Courses

Fairhaven College Course Descriptions

Below you will find our current course descriptions.  Previous quarter course descriptions are also available by selecting the quarter and year you are searching for.  Electronic course descriptions are available back to winter 2009.  For information on days and times as well as location please visit Classfinder.  To register for these classes log into Web4U. Important information about registration including deadlines and fees can be found on the Registrar's Office page.  For any questions about these course descriptions or for assistance with registration please call the Fairhaven College Office at 360-650-6680. For information on Fairhaven College Wait List Policies click here.

Fairhaven College Core Requirements:

Classes determined to satisfy a Fairhaven Core requirement will be identified using the following icons: 

Letter CRequired Core Music Note Humanities and the Expressive Arts II
Leaf iconScience and Our Place on the Planet II Human iconSociety and Individual II

Non-Fairhaven Students

Most Fairhaven classes open to all WWU students who meet the prerequisites in Phase II of registration.

FAIR 101A Intro Interdisciplinary Study Required Core

Credits: 1

Instructor: Blick

This class aims to introduce students to Fairhaven College resources, practices, processes and possibilities in their first quarter of enrollment in our program. Our class activities will include small group workshops, introductions to Fairhaven resources and people, community-based activities and individual advising. We will introduce the educational practices used at Fairhaven (Writing Portfolio; Transition Conference; Independent Study, Interdisciplinary Concentration, Narrative Evaluations...) and share the essentials you need to proceed toward your chosen major and take charge of your education.

Texts: There are no textbooks. Course materials provided in class and on Canvas. Credit/Evaluation: This Fairhaven College Core Class is a graduation requirement. Award of credit will be based on documented attendance, participation and completion of assignments as indicated in the class syllabus. Bring your your curiosity, your questions and your active engagement. The learning outcomes for FAIR 101a include understanding resources, degree pathways, requirements and pedagogy that are the mission and practice at Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies.

FAIR 197E Experiential Lrng Outback Farm

Credits: 1

Instructor: Kempton

FAIR 201A Critical & Reflective Inquiry Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Takagi

Theme: Journeys

In this section we will explore the different kinds of journeys Americans have been taking over the centuries, and how they make sense of those life travels, through texts, films and through class discussion. In addition, we will embark on an intellectual journey, which will include developing and honing the skills, tools and knowledge to be a strong student and a productive, responsible member of the larger community. For each class member, this part of the journey will include identifying and analyzing one's voice and the privileges and burdens built into that voice, identifying and analyzing others' voices and building respect for those diverse perspectives, and to critically assess all forms of information (oral, written and visual). The main skill emphasized in this class will be writing. During the quarter you will sharpen and hone your writing skills. You will learn to construct an argument, gather evidence, shape your thesis to fit the audience, and organize your thoughts. In addition, you will also learn to seminar, peer edit papers, and critically analyze materials. Finally, you will learn to research and write a 6-8 page research paper with a minimum of 4 sources, proper citations and a bibliography.

-- Required Reading Readings on Canvas and on-line through library database

--Additional requirements: Regular attendance. 2 absences will reflect negatively on your evaluation. 3 absences and you will not receive credit for the class. If there is a personal/family difficulty, please let me know as soon as possible. Active participation in class and small group discussions. If you are uncomfortable with speaking in front of people, please see me as soon as possible. Peer editing of writing plan. --Paper requirements: One biographical journey paper (2-3 pages, double-spaced) + proper citation. One critical analysis (2 pages, double-spaced) + proper citation. One reflection paper (2 pages, double-spaced) + proper citation. One reflection paper (1-2 pages, double-spaced) no citations needed. One synthesis paper (2 pages, double-spaced) + proper citation. One research paper topic (1 page, double-spaced). One Draft of Research paper (rough draft 6-8 pages) OR 3-4 pages well polished portion of the research paper. Double-spaced + proper citation. Final version of research paper (6-8 pages, double-spaced) + proper citations. Writing plan for your e-portfolio draft and final version.

FAIR 201A Critical & Reflective Inquiry Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Spira

Theme: Feminisms

Concerned primarily with issues of power, oppression and justice, feminist theories have historically emerged out of movements for collective liberation. Among these are decolonization, abolition and anti-imperialist movements, as well as movements for sexual, racial, economic, and gender justice. Deeply concerned with the politics of knowledge, feminist theories aim to begin with the everyday experiences of marginalized communities in an effort to analyze--and radically transform--the unequal relations of power that shape our worlds. Informed by the field's historical imperatives towards justice, this introductory course exposes students to the critical study of feminist theories as both an interdisciplinary intellectual endeavor and a political intervention into dominant knowledge practices. Anchored in multiple "waves" of struggles for social transformation, we will explore the tangled threads of power that work to make "gender," and which take form in our own lives and worlds in obvious and not-so-obvious ways. Particular attention will be paid to questions of social location, solidarity, accountability and movement building, both historically and at present. Ultimately, a major goal of the course is for students to begin interrogating their own relationships to different genealogies of struggle, raising questions about their own potential as agents for social transformation in the classroom and in their lives.

Texts: TBA

Requirements / Evaluation: This course requires close readings and deep engagement with course materials, as well as active participation in building class discussion and community. Assignments include frequent short response papers, class facilitation, constructive peer-review, creative assignments and an original final essay.

FAIR 201A Critical & Reflective Inquiry Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Pierce

Theme: Food Justice

This course explores food justice as a political movement and alternative model of food production in communities across the U.S. and globe. Different than “food movement” or “vote with your fork” approaches favoring affluent communities, this course centers study and discussion around working class and communities of color who have shaped and defined what food justice and food sovereignty is in the U.S. from the standpoint of injustice and historic forms of structural inequity. Questions the class take up include who/what actors are involved in creating the industrial food system in the U.S.? How do ideas of private property prevent people and communities from having access to land? How “democratic” are decisions made around food options for communities? What are food deserts and food swamps and who lives in them?  In examining these questions, the course will also focus on learning how to engage texts and arguments in nuanced and critical ways. This means that our seminar will focus and have discussion on what it means to engage a text critically and how to best construct written arguments and approaches to researching questions. Along with instructor feedback on each written assignment, students will also engage in peer-editing and working collaboratively on developing research questions for the final writing assignment. 

Learning Outcomes: Define and understand the principal assumptions of the industrial food system in the U.S.; Draw connections between contemporary free market notions of freedom, equality, development, and equality with food justice concerns; Engage in the process of developing a research question, conducting research, and constructing a well reasoned argument; Develop critical reading and seminaring practices

Required Texts:

Food Justice Robert Gottlieb and Anupama Joshi, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press (2013).

Cultivating Food Justice: Race, Class, and Sustainability Allison Hope Alkon and Julian Agyeman (Eds.), Cambridge, MA: MIT Press (2011).

Biopiracy: The plunder of nature and knowledge Vandana Shiva, South End Press, (1999).

More than Just Food: Food Justice and Community Change Garrett Broad, Berkeley, CA: University of California Press (2016).

Credit/Evaluation: Participation in class discussion and regular attendance; Timely and thoughtful completion of course readings and writing assignments; quality of writing assignments that use evidence from course readings; critical and respectful engagement in class.

FAIR 201A Critical & Reflective Inquiry Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Helling

Theme: Civil Rights

This five-credit interdisciplinary seminar engages students in the processes of critical and reflective thinking, reading and writing. It is a place to explore what these processes are, why they are valued, how they work, and where they fit into a Fairhaven education. This class will also take at look at what "civil rights" are and whether relying on them can achieve equality in our country.

What is the reach and promise of the law in securing equality?

Are there inherent obstacles in pursuing a legal strategy? How might we best go about fashioning a society that includes everyone fully? Learning Objectives: -Develop critical reading and thinking skills through the close examination of various texts. -Develop awareness that critical thinking is informed by different disciplinary and theoretical frameworks, by cultural contexts, and by the intent of the critic. -Effectively plan and conduct research, reflecting on current strengths and challenges. -Develop and use revision techniques, including peer review, self-critique and faculty feedback.

Assignments include: -Ten-page revised research paper on a civil rights topic -Annotated bibliography -Complete worksheets assigned for the texts -Educational autobiography -Court observation visit

Texts: March (Books One, Two and Three) by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell; The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander; Readings as assigned Attendance and Credit Policy:This is a seminar class and your participation is important. You are expected to attend regularly and be on time; no more than three absences are allowed if you want to get credit for the course. You must also complete all assignments as well as the self-evaluation in a timely manner to get credit.

 

FAIR 201A Critical & Reflective Inquiry Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Tag

Theme: Writing in Place

The world offers itself to your imagination.--Mary Oliver.

In this seminar, we will explore many questions. Here are so me: What is the relationship between where we are and who we are? What connects locality to identity, landscape to language, place to self? How does the world offer itself to our imaginations? What does it mean to write from a certain place? How do particular places affect us: cities, woods, rooms, vehicles, mountains, farms, schools, deserts, hospitals, bodies of water? What kinds of places and spaces do we share with other people? What are the possible connections between our writing and the places it emerges from? What are the diverse ways we can write, map, illustrate, or document our lives and the contours of our personal, social, and ecological geographies? What happens to us when we encounter places or spaces, or ways of thinking and being, that are unknown, unfamiliar, or strange to us? To help us examine these questions, we will read novels, personal narratives, academic essays, philosophical reflections, and poetry. We will do lots of writing exercises and keep a Book of Questions. We will do research, write academic and personal reflection essays and research papers, create annotated bibliographies, and give presentations to the class. And our assignments will encourage us to get out and about, look around, investigate, see what we can learn in the field, outside, in places themselves. At the heart of our collective explorations and investigations will be a spirit of curiosity and wonder about our diverse lives on this planet and their deep and surprising connections to the places we live in, travel through, and imagine.

Texts: Sandra Cisneros, THE HOUSE ON MANGO STREET; Alison Bechdel, FUN HOME: A FAMILY TRAGICOMIC; Ruth Ozeki, A TALE FOR THE TIME BEING; Natalie Goldberg, WRITING DOWN THE BONES; Layli Long Soldier, WHEREAS: POEMS.

Credit/Evaluation: Faithful attendance, participation in class discussions and activities, and completion of all individual assignments and group work. Quality of written and creative assignments, including an Autobiographical Essay, a Research Essay and Presentation, and a Book of Questions.

FAIR 202A Core: Humanities/Express Arts Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Feodorov

Description: Throughout history, art has both adorned and justified the lifestyles of the rich and famous. From huge idealized statues of rulers to the often frilly paintings of 18th Century French Rococo, art has both pandered to and titillated the upper classes. However, it is a rash over-simplification to dismiss the entire history of Art as only catering to the tastes of the wealthy and powerful. In this combination seminar and studio class, we will not only investigate how art has been complicit with power, but also how artists and theorists both create and advocate for art that critiques and resists power, voices their experiences and identities, promotes and supports social change, and envisions alternative futures. Students will create 3 visual art projects based upon the themes discussed in class, write response papers to required readings and actively participate in class discussions. Students will also give a presentation in class on an artist whose work fits within the theme of the course. Credit and Evaluation: Evaluation will be based upon regular and attentive attendance, timely and thoughtful completion of all assignments, informed and consistent participation in class discussions, and demonstrated commitment and engagement with their projects. More than three unexcused absences will result in no credit being awarded. No text is required. However, required readings will be made available on Canvas or online. Depending on your project ideas, you may need to invest in some art supplies outside of the minimal amount available in the art room.

FAIR 203A Social Relationshp/Responsibil Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Delucio

Topic: Intersectionality Description: Intersectionality has become a buzzword in academic, social justice, and (increasingly) mainstream discourse. For example, "intersectional feminism" as a term and framework to critique the mainstream feminist movement for lacking an intersectional scope in its praxis. The purpose of this course is to dissect intersectionality and work towards understanding what it means at numerous levels. We will examine the history of the concept including its origins stemming from the experiences of Black women, its academic adoption, and how it is used in social science research. We will discuss how intersectionality fits within the framework(s) of traditional and modern social theory, and how it can serve to expand our sociopolitical understandings of U.S. society. From here, we'll also explore how intersecting societal oppressions can impact our day-to-day lives and our development of self. We will see how we can use an intersectional lens when analyzing popular media (e.g., TV shows, movies, music) to address issues of (mis)representation and appropriation. We will also identify the critiques and limits of intersectionality as a concept and theoretical framework in order to develop a working approach towards improving how we use this concept in thought, language, expression, and experience. Required Texts: Grzanka, P. R. (Ed.). (2014/2018). Intersectionality: A foundations and frontiers reader. New York, NY: Routledge Hill Collins, P. & Bilge, S. (2016). Intersectionality. Malden, MA: Polity Press. Additional readings will be uploaded to Canvas.

Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will include regular attendance (i.e., no more than 3 absences); active and engaged participation in class discussions; 2 response papers; a presentation; and a final research paper.

FAIR 203A Social Relationshp/Responsibil Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Lopez

Topic: Justice as Healing: Indigenous view on the Justice System This class explores theories of social norms through the lens of the Justice System. In this class, we will begin exploring theories and social norms behind our legal and political system, and our current laws. We will pay close attention to how social theories weave through our daily lives in complete anonymity while guiding our every step. Students will engage with big questions about society - what we see as norms, their origins, and their current forms. We will learn about the legal process for arrest, prosecution, and imprisonment. We will also learn about alternatives to our current system based on indigenous ways of Community Peacemaking and Restorative Justice. This class includes a tour of the Whatcom County Jail.

Required Texts: Justice as Healing - Indigenous Ways. Writings on Community Peacemaking and Restorative Justice from the Native Law Center. Editor Wanda D McCaslin. Other readings and videos as provided by instructor.

FAIR 203A Social Relationshp/Responsibil Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Estrada

Theme: Theories and Critiques

This section will explore the process of social identity formation in the United States through the lens of modern social theory.  The goal of the class is to explore multiple perspectives on the formation of the state, individual rights within society, equality as well as the roles and responsibilities of individuals within their respective communities. The focus of the class will concern itself with the roots and application of Western ideals of freedom and equity that arguably form the basis for the United States’ liberal democracy.
The seminar will outline the origins of the enlightenment and the basis for “natural” rights and freedoms in conjunction with the derived roles of society and government. We will then examine how the universalist ideals of the liberal enlightenment have implicitly or explicitly excluded those without property, people of color, and women.  We will also define what the “social compact” has meant in different periods of American history, and the relationship of various groups to this compact. Can liberal democracy really provide equal citizenship for workers, women, and people of color? How have the movements of socialism, reconstruction, decolonization, ethnic identity and feminism tried to reformulate and transform the social order?


Texts:  Selected Readings on John Locke and Adam Smith;
C.Lemert, 6th ed., Social Theory:  The Multicultural &Classic Readings (Westview: Perseus Books, 2013);  M.J. Sandel, Justice: What’s The Right Thing To Do (NY: Farrar, Strauss, Giroux, 2009); Recommended Reading: Zinn, H. People’s History of the United States: 1492-Present, (NY: Harper Collins, 2003)


Requirements for Credit and Criteria for Evaluation:  Credit will be granted for regular attendance, evidence of preparation, satisfactory completion of 2-3 written perspective papers in addition to a group term project and class group presentation. Criteria for evaluation include informed and active engagement in class discussions; informative, relevant group presentation and a term project paper that illustrates a sound grasp of social theory and critical paradigms.

 

FAIR 206A Core:Science/Our Plc on Planet Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Tuxill

FAIR 206A  Science and Our Place on the Planet:  Sustainable Stuff

 

Read the list of ingredients on a cereal box.  Ponder the sleek form and intricate circuitry of a smartphone.  Turn on a light switch, or step on board a new hybrid city bus.  Where do the raw materials and natural resources that make modern life possible come from?  Where, how and by whom are they turned into what anthropologists call our material culture--the stuff we take for granted every day?  And what happens to our stuff once we discard it?

This course examines the global ecological and social impacts of modern consumer demands in the U.S.A. and worldwide.  We will trace the origins of the things we use everyday, and identify the end destinations of our stuff once we no longer have use for it.  Our goals will be three-fold:  1) to study natural resource extraction patterns and global supply chains for raw materials used in modern consumer goods;  2) to identify and quantify the ecological and social impacts of these global supply chains;  and 3)  critically analyze current programs, initiatives, and policies that seek to make consumer goods more sustainable.   Along the way we will gain fluency in foundational concepts that are crucial for understanding sustainability, such as ecosystem functions, the impacts of population versus consumption, lifecycle analysis, the relationship between sustainability and resiliency, and strategies for coping with global ecological change.

Texts and Materials:  Confessions of an Eco-Sinner, by Fred PearceAdditional reading assignments will be drawn from a broad range of academic and applied literature and distributed in PDF format via Canvas.  All reading assignments are due for the class they are listed in the syllabus.

Requirements for Credit and Criteria for Evaluation

As part of the course, students will be expected to:

1)  Do the readings ahead of time.  Come to class prepared to talk about what you read and, with advance notice, present examples and illustrations of concepts from the readings for discussion.

2)  Write a paper on the origin and environmental/social impact of the materials used in a consumer good of your choice.  Papers should be at least 8 pages long, including bibliography. 

3)  Participate in a group presentation on the environmental and social impacts of a category of material goods (e.g. clothing, wheat, consumer electronics).  You will draw on your individual research paper for this group work.

4)  Participate in a follow-up group poster on options for making a category of material goods more sustainable, drawing on a complete life cycle analysis.  The posters produced by the class will be mounted as a display for the public at Fairhaven College.

FAIR 210A World Issues

Credits: 5

Instructor: Schwandt

We are citizens of the world. As global citizens, what do we know and understand about global issues and ourselves in a world faced with complex issues, such as growing economic disparities, fragile democracies, environmental degradation, wars and militarism, civil liberties, racial profiling, and globalization? How do we become intelligently informed? What is our awareness of and participation in local and global efforts for positive social change? This course explores the complex dynamics of our globalized world from a holistic, inter-disciplinary, and transnational perspective. Together we examine multiple world issues, such as global inequality and poverty, food security, human rights, water, energy, population growth, migration, cultural change, and public health, and our individual and community roles as agents of social change on local and global levels. This course is connected to the Wednesday World Issues Forum speaker series. INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL POLITICS by Lamy, Steven; et al. (2017); selected readings for each speaker on Canvas.

FAIR 245 Theory/Structure in Pop Music

Credits: 4

Instructor: Sehman

This course will examine the fundamental concepts of music theory, including reading and writing musical notation, scales, intervals, triads, chord progressions, and musical structure. We will then take the crucial next step of applying theory, to understand how those techniques are used in context to create meaningful, expressive music. We will analyze songs in different styles and genres, chosen by both the instructor and students. The sheet music for these songs will be used as a means for analysis, to better understand the music theory and songwriting techniques used. Through analysis, written responses and discussion of songs, students will be encouraged to refine their ability to clearly and effectively communicate their ideas about music. Focus will also be given to the larger cultural context the songs and artists we examine exist within. A song has many internal structures and meanings. But importantly a song also looks outward, interacting with the culture it exists within. And this is fundamental to our understanding of that music. The goal of this course is to enrich our understanding of the music we interact with, whether it be as listeners, performers or songwriters. No experience with music theory or reading music notation is required. Text: Principles of Music, by Philip Lambert (Oxford University Press) Requirements/Evaluation: Students will be expected to complete all reading and listening assignments, and participate in class discussion that arise from these. There are will also be weekly music theory assignments. Students will analyze and present at least one song to the class during the quarter. Evaluation will be based on successful completion of material and active involvement.

FAIR 246 Mariachi Music/Perform&Culture

Credits: 3

Instructor: Miyake

FAIR 255Y Folk Music Experience

Credits: 2

Instructor: Miyake

Topic: The Ukulele Description: This course combines playing traditional folk music with the study of the contexts in which folk music has evolved. For this quarter, we will do something a little different and study the ukulele, and the music that is played on the ukulele in a number of different musical genres, but especially the music of Hawaii where the uke has its roots. Students will be expected to participate in discussions on readings assigned during the first five weeks of the course. The class will choose several tunes to practice together over the course of the quarter. In addition, each student will also be asked to introduce one song to the class that enriches our knowledge of folk music or the context within which folk music has been written and performed. We will encourage, but will not require, that these songs come from music related to the ukulele, and we will have several ukes on hand for students to play or use in learning to play the ukulele. Students will write a short research paper that forms the basis for their presentation on the song and its context. Students will also be responsible for learning and practicing the songs that are presented to the class, including practice in small groups. Students are encouraged to gain practice at playing one or more folk music instruments during the course, and are invited to join the course even if they are beginners at playing an instrument or if they prefer to just sing. Texts: There will be no one text for this course - readings will be assigned from a variety of sources.

Credit/Evaluation: Regular attendance and participation in our weekly sing, informed participation in class discussions, one short research paper and song presentation, and practicing music in a small group.

FAIR 257V Topic: Basic Sewing and Design

Credits: 4

Instructor: S'eiltin

Title: Basic Sewing and Design Description: This class is designed for the novice as well as intermediate students who want to refine their sewing skills and techniques. The primary focus will be on basic techniques; which will include sewing terms and techniques, fabric selection, repurposing garments and fabric, pattern construction and garment and three-dimensional design. The class will begin with the introduction to sewing equipment and hand sewing techniques. Students will be required to complete approximately four projects. Projects will include the construction of garments and soft-sculpture. Students will be encouraged to take creative risks with the construction and design of garments and fabric sculptures. Required Text: Sewing Basics, All you Need to Know About Machine and Hand Sewing by Sandra Bardwell, Stewart Tabori and Chang Credit/Evaluation: Students will be required to complete approximately four projects. Projects will include the construction of garments and soft-sculpture. Students will be encouraged to take creative risks with the construction and design of garments and fabric sculptures. Students will be evaluated on their timely completion of every project, their ability to take creative risks as well as their efforts and genuine commitment to all class activities and assignments.

FAIR 270H Intro to Audio Recording

Credits: 4

Instructor: Wallace

Introduction to Audio explores the techniques, tools, and technology used in multi-track recording. From a beginner's perspective, this course works to develop the fundamental skills of critical listening, analog signal flow, and basic analog/digital hybrid recording. By examining the various steps in the recording process students will learn the concepts and skills necessary to use studio equipment such as microphones (their characteristics and placement), mixing consoles (explained in detail), hard disk recording, patch bays, signal and effect processors, and headphone systems. Each student is also expected to attend a weekly two-hour small group lab, held in the studio, giving the student a chance to experience multi-track recording in a hands-on manner. Texts: Modern Recording Techniques (9th edition) by David Miles Huber and selected readings from The Audio Expert by Ethan Winer. Excerpts from the Audio Expert text will be available online. Credit/Evaluation: Students will be evaluated through a combination of participation, attendance (lab and lecture), reading assignments, and understanding gained from the material evaluated from a hands-on assessment. Additionally, students will be required to complete a basic tracking session with their lab assistant in the studio as a final project.

FAIR 303A Core:Intrdisc Cncntrtn Sem Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: O Murchu

Prerequisites: FAIR 101A, FAIR 201A, FAIR 203A, FAIR 305A What questions do you want to explore in your Interdisciplinary Concentration? (Are you asking questions, for example, about inequalities, ecology, musical cultures, or performance?) Why are these questions important enough intellectually, politically, socially or professionally to form the basis for your Interdisciplinary Concentration? Your challenge in the Concentration Seminar is a two- or three-fold one. First, you must answer the question of why your concentration matters to your own satisfaction. Second, you want to communicate the reasons why your concentration's questions matter to the mythical "average reader" in your rationale. Third, you must identify the set of courses, independent study projects, internships, or other forms of experiential learning that allow you to explore your underlying questions about your subject in the rest of your time at Fairhaven College. In practical terms, the seminar is designed to assist you with your development and writing of an interdisciplinary concentration. It will serve as a forum for discussion, guidance, and support during the proposal writing process. You will work collaboratively with your seminar, your instructor, and your concentration committee, to write your learning proposal and identify relevant courses and experiences to help you achieve your educational goals. Here are some of the practical questions this seminar will help to address: - What are the appropriate guidelines and requirements involved? - What exactly is it you want to achieve in your degree? - How can your intentions be given effective shape and form? - Who should be on your committee? - How do the parts of your concentration work together conceptually? - What are the best vehicles for your learning? - What should you put in and what should you leave out of your concentration? Text: Handbook on Canvas + Occasional Readings distributed in class Credit/Evaluation: Faithful preparation for and attendance at seminar; Steady work on your proposal; Contributions to the development of your group members' proposals. Credit for the course is granted when your completed committee-approved proposal has been filed with the Fairhaven Records Office and a regular self-evaluation form is submitted to the instructor.

FAIR 305A Writing & Transition Conferenc Required Core

Credits: 3

Instructor: Schwandt

The Writing Portfolio and Transition Conference are Core graduation requirements for all Fairhaven College students. Your Writing Portfolio will be a selective collection of your academic writing and an introductory statement of self-assessment about your writing at this point in your education. It will be reviewed and assessed by your Fairhaven faculty advisor. Your Transition Conference is a constructive mid-point conversation with advising resource people you invite to share your educational plans and collect advice officially moving you from the "Exploratory" stage of Fairhaven's program into the "Concentrated" stage of your educational plans, regardless of your choice of major. You should embark on these requirements when you and your faculty advisor agree you're ready for them. This is not a class, however you must attend one orientation meeting early in the quarter. Details about the orientation meeting schedule will be sent to all enrolled students via email and posted on the FAIR 305A class CANVAS site. In order to receive credit for FAIR 305A you must: 1) Submit your Writing Portfolio prepared according to specifications to be provided at our orientation and on our class Canvas site. 2) Schedule and conduct a Transition Conference which includes writing and circulating a Transition Conference Statement to your invited participants prior to the conference. Additional details and instructions will be provided at our orientation and on our class Canvas site.

FAIR 308 Hip Hop Music and Culture Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Miyake

Students in this course will examine hip hop music and culture as an artistic and social phenomenon with emphasis on historical, economic and political contexts. Discussions will include the social, economic, and cultural conditions that led to the founding of the music in New York City in the 1970s, the historical and continuing co-existence of various hip hop styles and their relationship to the music industry and broader cultural issues, and controversies resulting from the expansion of hip hop music and culture as a commodity for national and global consumption. Our work in this course will focus on the history of social and cultural issues as they relate to hip hop music and culture--it is not meant to be a music appreciation class. It is also the aim of this course to enable students to more clearly understand their own participation in this global music culture and to more closely consider the role of music in their own lives and cultural practices as well as in the lives of others both at home and far away.

Texts: Rap and Hip Hop Culture by Fernando Orejuela (2015), Rap Music and Street Consciousness by Cheryl L. Keyes (2004), and Hip Hop Africa edited by Eric Charry (2012). Texts for this course will also include other articles and book chapters as assigned by the instructor.

Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will take account of regular attendance, evidence of critical reading, engagement in class discussion, one student-led class, and completion of written assignments.

FAIR 311B The American Legal System Society and Individual 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Lopez

**No more than THREE absences allowed if you want to get credit for this class**

Description: An in-depth look at the American legal system and how it affects individuals and society, with coverage of legal vocabulary, sources of law, the structure of the government, the Supreme Court and the judicial system. Case analysis skills will be stressed, including identifying the issue, procedural history, facts, reasoning and holding of each case. Students will also engage in a mock trial. This class (or PLSC 311) is required for the Law, Diversity and Justice concentration (major) and minor. It serves as a foundational course for anyone interested in learning about law in the U.S.

Assignments May Include: In person court observation, group projects, case briefing, presentations in class, mock trial, paper writing, legal research and leading class discussion.

Learning Objectives: --To introduce students to the role and importance of the judicial system in American government, including federal and state legal systems, with an emphasis on the U.S. Supreme Court --To help students develop critical thinking skills, including an analysis of how systemic inequalities may be replicated by the existing legal systems --To become knowledgeable about the sources and hierarchy of law, with a focus on common law and the doctrine of stare decisis by following a line of precedent on a specific theme --To introduce students to basic legal research, including the use of legal databases, as well as writing case briefs, with an ability to identify procedural history, facts, issue(s), analysis, holding(s) and dicta --To become familiar with the basics of civil law and criminal law, specifically, and basic legal vocabulary in general --Through a mock trial, to help students develop public presentation and advocacy skills.

Text:

Edited Case Book available from the Bookstore.

FAIR 334C International Human Rights Society and Individual 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Akinrinade

Description: This course examines the idea of human rights, its historical, philosophical and legal origins. It explores the notion of universal rights and examines the relativity debate. It will introduce students to rights that are guaranteed and selective substantive rights will be examined - civil and political rights; economic, social and cultural rights, and other classes of rights. Other considerations include national, regional and international institutions created to supervise implementation of and compliance with those rights. It will also consider the role of non-governmental organizations and activists who seek to enforce human rights.

Text: TEXTBOOK ON INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS, by Smith, Rhona K. M.

Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will take account of regular attendance, evidence of critical reading, engagement in class discussion, the quality of short reactions, and two assignments. There will be no course credit for anyone who misses three (3) classes in the quarter.

 

FAIR 335C Multicultural Psychology Society and Individual 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Delucio

Description: Multicultural Psychology is a field that seeks to understand how variability among different cultural groups within the U.S. can offer insight into viable models of everyday experiences. We will explore how multiculturalism is viewed as a fourth "force" in psychology and how it impacts both research and applied aspects in the field. Historically, multicultural psychology has had a primary focus on racial identity within the U.S. context. However, there is increasing recognition of the need to understand how social identities exist in relation to one another; as such, we will examine the intersections between race, gender, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, ability, and other social/marginalized group memberships. We will be examining questions such as the following: What is multiculturalism and what does it take to define something as "multicultural"? How does someone's intention factor in when considering the impact of race-related comments? What are possible impacts of stereotypes on academics, employment, and parenting? In addition, we will explore differences in worldviews (e.g., individualism v. collectivism), means of communication, cultural identity development, acculturation, ways to build multicultural competence, and critiques of the field. Emphasis will be placed on empirical research and psychological theory, aimed at helping you develop competence and knowledge when discussing many real-word examples and events.

Required Texts: Mio, J., Barker, L., & Domenech-Rodriguez, M. (Eds.). (2015). Multicultural psychology: Understanding our diverse communities (4th ed.). Oxford University Press. Tatum, B. D. (2017). Why are all the Black kids sitting together in the cafeteria? And other conversations about race (2nd ed). Basic Books: New York. Additional readings will be uploaded to Canvas

Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will include regular attendance (i.e., no more than 3 absences); active and engaged participation in class discussions; facilitating discussion about an assigned article; 2 reflective papers; a final literature review about a topic related to multicultural psychology.

FAIR 336V Art and Self Portraiture Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Feodorov

(Please note that this is a 300-level studio art course. Prior experience in drawing and two-dimensional art-making is encouraged since the course assumes students have already developed basic art-making skills.)

Description: Most people might think of a portrait as the physical likeness of an individual, created possibly as a memento of someone we care about, or as a visual record of someone famous. However, around the world and throughout the ages, portraiture has been used for numerous other purposes. For example, in ancient Egypt, portraiture played an important role in guaranteeing immortality in the after-life. In the early to mid-20th century artists, influenced by the writings of Sigmund Freud, sought to uncover a deeper and "truer" psychological (and for some, "spiritual") essence of humanity lurking behind our superficial physical exteriors. Today, portraiture continues to play a vital role in our daily lives, whether it takes the form of a photo on a student ID card, a posed family portrait hanging in our parent's living room, or as a "selfie" on our Facebook page. In this combination studio/seminar course we will experiment with self-portraiture through painting, drawing, and digital photography. While we will focus on intermediate skill development, we will also delve into more conceptual territory by considering how our personal and social environments influence who we are, how we see ourselves, and how others may see us.

Credit and Evaluation: Students will complete at least 4 artworks in class and 4 artworks outside of class. They will also turn in a sketchbook of at least 40-pages and participate in workshops and class discussions. Evaluation will be based upon attendance, informed participation in discussions, and demonstrated commitment and engagement with their projects.

No text is required. However, required readings will be made available on Canvas or online. Students must provide a large 18 x 24 inch drawing pad (no newsprint!), various art supplies (to be specified later), and a sketchbook no smaller than 9 x 12 inches. A suggested materials list will be provided at least a week before classes begin. You may require other materials as you develop ideas for your projects.

FAIR 338P Clt/Biol Prspc of Preg/Chldb Science and Our Place on the Planet 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Schwandt

This course seeks to understand cultural and biological aspects of pregnancy and childbirth. We will study reproductive biology, the biological and psychological changes women experience during pregnancy and childbirth, the development of the fetus, and the evolution of pregnancy and childbirth. We will pay special attention to the ways American medicine has viewed and treated childbirth, and will explore the recent changes in American childbirth practices including a comparison of the midwifery model of care and the medical model. Other topics will include assisted reproductive technologies and a cross-cultural perspective on pregnancy and birth. Students will participate in a quarter-long "pregnancy game" in which they will manage a fictional pregnancy. Students will research and make and explain decisions based on complications or situations that arise in their pregnancies. Videos and field trips to the Bellingham Birth Center and the St. Joseph Hospital Birthing Center will augment discussions.

Texts: Sandra Steingraber: HAVING FAITH: AN ECOLOGIST'S JOURNEY TO MOTHERHOOD Tina Cassidy: BIRTH: THE SURPRISING HISTORY OF HOW WE ARE BORN Additional reading will be assigned from various sources.

Requirements for credits and criteria for evaluation: Regular attendance in class, informed participation in class discussions, weekly 500 word "pregnancy game" report and/or written reflections to class readings, and 2 drafts of a 2500 page research paper.

FAIR 345A Prin of Soc Entrepreneurship

Credits: 4

Instructor: Coulet du Gard

Prerequisite: Fair 203 Social Relationship/Responsibility, or other social theory and responsibility introductory class approved by instructor, or Fair 387K Grant Writing. Course Description: This course will cover the principles and practices of social entrepreneurship. The emphasis is on understanding systems changes to improve the lives of people and the planet in the face of current local and global issues. The course will analyze current efforts to address and solve these problems by social entrepreneurs. We will take a careful look at intentional communities organizing, coordinating, and cooperating within a number of different models. These models, found throughout the world, exhibit modalities ranging from the nonprofit (non governmental) model to cooperatives, non-monetary systems of barter, to systems reducing their budgets on annual basis (the opposite of the monetary growth model.) Through readings, discussions, films, and possible guest lecturers, students will gain an understanding of social entrepreneurs at work. Social entrepreneurs are change agents who improve systems by creating and implementing new, positive solutions in communities experiencing societal and environmental problems. This course is interdisciplinary and practical. It requires interactive discussion, careful reading of materials, and the desire on the student's part to make a difference in this world. Students enrolling in this course, at least for this quarter, will be considered "change makers." Essays, discussions, and the final project will all revolve around "creating good work." Outcomes - upon completion of the course, students will be able to:

--Identify various theories and practices of social entrepreneurship --Analyze examples of social entrepreneurial solutions --Explain how social entrepreneurship creates innovative and proven solutions by comparing them to markets and governments which are often ineffective systems to people and the environment --Evaluate characteristics of social entrepreneurial organizations such as management practices and stakeholder needs and abilities. --Appreciate the role of empathy for all people --Engage in an active learning process, involving interaction with other students --Challenge students to be the change they wish to see, exchanging "I" for "We." Texts and Materials: 1.Bornstein, David and Susan Davis Social Entrepreneurship: What Everyone Needs to Know 2010 (available free through WWU library online) [SE] 2.Rodriguez-Heyman, Darian, ed. Nonprofit Management 101 2011 (available free through WWU library online [NM]

3.Wiley, Margaret and Deborah Frieze Walk Out Walk On 2011. [WO] available in the WWU Bookstore, cost about $30 new. 4.Canvas online documents and links including PowerPoints, videos, articles. Credit/Evaluation: --Students will be expected to write 3 essays of 500 words each --participate in class discussions of assigned readings --lead one discussion during the quarter (probably in tandem with another student depending on enrollment) --complete a final project, presentation or paper relating to social entrepreneurship -- and attend classes regularly -no more than 3 missed classes will be allowed in this class. I will be taking daily attendance and writing down notes on participatory interactions.

FAIR 370I Introduction to Pro Tools

Credits: 4

Instructor: Wallace

Prerequisites: 270H (before or during) or permission of instructor This class will introduce students to mixing and editing audio with Avid's Pro Tools 12 software. Covered topics will include: importing and recording audio into Pro Tools, editing and manipulating performances, MIDI, the use of plug-ins, and an overview of mixing processes such as compression/limiting, dithering and equalization. As this is primarily a mixing class, having already recorded material is useful but not required. Students will be expected to attend class regularly and demonstrate critical listening skills through critique of their classmates' work. Additionally, the Fairhaven Mixing Suite will be available for use all quarter and required for certain projects. Texts: Reprinted materials. Credit/Evaluation: Projects will be evaluated throughout the quarter by the instructor and the other members of the class.

FAIR 370J Studio Recording

Credits: 4

Instructor: Fish

Prerequisite: FAIR 370I or FAIR 370P Studio Recording I takes the concepts introduced in Intro to Audio and Intro to Pro Tools and allows the student to apply and practice them in a hands-on manner, with the goal of becoming familiar with and competent in the use of the equipment in the Champion St Studio. Students will complete at least four multi-track recording projects and will have the opportunity to work on other recording sessions as well. Through the students' work on these projects they will learn efficiency and speed in the techniques of tracking, overdubbing, and mixdown sessions. The recording projects will be evaluated by the instructor as well as the other students in the class. This course will also involve development of critical listening skills as well as the creative and imaginative expression possible in audio recording. Students will keep a detailed journal of their session work. This is a Pro Tools based course and enrolled students will gain access to the Fairhaven Studio, Mixing Suite, and Champion St Studios. Texts: The Recording Engineer's handbook (3rd edition) by Owsinski Credit/Evaluation: Each student must finish the assigned projects which will be critiqued by the instructor and peers based on sound quality, balance, clarity and realization. Overall evaluation will be made based on effort, participation and growth as an engineer.

FAIR 370K Advanced Studio Recording

Credits: 4

Instructor: Fish

Prerequisite: FAIR 370J or FAIR 370H This class will give students with advanced recording experience the opportunity to record and mix on an industry standard Pro Tools 12 HD system. Students will enhance their knowledge of Pro Tools and learn how to use this software in conjunction with a large-format analog mixing console. Topics such as drum sample replacement, audio quantization, convolution impulse responses, spectrum analysis, DSP processing and other advanced topics will be covered. Students will be expected to conduct at least three recording/mixing sessions throughout the quarter and prepare a final portfolio for in-class critique. Students will also learn how to properly configure Pro Tools HD hardware and software components, how to setup session templates and how to utilize each component of an HD/analog system. Enrolled students will gain access to the Fairhaven Studio, Mixing Suite, and Champion St Studios. Texts: Reprinted materials Credit/Evaluation: Projects will be evaluated throughout the quarter by the instructor and the other students.

FAIR 380A Music Production Composition

Credits: 4

Instructor: Sehman

Formerly Music Production Using Reason Prerequisite: FAIR 270H Sound Design and Composition Using Reason -Please note: No experience is necessary with music composition, music production or the software, Reason. This course intends to engage students at whatevever experience level they enter. This course will focus on creating music using the software, Reason. We will learn the essential operations of that program, with the goal of empowering students to create music of any style and form, be it pop songs, experimental sound works, beat making, ambient music, or spoken word pieces. By the end of this course students will have a portfolio of 4-5 compositions. This course will also focus on the creative process and how it relates to music production. As a group we will explore common practices, workflow and roadblocks in the creative process, with the goal of strengthening each class member's individual creative voice. Topics will include: -Modular synthesis: Learning the essentials of oscillators, filters, LFOs, and ADSR envelopes in order to create a personal sound language. -Using pre-composed loops as an empowering tool to supplement compositional technique and language. -Incorporating samples into music: to expand or comment on the work of other artists, or perhaps to

incorporate the voices of important figures (e.g. the speeches of Martin Luther King, Jr.) -Song orchestration: an examination of the functional and timbral layers of a song, and how they work

to create the total sonic entity of a song. -Song structure: a study of the linear construction of music as a way to create a meaningful narrative and flow. -The fundamentals of beat making: examining drum machines, step sequencers, and the basic kick/snare/high hat texture of representative drum beat styles. Text: Making Music: Creative Strategies for Electronic Music Producers, by Dennis Desantis. Requirements/Evaluation: Students will complete 4-5 music composition projects. Students will be expected to actively pursue musical creation in this class. Evaluation will be based on the student's active involvement with their own work and engagement with the class, not the style or skill level of their creative work.

FAIR 381G Counternarratives Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Friedland

Counternarratives: Memory and Resistance in Literature In this class, we will read and discuss how contemporary authors are challenging History. We will look at works that juxtapose official history with unofficial history, personal suffering with public censorship, and investigate literature's capacity to redeem the human record. Literature often resists official discourse and usurps and supplants dominant narratives with compelling counternarratives. Maxine Hong Kingston famously wrote in her memoir, "I am a reflection of my mother's secret poetry and hidden angers," challenging not just personal history but an entire identity of assimilation and oppression that marked her family's immigration experience. Audre Lorde coined the term biomythography, "combining elements of autobiography, the novel, and personal mythology," thereby allowing historical absences to become opportunities for resistance. Most recently John Keene undertook a literary counter-archeology in his collection of novellas, Counternarratives, writing through speculative fiction, newspaper clippings and archival research to unveil the inner lives of those erased by Western slave history and colonial representations from the 17th century to the present day. This class will be useful for students interested in documentary writing, memory studies, oral history and literatures of resistance.

Texts: John Keene: Counternarratives Karen Tei Yamashita: Letters to Memory Svetlana Alexievich: Voices of Chernobyl CD Wright: One Big Self

Criteria for Evaluation: Active participation in class discussions. Faithful attendance. One presentation and final writing portfolio that includes a critical preface and selections from your own counternarratives. This course includes creative writing and critical reflection assignments.

 

FAIR 381G Big History and Creative Writing Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Simon

What is the universe? What is it made of? How does it work? How did our planet and solar system form? How did humans come to be? And why? Artists and writers have always pondered such questions and explored their meanings in their work.

Likewise, the young transdisciplinary field of Big History is an attempt by thinkers in many disciplines to weave a metanarrative from the sum of human knowledge that explains reality and frames human existence. Big Historians consider the origin and history of the universe itself; of galaxies, stars, and the complex chemical elements forged in their furnaces; of our solar system and earth; the evolution of life and the human species; the history of humans and human civilization to the present day - and, ultimately, what the recurrent patterns in the story may suggest about possible futures. What better way to consider what this all means than through creative writing?

In this course, we will explore the Big History metanarrative and engage it through creative writing practice in various genres. You might write a poem about the birth of a planet, a dialogue between two subatomic particles, a short story about a romance between Homo sapiens and Homo neanderthalensis, a song sung from the point of view of a civilization in transition from agrarian to industrial, or a teenager crossing the Bering land bridge from Asia to North America, 15,000 years ago. What was the New Horizons probe thinking as it flew past Pluto on July 14, 2015? How did Pluto feel? How does Earth feel about humans? Or about the moon?

We'll read a Big History account, such as David Christian's Maps of Time or Cynthia Stokes Brown's Big History: From the Big Bang to the Present. We'll also look at written creative work that engages this story or incorporates its elements. We'll use elemental analysis to understand how writing works, and to critique each other's writing in constructive, friendly workshop.

Credit/evaluation: writing assignments including analyses of and creative responses to published works; 2-3 major creative works; possible revision; regular class attendance and participation, particularly during written and oral workshop/critique of classmates' work.

Texts: TBA. Will include a Big History account such as Christian's Maps of Time, Brown's Big History, Eric Chaisson's Cosmic Evolution, or Fred Spier's Big History and the Future of Humanity. Additional works in fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction, drama, will be provided by the instructor.

 

FAIR 386E Cinema and Nationalism Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: O Murchu

Nationalism – the idea that shared cultural identity, geographic territory, and political sovereignty should fit together – was a dominant ideology of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and used by colonized peoples to fight against imperial control. Movies set in the past from post-colonial (or still colonized) nations are often celebrations of, and critical reflections on, the national past and present. This course examines how narrative movies from several (post)colonial try to narrate versions of the national past. Do these movies reinforce official history and ideology of state and industry and the class interests of funders and distributors? Or can narrative cinema engage audiences in rethinking national stories?  In this course, we examine films from Palestine (3000 Nights; When I Saw You), Korea (Welcome to Dongmakgol; Ode to My Father); Ireland (The Wind that Shakes the Barley); The United States (Malcom X); India (Mr. and Mrs. Iyer); Burkina Faso (Night of Truth); Iran (A Separation); and Chile (Machuca), to see how movies construct stories about the national past and the national or international present. We will also learn how to “write” videographically by using clips from movies as interpretive evidence for our analyses of the movies we watch.

Class time is structured to screen one feature movie each week, and to hold longer video editing training workshops. This class is a hands-on workshop in videographic criticism – the practice of using video editing software to visually analyze films. Mark Miller, Fairhaven’s media manager, will introduce all of the participants to the software and skills required to analyze movies videographically through five formal exercises. We will practice a variety of formal video editing and essaying exercises on the movies we watch: 1) a videographic pechakucha; 2) an unscripted voiceover; 3) an alternative trailer; 4) a multiscreen composition; and 5) a videographic epigraph. After we collectively experiment videographically on a set of five films, students will be encouraged to create their own video essays as final term projects.

Texts

For purchase at the AS Bookstore & available through Western Library:

  • Bruce Cumings. The Korean War: A History. (NY: Modern Books, 2011).
  • Christian Keathley and Jason Mittell. The Videographic Essay: Criticism in Sound and Image. Montreal: Caboose, 2016
  • Malcolm X with Alex Haley. The Autobiography of Malcolm X. NY: Grove, 1965.

Articles and chapters by Craig Calhoun, Anne McClintock, Nadia Yaqub, and others are available online through Western Library as Ebook Chapters or through article databases.  Links will be posted on canvas.

FAIR 403A Advanced Seminar Required Core

Credits: 4

Instructor: Akinrinade

Subject: This course, in your final quarter at Fairhaven College, provides an opportunity for reflection on your education. The class provides a supportive community for the summary and critical reflection process, whether you pursued a WWU major or a Fairhaven concentration. The final output will be a Summary and Evaluation (S & E) of your Fairhaven education. Through this S & E, you will reflect on your educational choices and their consequences, identify unifying trends, articulate the meaning of significant ideas and experiences, and note the gaps that remain. The course offers time to look forward, consider possibilities and challenges of your chosen community and/or occupation, and to examine questions of social responsibility and activism in relation to your education and future aspirations. This course is a collaborative effort, involving intensive writing, continuous conversation, presentations and active listening to each other. Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will take account of regular attendance, engagement in class discussions and active collaboration in the Summary and Evaluation writing process, and a Summary and Evaluation document submitted at the end of the quarter. There will be no course credit for anyone who misses three (3) classes in the quarter. Text: Hilberg, Raul: The Politics of Memory: The Journey of a Holocaust Historian (1996)

FAIR 403A Advanced Seminar Required Core

Credits: 4

Instructor: Calderon

ANNE TREAT, Spring 2007 grad, said: "There is no possible way I can give justice to the complexity of experiences, triumphs, pitfalls and challenges of my academic career in the course of this paper. This artifact of self-reflection is simply a pause in the broader conversation of my academic journey, an invitation for me to mindfully articulate the ways those things I've studied, read, discussed and experienced over the past four years have informed and challenged my personal development, and how I've chosen to integrate and express that knowledge through the actions of my life" This seminar is a wonderful opportunity to reflect on what you have been up to all these years of being educated--through writing, conversation, presentations, and listening to each other. You will read and discuss a book and other readings, co-facilitating at least one discussion; write and share a variety of short writing assignments, designed to help you complete your Summary and Evaluation, and provide a supportive community in which to summarize and critically reflect upon your Fairhaven (or Life) education. Each student will also present or teach something to the class from the heart of his or her educational experience. This course is one of our favorites to teach at Fairhaven because we learn so much about our students, and the many intriguing, complex, deep, creative and quirky ways there are to be human and to become educated. The class also illustrates the value of writing as a process of discovery, synthesis and meaning. We will all do our best to help you express most clearly what your education has been about, and are honored to learn from your stories, your minds, your creativity, and your lives. The course will be as significant as you make it. Be honest. It is your life, your education, so let us understand what it has meant and what it really means to you now.

FAIR 412E Adv Tpcs Law Domestic Violence Society and Individual 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Helling

In this course we will explore the ways in which the U.S. legal system responds (or doesn't respond) to domestic violence.

Why is there so much violence within homes?

Has the criminal justice system learned to take this violence seriously? Which responses are effective and which are not? How do factors such as race, gender and immigration play a role in the responses by the legal system? The professor is a passionate former domestic violence prosecutor who handled thousands of DV cases in a major metropolitan area. We will look at criminal law through the reading of court cases.

We will also look at civil law and the process of getting orders for protection (including observing court).

This course is particularly suited to anyone interested in domestic violence, the criminal justice system or going to law school.

You do NOT need to be a Fairhaven student to take this course.

LDJ concentrators and LDJ minors are particularly welcome!

Credit/evaluation: no more than three absences active and informed participation by keeping up with the heavy reading load, prepare case briefs on each case, one polished ten to fifteen-page research paper on your choice of topics involving domestic violence and the law (followed by an oral presentation to the class on the topic). Also, you will need to watch 10 hours of court proceedings outside of class time. Texts: Course Manual plus Readings on Hein Online and Nexis Nasheba Barzey, The Strength Within: The Link Between Domestic Violence And Immigration Recommended: Barron's Law Dictionary Learning Objectives: 1)Increase understanding of the U.S. Legal System and critiques of that system, with an emphasis on the distinction between civil and criminal proceedings. 2)Increase comprehension of court opinions through the writing of case briefs. 3)Increase the ability to research and analyze case law and law review articles, including the use of Nexis and Hein Online. 4)Increase the ability to formulate a valid argument in writing and orally, and the ability to use relevant and credible sources in order to support that argument. 5)Increase awareness of the many facets of domestic violence, including its scope, community responses to it, and the roles of various actors in the legal and human services sectors.

FAIR 414D Race/Class/&Public Education Society and Individual 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Pierce

Race, Class, and Public Education Prerequisite: Admission to Fairhaven College The public education system in the U.S. has historically been considered the great "leveling" institution--one of only places people from all racial, ethnic, and class backgrounds have the best chance of achieving "the American Dream". But what if this story about public education in the U.S. has never been true? How would we re-evaluate the public education in the U.S. if we viewed this official history against the grain, from the standpoint of communities who have systematically remained racially stigmatized and economically disadvantaged in U.S. society despite access to public education? In exploring these and related questions, this class takes a historical and philosophical approach to reassess the goals and aims of the public education system in the U.S. by drawing on the Black Radical Tradition as well as decolonial and Marxist thinkers. The primary goals of this course are twofold. First, to gain a better understanding of who the public education system in the U.S. was designed to serve and in what ways. The second goal will be to link this analysis to contemporary debates and controversies around antiblackness and education, the preservation and persistence of white supremacy U.S. society and culture, and indigenous education movements rooted in decolonial projects. The course will also focus on how marginalized communities have created and practiced resistive models of education in the U.S. that point to alternative ways of learning and being in society outside of these power dynamics.

Learning Outcomes: Ability to critically evaluate democratic assumptions of the public education system; draw connections between white supremacy, colonization, and capitalism to the design of public schooling; gain competency in areas of research such as the Black Radical Tradition and decolonial thinkers. Students will also write a research paper on a chosen topic that examines a contemporary example of colonial and racial legacies in the K-12 school system.

Required Texts: TBA, most likely supplied via course Canvas page.

Credit/Evaluation: Participation in class discussion and regular attendance; timely and thoughtful completion of course readings and writing assignments; quality of writing assignments that use evidence from course readings; quality of student presentations; critical and respectful engagement in class.