is your life, your education, so let us understand what it has meant and what it really means to you now.

FAIR 403A Advanced Seminar Required Core

Credits: 4

Instructor: Spira

ANNE TREAT, Spring 2007 grad, said: "There is no possible way I can give justice to the complexity of experiences, triumphs, pitfalls and challenges of my academic career in the course of this paper. This artifact of self-reflection is simply a pause in the broader conversation of my academic journey, an invitation for me to mindfully articulate the ways those things I've studied, read, discussed and experienced over the past four years have informed and challenged my personal development, and how I've chosen to integrate and express that knowledge through the actions of my life" This seminar is a wonderful opportunity to reflect on what you have been up to all these years of being educated--through writing, conversation, presentations, and listening to each other. You will read and discuss a book and other readings, co-facilitating at least one discussion; write and share a variety of short writing assignments, designed to help you complete your Summary and Evaluation, and provide a supportive community in which to summarize and critically reflect upon your Fairhaven (or Life) education. Each student will also present or teach something to the class from the heart of his or her educational experience. This course is one of our favorites to teach at Fairhaven because we learn so much about our students, and the many intriguing, complex, deep, creative and quirky ways there are to be human and to become educated. The class also illustrates the value of writing as a process of discovery, synthesis and meaning. We will all do our best to help you express most clearly what your education has been about, and are honored to learn from your stories, your minds, your creativity, and your lives. The course will be as significant as you make it. Be honest. It is your life, your education, so let us understand what it has meant and what it really means to you now.

FAIR 403A Advanced Seminar Required Core

Credits: 4

Instructor: Akinrinade

Subject: This course, in your final quarter at Fairhaven College, provides an opportunity for reflection on your education. The class provides a supportive community for the summary and critical reflection process, whether you pursued a WWU major or a Fairhaven concentration. The final output will be a Summary and Evaluation (S & E) of your Fairhaven education. Through this S & E, you will reflect on your educational choices and their consequences, identify unifying trends, articulate the meaning of significant ideas and experiences, and note the gaps that remain. The course offers time to look forward, consider possibilities and challenges of your chosen community and/or occupation, and to examine questions of social responsibility and activism in relation to your education and future aspirations. This course is a collaborative effort, involving intensive writing, continuous conversation, presentations and active listening to each other. Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will take account of regular attendance, engagement in class discussions and active collaboration in the Summary and Evaluation writing process, and a Summary and Evaluation document submitted at the end of the quarter. There will be no course credit for anyone who misses three (3) classes in the quarter. Text: Hilberg, Raul: The Politics of Memory: The Journey of a Holocaust Historian (1996)

FAIR 412E LaborLaw: Org Labor Wash State Society and Individual 2

Credits: 5

Advanced Topics in the Law: Organized Labor in Washington State Instructor: Carrie Blackwood This course provides an introduction to federal, state, and local laws that govern organized labor in Washington State and the historical context that gave rise to their creation. We will focus on the historical and current contributions of people of color, women, people with disabilities, and LGBTQ persons to the labor movement. The course will also examine the historic and current exclusion of oppressed peoples from labor protections, and learn about contemporary progressive labor movements in Washington State and their achievements. Required Texts:

From the Folks Who Brought You the Weekend: A Short, Illustrated History of Labor in the United States, by Priscilla Murolo. Other materials will be available through internet access. Credit/Evaluation: Active and engaged participation in class discussion, including completion of required readings on schedule. Two research projects (to be documented with a paper and/or class presentation): the first on a major figure in the labor movement, and the second on a focused area of labor or employment law. There will also be opportunities to attend and observe local labor movement events.

FAIR 412E Immigration Law Society and Individual 2

Credits: 4

Advanced Topics in Law: Immigration Law This course will examine the law theory, and practice of U.S. citizenship and immigration law. We will explore the history of immigration law in the U.S. and how that history affects non-citizens, in the U.S. today, through practice and policy. This class will focus on two core questions: 1) How does the law regulate the treatment of noncitizens in the United States? and 2) How does the law regulate who is permitted to enter the US, who is allowed to stay in the US and who is forced to leave the US? This course will cover a broad range of topics from the history and policy of the law to the practical and technical aspects of practicing immigration law, especially in the current political climate. This course will also give students an opportunity to study case law and engage in statutory interpretation in order to expose and prepare students for law school. This course will also act as a primer for those who are interested in the intersection civil rights, employment rights, and human rights law. There is no assigned course textbook. This course will use the U.S. Immigration and Nationality Act, Code of Federal Regulations, Foreign Affairs Manual, Policy Memoranda, Administrative Decisions and other associated case law. All required text will be downloaded by the student or handed out by the instructor. Credit/Evaluation: Active and informed participation in the class, including completion of required readings on schedule. The course will culminate with two final projects - a research paper (10-12 pages) and participation in a moot court proceeding.