Courses

Fairhaven College Course Descriptions

Below you will find our current course descriptions.  Previous quarter course descriptions are also available by selecting the quarter and year you are searching for.  Electronic course descriptions are available back to winter 2009.  For information on days and times as well as location please visit Classfinder.  To register for these classes log into Web4U. Important information about registration including deadlines and fees can be found on the Registrar's Office page.  For any questions about these course descriptions or for assistance with registration please call the Fairhaven College Office at 360-650-6680. For information on Fairhaven College Wait List Policies click here.

Fairhaven College Core Requirements:

Classes determined to satisfy a Fairhaven Core requirement will be identified using the following icons: 

Required Core  Humanities and the Expressive Arts II
Science and Our Place on the Planet II Society and Individual II

Non-Fairhaven Students

Most Fairhaven classes open to all WWU students who meet the prerequisites in Phase II of registration.

FAIR 101A Intro Interdisciplinary Study

Credits: 1

Instructor: McClure

This class aims to introduce students to Fairhaven College resources, practices, processes and possibilities in their first quarter of enrollment in our program. Our class activities will include small group workshops, introductions to Fairhaven resources and people, community-based activities and individual advising. We will introduce the educational practices used at Fairhaven (Writing Portfolio; Transition Conference; Independent Study, Interdisciplinary Concentration, Narrative Evaluations...) and share the essentials you need to proceed toward your chosen major and take charge of your education.

Texts: There are no textbooks. Course materials provided in class and on Canvas.

Credit/Evaluation: This Fairhaven College Core Class is a graduation requirement. Award of credit will be based on documented attendance, participation and completion of assignments as indicated in the class syllabus. Bring your your curiosity, your questions and your active engagement. The learning outcomes for FAIR 101a include understanding resources, degree pathways, requirements and pedagogy that are the mission and practice at Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies.

FAIR 201A Critical & Reflective Inquiry

Credits: 5

Instructor: Tag

Fair 201A: Critical and Reflective Inquiry: Words

Were you thinking that those were the words, those upright lines? those curves, angles, dots? / No, those are not the words, the substantial words are in the ground and sea, / They are in the air, they are in you.-- Walt Whitman Words, words, words. This course is a celebration of -- an immersion in, an exploration of, a wallowing in, an investigation of -- the world of words. What we say, what we hear, how we think -- nearly all of it is filtered in some way through the medium of words, spoken and unspoken. We will examine the amazing power of words to seduce, to name, to cajole, to threaten, to heal, to hurt, and to inspire. We will follow the sometimes strange and illuminating paths of word roots, as well as challenge ourselves to coin new words out of the vital and vibrant stuff of our lives. We will engage in wordplay and word games, in the fun of puns, the twang of slang, the bargain of jargon, and in the prime-time grime and chime of rhyme. At the heart of it all will be the words themselves -- tangible though elusive, delicious though common, electric though silent. This is a course for those of us who want to get inside the words we use every day, who want to see the beauty and power in what we say to each other, in what we write, and in what we sometimes lose at the tip of our tongues and sometimes find in the vast word-hoards of our minds. We will read dictionaries. We will scan newspapers, magazines, poems, advertisements, the Internet, and books for words that seem intriguing, puzzling, wild, essential, dangerous, and keys to understanding the world we live in. We will eavesdrop, listening for the rhythms and cadences and odd and common ways words are strung together in speech. We will investigate, research, and think about words, dream about words, eat our words, and write our own word histories and essays, perform our spoken words, and make our own personal dictionaries. Texts: BLOOMING ENGLISH by Burridge; LOOK by Sharif; OBLITERATIONS by O'Neill and Piazza; WE SHOULD ALL BE FEMINISTS by Adichie; WORD WARRIORS: 35 WOMEN LEADERS IN THE SPOKEN WORD REVOLUTION ed. by Olson

Credit / Evaluation: Faithful attendance, completion of all the readings, participation in class discussions, activities, and all individual and group work. Quality of written assignments, including a Name Essay, a Taboo Word Essay, a Research Essay and Presentation, a Personal Keyword Project, and a Spoken Word Poetry Performance.

FAIR 201A Critical & Reflective Inquiry

Credits: 5

Instructor: Brown

Doing, Being, Becoming

What happens when we center the body as a site of knowledge production and meaning making? How can we use the senses, embodiment, movement, and more to better understand the embedded politics of space, identity, and everyday life? This course is an introduction to the field of Performance Studies. Performance Studies is an interdisciplinary field that draws on anthropology, cultural studies, gender studies, critical race theory, and more and uses performance to look beyond the stage to mine the historical, social, cultural, and political constructs of our day to day lives. We will look at storytelling, folklore, digital media, political speeches, rituals, celebrations, everyday behavior, objects, environments--all of which communicate and enact certain values, beliefs, and messages that shape what we see, what we think, and how we act. By learning to analyze these structures, students will be able to apprehend and intervene upon their own positionality. In addition, performance studies believes in embodied learning, so we will apply key theories to sites and events through hands-on assignments.

FAIR 201A Critical & Reflective Inquiry

Credits: 5

Instructor: Lopez

Indigenous Women of The World: Myths, Legends, and Herstories

Have you ever wondered who are the woman warriors, goddesses, princesses, and hags in legends and myths? What do Native American, Mayan, Andean, Celtic, and African women share in common? How they differ? Are they still alive? In this course, we will travel through history and the world to explore the different social expressions of Women through time and world regions.  We will explore the cultural, political, economic, and legal factors that re-defined the roles of woman.  In this class we will read and trace the evolution of the herstories of women through works of “fiction”, story-telling, song, poetry, and more.

Credit and Evaluation:

As part of this course, participants will develop their personalized academic “Editing Checklist” based their own writing strengths and weaknesses.

Students are expected to engage with the materials in a critical manner.  Class participation is required. We will have short paper assignments for content and editing, a journal to record your findings and reactions, a “final” Editing Checklist, and a 10-page final academic paper.

Required Texts:   

Legal Writing in Plain English. Author: Bryan Garner.  ISBN-13: 978-0226283937

ISBN-10: 0226283933.

Women in Celtic Myth: Tales of Extraordinary Women from the Ancient Celtic Tradition

And others readings as assigned by the professor.

FAIR 201A Critical & Reflective Inquiry

Credits: 5

Instructor: Takagi

Fair 201a/203a (Linked) Coming to America

Do you want to think about migration to America, free or forced and including colonial settlement, personally, creatively, and through research and social theory? Do you want to satisfy your critical and reflective inquiry (201a) and social relationships and responsibilities (203a) requirements in a block course with expert faculty and diverse peers? If so, please read on.

The phrase “Coming to America” often conjures up the image of tired, hungry and poor immigrants standing on a ship’s deck mesmerized by Lady Liberty while arriving at Ellis Island. Nowadays, a newcomer might arrive at John F. Kennedy Airport in New York City, be hidden deep in the bowels of a cargo ship inside a container originally built for boxes and dock along the seacoast, or ride a freight train to the country’s border and then walk. This course examines the historical and contemporary journeys and experiences of individuals, families, and social groups who “came” to this country. The word “came” is in quotation marks because not every arrival was desired or planned; in the 1700s, West Africans were kidnapped and forcibly shipped to these shores never to see their families or homelands again.

Does every newcomer experience a sense of bewilderment, loss, and confusion, and how do they eventually gather the spiritual and emotional energy to find their bearings and begin life again?  How have newcomers’ experiences varied, including perhaps your own families’?  What obstacles have they faced and opportunities have they created to survive and, ideally,  thrive in this land? 

To help you gain personal and historical understanding, do research and analyze various sources, we will (as a class) learn to critically read different “texts” (this includes written, aural, and visual), engage in deep discussions (“seminaring”), conduct research at the library, do oral interviews, and write papers on how your families came to this country.   Do you want to develop your personal (educational autobiography, migration story), research (annotated bibliography, question, documented paper), and expository (textual analysis) writing skills in one streamlined course?  

Social and political theory invites us to think about the meaning, criteria, benefits, and burdens of membership in modern societies? Was the United States more equal than European societies because it lacked an aristocracy and rigid class structures? Or is domination and subordination reproduced and inscribed in American society between settlers and natives, planters and slaves, “Whites” and people of color, men and women, Protestants  and Catholics or Christians and Muslims, straights and queers in other ways that are linked to our past and present (im)migrations?

Course Benefits: 1) Deep personal and intellectual relationships with your peers and professors; 2) integration of personal and political learning and personal and academic genres of writing and expression; 3) balanced load of reading, research, and writing assignments across the course of the quarter. Develop your personal (educational autobiography, migration story), research (annotated bibliography, question, documented paper), and expository (textual analysis) writing skills in one streamlined course.  

Possible Texts

David Gerber, American Immigration: A Very Short Introduction

Reyna Grande, The Distance Between Us

Hiroshi Motomura, Immigration Outside the Law (2014)

Harsha Walia, Undoing Border Imperialism (2013)

Credit/Evaluation: 1) Faithful Attendance – you may not miss more than two classes, except in exceptional circumstances, to receive credit; 2) engaged, spirited and civil participation; 3) an educational autobiography; 3) all of the steps of a multi-stage quarter long research project: i) a battery of research questions; ii) a list of sources; iii) a paper outline; iv) expositions of migration theorists’ ideas; v) an annotated bibliography; vi) a full paper draft; vii) a group presentation; viii) a final paper

How to register: Eligible students can get registration codes for both 201A and 203A from Anna Blick (Anna.Blick@wwu.edu) or Jackie McClure (Jackie.McClure@wwu.edu). Both sections must be taken together as class time will flow between both courses. Students must simultaneously register for the following CRNs after receiving override permission from Fairhaven College: 44034 and 44035

FAIR 201A Critical & Reflective Inquiry

Credits: 5

Instructor: Tuxill

The Garden and The Wild

How do people make sense of their relationship with the natural world? We will explore this question using two seemingly opposed conceptual models: the garden, a natural space shaped by human hands for material and aesthetic purposes; and wilderness, the untrammeled reaches of the earth where people may visit but not inhabit. In this course we will investigate gardens and wilderness as physical and philosophical landscapes, each one reflecting a wide diversity of human experiences and ideals. How have peoples' notions about gardens and the wild changed over time and across different cultural contexts? What do people seek in such places and spaces today? Is it possible to garden in the wilderness--indeed, might that be a first step towards truly calling a place home?

Engaging these and many other questions will require us to hone a variety of ecological, historical, and analytical perspectives. As the first course in Fairhaven's core curriculum, this seminar is built upon critical and reflective thinking, reading, and writing. Poetry, science, philosophy, and policy will all inform our discussions, as we read and listen to different people about the meaning and sustenance (both literal and metaphorical) they derive from gardens and the wild. We also will take the time to learn experientially, whether venturing amid forests and mountain peaks or digging our hands in the dirt at our doorstep.

Texts: Reading assignments will be drawn from a broad range of academic and applied literature and distributed primarily in PDF format.

Credit/Evaluation: As part of the seminar format of this course, you will be asked to demonstrate your learning in several different ways, including contributing actively to class discussions and reflecting on what you are learning. You will write a formal research paper, and give a presentation to your classmates about your findings. You also will write a personal learning narrative, and develop a writing plan by quarter's end that identifies and assesses the strengths and areas for improvement in your writing.

FAIR 201A Critical & Reflective Inquiry

Credits: 5

Instructor: Rowe

Information Overload

This section explores the information explosion, the need to critically evaluate competing messages, and the importance of developing effective expressions of our own views. We will consider the plethora of technological innovations for conveying our words and how we manage them (or do they manage us?). We will entertain concomitant themes of credibility, diversity, and relevance in what we take in and consider how to apply such concerns to our own writing.

Our primary reading stimulates discussion with such questions as: Is free speech endangered on campus? Is American immigration working? Is the criminal justice system broken? What does marriage mean today? The essays written on different perspectives of these and other timely issues will help us hone our critical reading skills.

They will also serve as models for our own writing. Required Text: AMERICA NOW 12th ed., edited by Robert Atwan Recommended Text: A POCKET STYLE MANUAL 7th ed. by Diana Hacker. Credit/Evaluation: Credit will be awarded based regular, punctual attendance, meaningful contribution to discussions, completion of several essays, and completion of a formal research paper suitable for inclusion in your Fairhaven writing portfolio.

FAIR 202A Core: Humanities/Express Arts

Credits: 5

Instructor: Feodorov

Theme: Art and Society

Throughout history, Art has both adorned and justified the lifestyles of the rich and famous. From huge idealized statues of rulers to the frilly soft-porn paintings of 18th Century French Rococo, art has both pandered to and titillated the upper classes. However, it is a rash over-simplification to dismiss the entire history of Art as only catering to the tastes of the wealthy and powerful. In this combination seminar and studio class, we will investigate works by artists who have used their art to critique and resist power, voice their experiences and identities, promote and support social change, and envision alternative realities. Students will create 4 art projects based upon the themes discussed in class, keep a dedicated journal of at least 40 pages, and actively participate in class discussions of all required readings. Students will also give a presentation in class on an artist whose work fits within the theme of the course.

Credit/Evaluation: Regular and punctual attendance, active informed participation in class discussions, and timely completion of all assignments and projects are mandatory in order to receive credit. Art projects will be evaluated based upon: The ability to translate concepts into material form. The courage and willingness to take creative risks and problem solve. Attention to craft and process.

Text: none, but required readings will be available on Canvas.
 

FAIR 203A Social Relationshp/Responsibil

Credits: 5

Instructor: Calderon

Critical Indigenous Studies

This course explores key themes and ideas that have been developed within the area of study referenced as Critical Indigenous studies. Collectively, concepts of sovereignty, Indigenous self-determination, epistemology/ways of being, amongst others, are explored in relationship to the nation-state, citizenship, and empire. Some of the major contributions by Indigenous scholars we will cover include settler colonialism, survivance, Native feminisims, by scholars such as Vine Deloria, Gerald Vizenor, Sarah Deer, Paula Gunn Allen, Jodi Byrd, Eve Tuck, Glen Coulthard, and Margo Tamez. Through this course, students will engage with Indigenous informed thinking that will be useful to consider current issues related to the environment, activism, education, and other issues impacting Indigenous communities. Texts will included selected readings from Gerald Vizenor's Manifest manners: Postindian Warriors of Survivance, Eve Tuck and Wayne Yang's article, Decolonization is not a metaphor, Glen Coulthard, Red Skins, White Masks, Sarah Deer's The Beginning and the End of Rape: Confronting Sexual Violence in Native America, Margo Tamez's The Texas-Mexico border wall and Ndé memory" in the book Beyond Walls and Cages: Prisons, Borders, and Global Crisis (2012), and other selected chapters and articles.

Credit/Evaluation: Regular attendance, engaged/active participation in all class exercises, engagement in class discussion, strong evidence of reading, quality performance assignments throughout the quarter, quality of writing.

FAIR 203A Social Relationshp/Responsibil

Credits: 5

Instructor: Miyake

Through this course, students will examine both the history of the representation of race and whiteness in the United States and Western Europe and also the ways in which such representations have been shaped by cultural, political, historical, social, and economic forces and contexts in political and economic structures, academia, the mass media, and popular culture. Students will examine a wide range of works related to this increasingly established field of inquiry regarding these issues from the fields of anthropology, history, sociology, political science, and cultural studies. These readings and class discussions will emphasize the ways in which multiple discourses from each of these different fields of study have impacted each other and worked both in unison and tension to influence the ways in which the study and concepts of race and whiteness have been perceived and portrayed over the past several centuries.

Required Texts:
Hannaford, Ivan Race: The History of an Idea In the West. Washington, D.C.: Woodrow Wilson Center Press, 1996.
Painter, Nell Irvin. The History of White People. New York: W.W. Norton, 2010.
Coates, Ta-Nehisi. Between the World and Me. New York: Spiegel & Grau, 2015.

Texts for this course will also include other articles and book chapters as assigned by the instructor.

Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will take account of regular attendance, evidence of critical reading, engagement in class discussion and completion of assignments.

FAIR 203A Social Relationshp/Responsibil

Credits: 5

Instructor: O Murchu

Fair 201a/203a (Linked) Coming to America

Do you want to think about migration to America, free or forced and including colonial settlement, personally, creatively, and through research and social theory? Do you want to satisfy your critical and reflective inquiry (201a) and social relationships and responsibilities (203a) requirements in a block course with expert faculty and diverse peers? If so, please read on.

The phrase “Coming to America” often conjures up the image of tired, hungry and poor immigrants standing on a ship’s deck mesmerized by Lady Liberty while arriving at Ellis Island. Nowadays, a newcomer might arrive at John F. Kennedy Airport in New York City, be hidden deep in the bowels of a cargo ship inside a container originally built for boxes and dock along the seacoast, or ride a freight train to the country’s border and then walk. This course examines the historical and contemporary journeys and experiences of individuals, families, and social groups who “came” to this country. The word “came” is in quotation marks because not every arrival was desired or planned; in the 1700s, West Africans were kidnapped and forcibly shipped to these shores never to see their families or homelands again.

Does every newcomer experience a sense of bewilderment, loss, and confusion, and how do they eventually gather the spiritual and emotional energy to find their bearings and begin life again?  How have newcomers’ experiences varied, including perhaps your own families’?  What obstacles have they faced and opportunities have they created to survive and, ideally,  thrive in this land? 

To help you gain personal and historical understanding, do research and analyze various sources, we will (as a class) learn to critically read different “texts” (this includes written, aural, and visual), engage in deep discussions (“seminaring”), conduct research at the library, do oral interviews, and write papers on how your families came to this country.   Do you want to develop your personal (educational autobiography, migration story), research (annotated bibliography, question, documented paper), and expository (textual analysis) writing skills in one streamlined course?  

Social and political theory invites us to think about the meaning, criteria, benefits, and burdens of membership in modern societies? Was the United States more equal than European societies because it lacked an aristocracy and rigid class structures? Or is domination and subordination reproduced and inscribed in American society between settlers and natives, planters and slaves, “Whites” and people of color, men and women, Protestants  and Catholics or Christians and Muslims, straights and queers in other ways that are linked to our past and present (im)migrations?

Course Benefits: 1) Deep personal and intellectual relationships with your peers and professors; 2) integration of personal and political learning and personal and academic genres of writing and expression; 3) balanced load of reading, research, and writing assignments across the course of the quarter. Develop your personal (educational autobiography, migration story), research (annotated bibliography, question, documented paper), and expository (textual analysis) writing skills in one streamlined course.  

Possible Texts

David Gerber, American Immigration: A Very Short Introduction

Reyna Grande, The Distance Between Us

Hiroshi Motomura, Immigration Outside the Law (2014)

Harsha Walia, Undoing Border Imperialism (2013)

Credit/Evaluation: 1) Faithful Attendance – you may not miss more than two classes, except in exceptional circumstances, to receive credit; 2) engaged, spirited and civil participation; 3) an educational autobiography; 3) all of the steps of a multi-stage quarter long research project: i) a battery of research questions; ii) a list of sources; iii) a paper outline; iv) expositions of migration theorists’ ideas; v) an annotated bibliography; vi) a full paper draft; vii) a group presentation; viii) a final paper

How to register: Eligible students can get registration codes for both 201A and 203A from Anna Blick (Anna.Blick@wwu.edu) or Jackie McClure (Jackie.McClure@wwu.edu). Both sections must be taken together as class time will flow between both courses. Students must simultaneously register for the following CRNs after receiving override permission from Fairhaven College: 44034 and 44035

FAIR 206A Core:Science/Our Plc on Planet

Credits: 5

Instructor: Schwandt

Course Description: Exploring Malthus' premise through a lens two centuries later, students in this course will learn the primary factors influencing population growth: births, deaths, and migration, and apply this knowledge to understand global population dynamics. Topics will include the demographic transition, the youth demographic gift, population aging, rapid urbanization, and the effect of HIV/AIDS on population growth. Links between population, health, and the environment will be emphasized throughout the course, such as the effect of rapid population growth, especially urbanization, on environmental degradation, as well as the effects of environmental degradation on human survival.

Text: Laurie Mazur, A Pivotal Moment: Population, Justice and the Environmental Challenge (Washington DC: Island Press, 2010)

Requirements for Credit and Criteria for Evaluation: Students will be evaluated on their attendance, preparation for, via reading reflections, and participation in course discussions as well as one group research project, presentation, and paper (2,000 word minimum) on a group designed population, health, and/or environment research question of the group's choice. For the group research project we will link up with students in the Statistics class taught in the same quarter. The statistics students will serve as mentors to the 206A students in regards to the statistical aspects of the group research project.

FAIR 210A World Issues

Credits: 5

Instructor: Akinrinade

We are citizens of the world. As global citizens, what do we know and understand about global issues and ourselves in a world faced with complex issues, such as growing economic disparities, fragile democracies, environmental degradation, wars and militarism, civil liberties, racial profiling, and globalization? How do we become intelligently informed? What is our awareness of and participation in local and global efforts for positive social change?

This course explores the complex dynamics of our globalized world from a holistic, inter-disciplinary, and transnational perspective. Together we examine multiple world issues, such as global inequality and poverty, food security, human rights, water, energy, population growth, migration, cultural change, and public health, and our individual and community roles as agents of social change on local and global levels. This course is connected to the Wednesday World Issues Forum speaker series.

FAIR 210A World Issues

Credits: 5

Instructor: Schwandt

We are citizens of the world. As global citizens, what do we know and understand about global issues and ourselves in a world faced with complex issues, such as growing economic disparities, fragile democracies, environmental degradation, wars and militarism, civil liberties, racial profiling, and globalization? How do we become intelligently informed? What is our awareness of and participation in local and global efforts for positive social change?

This course explores the complex dynamics of our globalized world from a holistic, inter-disciplinary, and transnational perspective. Together we examine multiple world issues, such as global inequality and poverty, food security, human rights, water, energy, population growth, migration, cultural change, and public health, and our individual and community roles as agents of social change on local and global levels. This course is connected to the Wednesday World Issues Forum speaker series.

FAIR 218C The Hispano/A-American Exper

Credits: 4

Instructor: Estrada

Note: This class is cross-listed and meets with AMST 203. Students taking the Fairhaven section will be graded S/U and written self-evaluations will be required. This course will examine the socio-political, cultural and institutional structures directly impacting Chicano/a-Hispano-a populations within the United States and will provide an introduction to the historical and contemporary development of the Chicano/a community. An interdisciplinary approach will be taken as we focus on such topics as education, immigration, economic stratification as well as urbanization. Special emphasis will be given to the evolution of the roles of Xicanas as well as the development of social protest and social change within the barrio setting. Texts: FROM INDIANS TO CHICANOS: THE DYNAMICS OF MEXICAN AMERICAN CULTURE by Vigil; MASSACRE OF THE DREAMERS: ESSAYS ON XICANISMA by Castillo. Credit/Evaluation: The course will meet two times a week. Attendance is mandatory unless cleared by the instructor ahead of time or in the case of illness. The course will consist of lectures, discussions, videos and guest lecturers. The course is cross listed with AMST 203 and Fairhaven students will be evaluated in the Fairhaven manner rather than receiving a final grade for the course. Evaluation is based on participation in classroom discussions, two perspective papers, one midterm exam and a group term project paper and oral presentation.

FAIR 222G Imaginative Writing: Poetry

Credits: 4

Instructor: Tag

FAIR 222G: Imaginative Writing: Poetry Poetry is the language of being: the breath, the voice, the song, the speech of being. It does not need us. We are the ones in need of it.--Robert Bringhurst

Where does poetry come from? Where do we hear it, feel it, breathe it? How do we participate in its expression, its creation? What does it do to us? Emily Dickinson said, "If I read a book and it makes my whole body so cold no fire can warm me, I know that is poetry. If I feel physically as if the top of my head were taken off, I know that is poetry." Sherman Alexie said, "To see myself so fully understood in one line of a poem...written by someone else...was like understanding human language for the first time." What is necessary for us to engage in the writing, making, singing, and creating of poetry? Gary Snyder said he needs a sauna, a garden, a kitchen, and musical instruments. How about you? How might you dwell in the possibility of poetry? What body electrics do you have it in you to sing? What voices live inside you? Andrea Gibson said, "I am whatever I am when I am it." How might you grow outward into the world? Lucille Clifton discovered that the earth "is a black shambling bear / ruffling its wild back and tossing / mountains into the sea."

This course is an invitation to immerse yourself in the language of being: poetry. We will explore what it means to breathe, to live as creatures of rhythm, to delight in pattern, to illuminate images and moments, to sing, and to let words trip the light fantastic along our tongues. We will read ancient and contemporary poetry, listen to poetry, discuss poetry, cook poetry, eat poetry, make poetry, walk poetry, and discover poetry in strange and ordinary places in our lives. Be prepared to experiment, take risks, work hard, ask lots of questions, and write and write and write. Texts: To be announced.

Credit/Evaluation: Faithful attendance. Completion of weekly poems, writing exercises, a writing notebook, and several reflection essays. Active participation in class discussions, group work, class activities, and a final poetry reading. A completed portfolio of at least ten poems.

FAIR 223G Elements of Style

Credits: 1

Instructor: Tag

Fair 223G: Elements of Style What is a comma but a claw rending the sheet, the asthmatic's grasp? What is a question mark but what's needed to complete this thought? Punctuation: what is it, after all, but another way of cutting up time, creating or negating relationships, telling words when to take a rest, when to get on with their relentless stories, when to catch their breath?--Karen Elizabeth Gordon

If you care even the least whit about how you write, this is a class for you. We will certainly examine the rules and principles of English composition, including grammar, punctuation, word usage, sentence construction, and strategies for proofreading and revision. But such examinations are sometimes dull, stuffy, self-righteous, and boring. Ours will attempt a more stylish exploration of written style, like trying on hats in a haberdashery, or hounding the hobgoblins from our foolish consistencies, or swinging outward on a swaggering buccaneer's highest rope. Will it be dangerous? Of course! An education should be. So come all ye word-sick, word-loving, word-puzzled pilgrims. Bring your grammatical contusions and confusions. Your punctuated paralysis. Your fears of saying what you have to say, clearly and directly. Together we will try to unlock the mysteries of writing with style (or at least help decide when to use a dash-when parentheses). We will un-dangle our participles, un-awk our words. All are welcome to take this course. This will be a fun and challenging one-credit course, hopefully helping each of us get out of our one-horse towns, tilt at a few windmills, and learn what there is to learn in the wide, wide world of writing well.

Text: A DASH OF STYLE by Lukeman.

Credit/Evaluation: Faithful attendance. Active participation in all in-class writing exercises. Quality and completion of weekly writing exercises. Presentation of a special project.

FAIR 232P User-Friendly Statistics

Credits: 4

Instructor: Schwandt

Statistics are all around us every day--in the media, research, political decisions, and public debate. Statistics are used, and sometimes abused, in nearly every debate. At times we may be deceived by an improper use of statistics or by our own uncritical acceptance, and find ourselves believing or acting on a false claim. At other times, we may be so saturated with statistics or so cynical about their reliability that we just dismiss them. The objective of this class is to help develop a stronger critical understanding of statistics and statistical arguments, their strengths and weaknesses, uses and abuses, to diminish the chance of being deceived by them and to increase confidence in dealing with them. Through examples, exercises, case studies, and projects linked to real-world realms of interest such as social, environmental, and health issues, we will gain familiarity with terms, concepts, and techniques ranging from hypothesis testing to graphing. In this class we will link with the 206A: Population, Health, and the Environment course taught in the same quarter. Statistics students will be paired with 206A students to work on a group research project. The statistics students will serve as mentors to the 206A students in regards to the statistical aspects of the group research project.

FAIR 243U Embodied Mindfulness

Credits: 4

Instructor: Nichols

In this class, we will learn various practices of embodied mindfulness and sensory awareness, and ask whether and how they can influence the development of empathy, health and individual wellbeing.  We all face difficult experiences, a guaranteed part of being alive. In response, human beings have developed a range of methods to deal with crises and negative life events. Recent research--spanning disciplines as diverse as bio-behavioral medicine, the cognitive and affective neurosciences, physics and psychology--have investigated the potential benefits of practicing mindfulness, including stress reduction, alleviation of emotional suffering, and strengthening of the immune system. Mindfulness and body/mind intelligence increasingly are also being understood as important factors in the development of improved mental health.  Our methods will include an experiential approach, using practices from both disciplines of mindfulness and sensory awareness. We also will examine stress reduction from a personal approach.

“Mindfulness means maintaining a moment-by-moment awareness of our thoughts, feelings, bodily sensations, and surrounding environment.  Mindfulness also involves acceptance, meaning that we pay attention to our thoughts and feelings without judging them—without believing, for instance, that there’s a “right” or “wrong” way to think or feel in a given moment. When we practice mindfulness, our thoughts tune into what we’re sensing in the present moment rather than rehashing the past or imagining the future.”  --greatergood.berkeley.edu

“To stop your mind does not mean to stop the activities of the mind. It means your mind pervades your whole body." – Shunryu Suzuki, Zen Master
Text: The Miracle of Mindfulness by Thich Nhat Hanh;  Reclaiming Vitality and Presence: Sensory Awareness as a Practice for Life by Charlotte Selver, Tao Te Ching edited by Stephen Mitchell, and a range of published literature available through WWU via Canvas.

Credit/Evaluation: Demonstration of learning will include consistent and regular attendance, in-class participation, and fulfillment of reading assignments.  Answering reading questions for discussion and keeping a journal of personal observations regarding practices learned from the class.  Two papers of at least 5 pages each, and one in-depth final project presentation.

 

FAIR 245 Theory/Structure in Pop Music

Credits: 4

Instructor: Sehman

This course will examine the fundamentals of music theory, including reading and writing musical notation, scales, intervals, triads and chord progressions. We will then take the crucial next step of understanding the significance of those music theory techniques: How are they used in context to create meaningful, expressive music?

Focus will also be given to the larger social and cultural context the songs and artists we examine exist within. A song has many internal structures and meanings. But importantly, a song also interacts with the culture it exists within, and this is fundamental to our understanding of that music.

We will analyze songs in different styles and genres, chosen by both the instructor and students. The sheet music for these songs will be used as a means for analysis, to better understand the music theory and songwriting techniques used. Through written responses and discussion of songs, students will also be encouraged to refine their ability to clearly and effectively communicate their ideas about music.

The goal of this course is to enrich our understanding of the music we interact with, whether it be as listeners, performers or songwriters. No experience with music theory or reading music notation is required

Text Principles of Music, by Philip Lambert (Oxford University Press)

Requirements/Evaluation Students will be expected to complete all reading and listening assignments, and participate in class discussion that arise from these. There are will also be weekly music theory assignments. Students will analyze and present at least one song to the class during the quarter. Evaluation will be based on successful completion of material and active involvement

FAIR 246 Mariachi Music/Perform&Culture

Credits: 3

Instructor: Miyake

Ever since its establishment as a centerpiece of Mexican popular culture in the first half of the 20th century, Mariachi music has acted both as a central expression of Mexican identity and also as one of the most widely recognized representations of Mexican people and culture for those outside of this community. Students in this class will explore this cultural and artistic movement through both academic engagement and hands-on experience in creating this music themselves. Class meetings will include sessions in which we will discuss academic and popular texts on Mariachi music and culture as well as participating in discussions with guest speakers and performers, and sessions in which class members will learn to perform Mariachi music in both individual and ensemble formats. No experience in performing Mariachi music is required for this class- all instruction and expected musical collaborations will be designed to fit the experience level of each individual student. This course is repeatable for up to a total of twelve (12) credits. Required Texts: Wade, Bonnie C. Thinking Musically: Experiencing Music, Expressing Culture. 3rd ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 2013. Sheehy, Daniel Edward. Mariachi Music in America: Experiencing Music, Expressing Culture. New York: Oxford University Press, 2006.

Texts for this course will also include other articles, book chapters, and music as assigned by the instructor.

NB: Alternate readings will be provided for students who have already received credit for this course in an earlier quarter Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will take account of regular attendance, evidence of critical reading, engagement in class discussion and completion of assignments.

FAIR 254X Intro to Relief Printing

Credits: 4

Instructor: S'eiltin

In this studio art class we will explore various skills and techniques in relief printing. A relief print is created by carving into a surface that yields an image by inking only the raised areas. This technique can be applied to a wide variety of surfaces, which are considered plates. We will begin by carving into linoleum blocks, and later work with wood and plexiglas. Of all the forms of expression in printmaking, the relief print is the most ancient. In the process of creating relief prints we will also explore some of printmaking's rich history.


The primary focus of this class will be relief printing and its history, but we will also create and combine experimental printing techniques. Monotypes and collographs are some of the alternative printing methods that will incorporated with relief techniques. Also emphasized in this class will be the importance of content and visual narratives. Students will be encouraged to create images based on a theme of their choice. Personal themes will be developed throughout the quarter with feedback form classmates and instructor. The goal is to create images that successfully reflect a particular subject matter.


Text: THE COMPLETE PRINTMAKER by Romano.


Credit/Evaluation: Final prints will be critiqued twice a week. Final evaluation is based on the student's ability to break creative boundaries and to produce technically skilled prints that successfully reflect the development and refinement of a specific subject matter or theme.

FAIR 255Y Folk Music Experience

Credits: 2

Instructor: Bower

This course combines playing folk music with the study of the contexts in which folk music has evolved. For this quarter, we will study music from the tradition of Rhythm and Blues, including both historical artists, to artists who arose during the 1950's to lay the groundwork for rock and roll, to the current R&B scene. Students will be expected to participate in discussions on readings assigned during the first five weeks of the course. Each student will be asked to introduce one song to the class that is relevant to the Rhythm and Blues genre and enriches our knowledge of folk music or the context within which folk music has been written and performed. Students will write a short research paper that forms the basis for their presentation on the song and its context. Students will also be responsible for learning and practicing the songs that are presented to the class, including practice in small groups. Students are encouraged to gain practice at playing one or more folk music instruments during the course, and are invited to join the course even if they are beginners at playing an instrument or if they prefer to just sing.

Texts: Texts will change from quarter to quarter. For this course, texts have yet to be determined. Credit/Evaluation: Regular attendance and participation in our weekly sing, informed participation in class discussions, one short research paper and song presentation, and practicing music in a small group.

FAIR 263B American Indian Experience

Credits: 4

Instructor: Rowe

Note: This class is cross-listed and meets with AMST 202. This course introduces the study of American Indians. It discusses the indigenous people of North America with a focus on those within the settler state boundaries of the United States. Lectures and readings address Indian histories before and since the various European invasions but will primarily deal with the history of Indians' relations with the United States. Course materials touch on current issues such as health, the environment, education and economic development. The course employs readings, lectures, discussion, films and experiential learning to meet its goal. Students will write short response papers, an essay on the assigned novel, and midterm and final exams. Texts: Required: Bruce E. Johansen, The Native Peoples of North America. James Welch, Fools Crow.

Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation for purposes of granting credit will be based on regular attendance, meaningful participation in discussions, completion of assignments, completion of midterm and final exams, and quality of writing.

FAIR 270B Intro to Digital Video Prod

Credits: 2

Instructor: Miller

This class will introduce basic camera use and video editing in the digital medium. Students will script, shoot, and edit 5 assignments using Final Cut Pro X. Projects range from a 30-second commercial to a 3-5 minute final video on the student's choice of topic. The assignments are set up to encourage individual creativity & personal editing styles. Texts: Class Readings Credit/Evaluation: Completion of assignments, participation in class, attendance, and understanding gained from the class assignments.

FAIR 270H Intro to Audio Recording

Credits: 4

Introduction to Audio explores the techniques, tools, and technology used in multi-track recording. From a beginner's perspective, this course follows the recording process starting with the tracking session, then the overdub session, and through the mix-down session. By examining the various pieces of the recording process students will learn the concepts and skills necessary to use studio equipment such as microphones (their characteristics and placement), mixing consoles (explained in detail), multi-track recorders (analog and digital), patch bays, signal and effect processors, headphone systems, and multi-track punching and bouncing. Each student is also expected to attend a weekly two-hour small group lab, held in the studio, giving the student a chance to experience multi-track recording in a hands-on manner. A detailed manual will be provided to each student so that each concept will be encountered first in an assigned reading, then in lab, and finally in the class meetings.

Texts: THE RECORDING ENGINEER'S HANDBOOK (3rd edition) by Owsinski and the Fairhaven Recording Studio Lab Manual. The lab manual text will be provided by the instructor and paid for with lab fees.

Credit/Evaluation: Students will be evaluated through a combination of participation, attendance (lab and lecture), research projects, and understanding gained from the material evaluated from a hands-on assessment. Additionally, students will be required to complete a creative project with the instructor in the studio as a final project.

FAIR 303A Core:Intrdisc Cncntrtn Sem

Credits: 5

Instructor: Pierce

What questions do you want to explore in your Interdisciplinary Concentration? (Are you asking questions, for example, about inequalities, ecology, musical cultures, or performance?) Why are these questions important enough intellectually, politically, socially or professionally to form the basis for your Interdisciplinary Concentration? Your challenge in the Concentration Seminar is a two- or three-fold one. First, you must answer the question of why your concentration matters to your own satisfaction. Second, you want to communicate the reasons why your concentration's questions matter to the mythical "average reader" in your rationale. Third, you must identify the set of courses, independent study projects, internships, or other forms of experiential learning that allow you to explore your underlying questions about your subject in the rest of your time at Fairhaven College. In practical terms, the seminar is designed to assist you with your development and writing of an interdisciplinary concentration. It will serve as a forum for discussion, guidance, and support during the proposal writing process. You will work collaboratively with your seminar, your instructor, and your concentration committee, to write your learning proposal and identify relevant courses and experiences to help you achieve your educational goals. Here are some of the practical questions this seminar will help to address: - What are the appropriate guidelines and requirements involved? - What exactly is it you want to achieve in your degree? - How can your intentions be given effective shape and form? - Who should be on your committee? - How do the parts of your concentration work together conceptually? - What are the best vehicles for your learning? - What should you put in and what should you leave out of your concentration? Text: Handbook on Canvas + Occasional Readings distributed in class Credit/Evaluation: Faithful preparation for and attendance at seminar; Steady work on your proposal; Contributions to the development of your group members' proposals. Credit for the course is granted when your completed committee-approved proposal has been filed with the Fairhaven Records Office and a regular self-evaluation form is submitted to the instructor.

FAIR 305A Writing & Transition Conferenc

Credits: 3

Instructor: Schwandt

The Writing Portfolio and Transition Conference are Core graduation requirements for all Fairhaven College students. Your Writing Portfolio will be a selective collection of your academic writing and an introductory statement of self-assessment about your writing at this point in your education. It will be reviewed and assessed by your Fairhaven faculty advisor. Your Transition Conference is a constructive mid-point conversation with advising resource people you invite to share your educational plans and collect advice officially moving you from the "Exploratory" stage of Fairhaven's program into the "Concentrated" stage of your educational plans, regardless of your choice of major. You should embark on these requirements when you and your faculty advisor agree you're ready for them. This is not a class, however you must attend one orientation meeting early in the quarter. Details about the orientation meeting schedule will be sent to all enrolled students via email and posted on the FAIR 305a class CANVAS site.

In order to receive credit for FAIR305a you must: 1) Submit your Writing Portfolio prepared according to specifications to be provided at our orientation and on our class Canvas site. 2) Schedule and conduct a Transition Conference which includes writing and circulating a Transition Conference Statement to your invited participants prior to the conference. Additional details and instructions will be provided at our orientation and on our class Canvas site.

FAIR 311B The American Legal System

Credits: 5

Instructor: Lopez

Reproductive Rights

An in-depth look at the American legal system and how it affects individuals and society, with coverage of legal vocabulary, sources of law, the structure of the government, the Supreme Court and the judicial system. The structure and evolving nature of the legal system, legal reasoning and the role of courts in government. Case analysis skills will be stressed, including identifying the issue, procedural history, facts, reasoning and holding of each case.
This class is required for the Law, Diversity and Justice concentration and minor. It should serve as a foundational course for anyone interested in learning about American law.

Learning Objectives:
Examination of the role and importance of the judicial system in government, including federal, state and tribal legal systems, with an emphasis on the U.S. Supreme Court
Critical thinking skills stressed, including an analysis of how systemic inequalities may be replicated by the existing legal systems Introduction to common law and the doctrine of stare decisis by following a line of precedent on a specific theme
Introduction to writing case briefs with an ability to identify procedural history, issue(s), analysis, holding(s) and dicta Introduction to civil law and criminal law
Basic legal vocabulary
Introduction to legal database Lexis/Nexus
Public presentation skills


Texts: Class Manual of case readings prepared by Instructor; Barron’s Law Dictionary


Credit and Evaluation: No more than THREE absences will be allowed if you want credit for this class. Active and informed class participation will be expected. Assignments will include oral presentations on Supreme Court Justices, weekly case briefs and worksheets, an 8-10 page research paper.

 

FAIR 323G Imaginative Writing II

Credits: 4

Instructor: Friedland

Heart/Source/Core Identity all those things are fictions, I'd argue. The edges are what matters, becoming is what is important. The heart's empty but the blood's a presence. It's in motion; it's always out there making its rounds. -C.S. Giscombe

This course will focus on generative writing practices that ask us to move towards the edge of our own knowing, and which are, at core, relational. We will explore how divergent voices, experiences, and perspectives can meet and be brought into conversation with each other. Through an evolving set of practices such as dream recording, mapping, walks, collaborative writing, and documentary writing we can begin to discover what lies beyond our tendencies and resistances on the "other side." Each week we will create rites of boundary, crossing, errantry or return, as we consider writing as interplay between a limit and its potential for opening and passage. As part of this consideration, theoretical concepts from cultural cartography and border poetics will allow us to build an interdisciplinary vocabulary and further instruct our discussions on the poetics of encounter. While the emphasis will be to generate new work in poetry and prose, our weekly in-class sessions will also incorporate work by writers and artists, such as C.D. Wright, Sara Uribe, Pauline Oliveros, Abdellah Taïa, W.G. Sebald, and Cecilia Vicuña for further inquiry and conversation. Credit/Evaluation: - A portfolio of four revised pieces that you generated with a brief preface reflecting on process, methodology and trajectory of the work. - Regular attendance, active participation, peer feedback. - Completion of readings before class sessions. Readings:

Most readings will be available on Canvas or as a printed copy.

FAIR 334C International Human Rights

Credits: 5

Instructor: Akinrinade

This course examines the idea of human rights, its historical, philosophical and legal origins. It explores the notion of universal rights and examines the relativity debate. It will introduce students to rights that are guaranteed and selective substantive rights will be examined - civil and political rights; economic, social and cultural rights, and other classes of rights. Other considerations include national, regional and international institutions created to supervise implementation of and compliance with those rights. It will also consider the role of non-governmental organizations and activists who seek to enforce human rights.

TEXTBOOK ON INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS, by Smith, Rhona K. M.; INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS, by Alston, Philip & Goodman, Ryan

Evaluation will take account of regular attendance, evidence of critical reading, engagement in class discussion, the quality of short reactions, and two assignments.THERE WILL BE NO COURSE CREDIT FOR ANYONE WHO MISSES THREE (3) CLASSES IN THE QUARTER.

FAIR 334N Topics Evolutionary Biology

Credits: 5

Instructor: Bower

This course will explore evolutionary theory and evolutionary history, with particular focus on this question: Can the study of evolutionary biology and our human evolutionary history teach us anything important about ourselves that can be useful in today's world? To do this, we will consider how human evolution may have influenced our modern behavior - our eating habits, personalities, sexuality, spirituality, and how we relate to family, friends, and foes? For instance, could our evolutionary past influence our choice of romantic partners (short term or long term) and how we relate to them over the short or long haul? And, can evolutionary biology inform us about how conflict and cooperation occur in modern human relationships and societies? And, what role has evolution played in shaping current human mental health?

Other questions we will entertain include: What happens when scientists debate these issues in private and public? What happens when evolutionary theory leaves the halls of science and interacts with cultural forces? How have evolutionary views been used to justify oppression? Finally, we will consider whether the recent resurgence of evolutionary views of human behavior are likely to play a repeat role in oppressive politics or whether it might even help us construct a more just society.

To study these questions, we will rely on readings and on a groundbreaking video series that explores evolution, the history of evolutionary thought, as well as an animal behavior field study.

Texts: Alison Jolly: LUCY'S LEGACY: SEX AND INTELLIGENCE IN HUMAN EVOLUTION; Carl Zimmer: THE TANGLED BANK: AN INTRODUCTION TO EVOLUTION; and additional selected readings.

Requirements for credits and criteria for evaluation: Regular attendance in class, informed participation in class discussions, weekly written reactions to class readings and weekly responses to other students' writing, several short writing assignments, and an end of quarter 6-8 page paper that develops a position about issues relevant to the class.

FAIR 334P Ecological Restoration

Credits: 3

Instructor: Tuxill

Long-term solutions to contemporary environmental problems involve not just conservation of the natural world, but increasingly the restoration of ecologically healthy landscapes and communities. This course introduces students to the science and practice of restoring ecological systems. In lecture and discussion, we will examine the implications of ecological theory for understanding how natural landscapes change under the impacts of human activities. We also will review case studies where shifts in natural resource use and environmental policies have helped restore the ecological health of forests, rivers, grasslands, and other ecosystems. Students will gain practical skills by working in groups to plan and implement ecological restoration projects at a local field site. As part of the interdisciplinary focus of this course, we also will connect our scientific understanding to social meanings of ecological restoration as experienced by individuals, communities, and cultures.

Texts: Reading assignments will be drawn from scientific journals and other primary texts, and distributed via Canvas.

Credit/evaluation: Regular attendance and informed contribution to discussions is essential. Evaluation will be based on each student's grasp and understanding of the issues presented in the readings. Students also will: 1) work in teams to research, plan, and implement an ecological restoration project locally; 2) prepare a written project proposal and oral presentation; and 3) complete at least 2 hours of service learning with a local or regional conservation organization involved in ecological restoration, documented with a brief written report.

FAIR 335C Multicultural Psychology

Credits: 5

Faculty: Kevin Delucio

Multicultural Psychology is a field that seeks to understand how variability among different cultural groups can offer insight into viable models of everyday experiences, while addressing how one's unique intersection of identities invariably constrain or privilege one's experiences. We will explore how multicultural psychology is viewed as a fourth "force" in the field and how this impacts both research and applied aspects of psychology. Historically, multicultural psychology has had a primary focus on racial identity within the U.S. context. However, there is increasing recognition of the need to understand how social identities exist in relation to one another; as such, we will examine the intersections between race, gender, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, ability, and other social/marginalized group memberships. Through readings, discussions, activities, and films, we will be examining questions such as the following: What is multiculturalism and what does it take to define something as "multicultural"? How does someone's intention factor in when considering the impact of race-related comments? What are possible impacts of stereotypes on academics, employment, and parenting? In addition, we will explore differences in worldviews (e.g., individualism v. collectivism), means of communication, cultural identity development, acculturation, ways to build multicultural competence, and critiques of the field. Emphasis will be placed on empirical research and psychological theory, aimed at helping you develop competence and knowledge when discussing many real-word examples and events. Texts Required: Mio, J., Barker, L., & Domenech-Rodriguez, M. (Eds.). (2015). Multicultural psychology: Understanding our diverse communities (4th ed.). Oxford University Press. Recommended: American Psychological Association. (2010). Publication manual of the american psychological association (6th ed.). Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association.

Additional readings will be uploaded to Canvas

Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will include regular attendance and active and thoughtful participation, evidence of critical reading, quality of reading reactions, short presentations, and a final project.

FAIR 336B Neoliberalism Public School

Credits: 4

Instructor: Pierce

Neoliberalism and the Public School
 
Neoliberalism is an economic and social model of governance rooted in the idea that society is best organized under the rule of radical free markets. This course examines and charts the rise of neoliberal driven school reform in the U.S. Special focus will be given to how free market school reform models treat ongoing racial and economic injustice in the U.S. Case study examples of New Orleans, Chicago, and Washington DC will be used to analyze the results of corporate education governance. Both a theoretical and historical approach will be taken to evaluate the claims made by neoliberal education reform proponents for achieving racial and economic equity through public education. Students will also be asked to analyze and present reflection projects on the recent Washington State Charter School Initiative (Proposition 1240) as well as community responses such as the “opt out” movement.
 
Learning Outcomes: Define and understand the principal assumptions of neoliberal economic and social policy; Identify consequences of neoliberal education reform policies in major U.S. cities; Evaluate the claims of equity and justice made by proponents of neoliberal education reformers; Apply course knowledge to construct arguments for what a racially and economic just public education system should include
 
Credit and Evaluation: Participation in class discussion and regular attendance; Timely and thoughtful completion of course readings and writing assignments; quality of writing assignments that use evidence from course readings; quality of reflection projects; critical and respectful engagement in class

Required Texts: 1.) Naomi Kline, The Shock Doctrine. 2.) Kenneth Saltman, The Failure of Corporate School Reform. 3.) Pauline Lipman, The New Political Economy of Urban Education: Neoliberalism, Race, and the Right of the City

 

FAIR 336B Peace Corps Experience

Credits: 4

Instructor: Helling

Begun in 1961, the Peace Corps is widely hailed as a successful program. Joseph H. Blatchford, Peace Corps Director, 1969-1971, claimed: The Peace Corps is respected in this country because Volunteers have sacrificed comfort and consumption to do a job in the developing world; because this country respects adventure, voluntary spirit, and the desire to help others. The Peace Corps is respected abroad because volunteers have often done the different jobs no one else was able or willing to do; because Volunteers have filled needs for trained manpower at critical times. Moreover, the Peace Corps comes without strings or ulterior motive, separate from American foreign policy, with no other purpose than to help where needed. Throughout this course we will examine and test the assumptions in Blatchford's statement. What does it mean to go into another country and culture to "help?" Is it possible for the thousands of Peace Corps Volunteers (PCV) to go to another place without "ulterior motive?"

Are Volunteers "guests" or "helpers" and what is the difference? What is one's duty to society and to oneself, and how does one navigate conflicting values of race, gender, sexual orientation, religion and poverty in light of this duty? There is now a wealth of literature written by RPCVs (Returned Peace Corps Volunteers) about their Peace Corps experiences. We will also look at the Peace Corps through the eyes of the citizens of the host countries.

Also, the instructor served as a PCV in Niger, West Africa, 1988-1990. Texts: George Packer, The Village of Waiting (focus on a PCV experience in Togo); more to be determined. Credit/Evaluation: regular attendance (no more than three absences), active and respectful participation in class discussion, short paper based on an interview with a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer (I can help you find one), reflective journals, and a 6-8 page research paper related to the Peace Corps with an oral presentation on the research topic.

FAIR 336B Analysis of the Individual

Credits: 4

Faculty: Breyan Haizlip

How does one become who they are? What makes the I"? The purpose of this seminar is to investigate the influences of individual culture on the development of personality, cognition, and behavior over the lifespan. While culture is dynamic and multidimensional, through a developmental psychology paradigm, this course will examine the evolution of one's gender, sexual, racial/ethnic, and spiritual/religious identity development. Course topics will cover:White/Black/Latino/Asian Racial Identity Development, Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual/Heterosexual Identity Development, Transgender Theories, and Spiritual/Religious Identity Development. This seminar course will rely on growth groups, interpersonal reflection activities, multimedia observation, academic debates, and consciousness raising groups. The capstone project for this course is a service learning project. Students should expect deeply self-evaluative and reflective activities as the hallmark of every aspect of this course, as the primary goal of this course is personal growth. Credit/Evaluation:

Evaluation will take account of regular attendance (no more than three absences), as this course relies centrally on in-class growth group participation. Students will also be assessed on evidence of critical reading, active, respectful, and thought-provoking engagement in class discussion, weekly reflective journals that include personal observations regarding insights learned from the course, one in-depth 6-8 page Personal Development Paper, one Cultural Immersion Service Learning Project, and one final project presentation. There will be no course credit for anyone who misses more than three classes in the quarter.

Essential Readings: A Class Manual of weekly articles will be prepared by the Instructor Dr. Breyan Haizlip.

FAIR 336M Music Intl Social Change

Credits: 4

Instructor: Coulet du Gard

The course explores the significance of music in various social change movements affecting human rights outside the US. Areas of focus include issues of music as manifesto; gender equality in Russia; class and ethnicity rights; the Arab Spring Movement; the Estonian Singing Revolution, and Bob Marley. Materials will be linked to the study of ethnomusicology. One class trip (required) will help in understanding the content of history in music.

Students will be required to complete readings, participate in discussions with group activities, write two essays, lead one discussion, and submit a final paper or present a project in class. Attendance and participation are at the core of this course, with only 3 allowed missed classes. Required text: Pussy Riot: A Punk Prayer (2012) The Feminist Press at CUNY available at WWU AS Bookstore or via online resources. Bob Marley: A Life (2008) by Gary Steckles, Interlink Books. Additional Course Materials: Canvas Modules will include documents, and various links to music videos and articles.

FAIR 336M Field Recording Digital Radio

Credits: 4

Instructor: Miyake

From pirate radio to commercial mass media operations, the airwaves have always been a way for individuals to communicate their ideas to the community. The current wide dissemination of digital radio formats can and does play a central role in the self-identity, external identity, and informed nature of large and small communities focused on a wide range of social and political issues. In this course, students will learn foundational technical aspects that are involved with field recording and editing as well as aspects specific to the production of audio programs and individual shows/podcasts. We will also learn about the current rules, regulations, and policies for internet broadcasting, and consider the impact of radio on a range of social and political issues from its past and onwards to the future. Required Texts: Hilmes, M., & Loviglio, J. (2002). Radio Reader: Essays in the Cultural History of Radio. New York: Routledge. Kern, J. (2008). Sound Reporting: The NPR Guide to Audio Journalism and Production. Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press. Squier, Susan Merrill. (2003). Communities of the Air: Radio Century, Radio Culture. Durham, NC: Duke University Press. Texts for this course will also include other articles and book chapters as assigned by the instructor.

Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will take account of regular attendance, evidence of critical reading, engagement in class discussion, three brief audio assignments, two written assignments, and one final project.

FAIR 336V Art Dream Memory

Credits: 4

Instructor: Feodorov

This studio art course focuses on using memory and dream imagery as the basis for creating art. Students can utilize their experience and skills through a variety of media such as drawing, painting, installation, photography and/or video. Students are encouraged to draw upon their own personal memories, as well as those involving family and community, with the goal of imbuing their art with a deeper sense of meaning for both themselves and their audience. In addition, the class will explore various theories regarding art and the subconscious, art movements such as Symbolism, Surrealism and German Expressionism, as well as some more contemporary examples. Additionally, we will learn how several of these theories and movements were based upon policies of colonialism, oppression and cultural appropriation. Students will be responsible for completing five art projects, with written artist statements for each project. Students are expected to work both within and outside of class on their projects. A required 40-page journal of notes, ideas, sketches, etc, will be turned in at the end of the quarter. Occasional required readings will be handed out and discussed as a class.

Credit/Evaluation: Credit is based upon REGULAR PUNCTUAL attendance, timely completion of all art projects, journals and reading assignments. Regular informed participation in class discussions and the willingness to take creative and conceptual risks are essential.

Text: none, but required readings will be available on Canvas.

FAIR 343U Survey Somatic Psych

Credits: 4

Instructor: Nichols

Students interested in the emerging field of mind-body topics will benefit from this in-depth survey of Somatic Psychology. Through the assigned text and other interdisciplinary literature, lectures, discussion, and experiential inquiry, we will examine the emergence of a transdisciplinary inquiry into the nature and debatable unity of the body, the mind, the environment, and the resulting self-organizing felt sense experience.  Over the past two decades this inquiry has matured into the field of Somatic Psychology, which seeks to advance philosophical arguments and empirical evidence to support, refine, and clarify the basic assumptions of a somatic life.  Parallel to this intellectual mission is developing practical applications in the clinical psychotherapeutic domain. This course will map the historical emergence of Somatic Psychology and track the core questions and assumptions that define the field. We will examine a variety of body-centered psychotherapies and movement practices, and critically assess current and future challenges of the field, centering on some of the deepest and most passionate questions of academic inquiry. Are the mind and body separate? How do the mind and body relate? What is healing? What is energy? What is the placebo effect, and what does it say about the mind and body relationship? How does the gut participate in reason? How is our experience as embodied beings sculpted by culture?  This course will embrace thinking through multiple lines of reasoning and the experiential exploration of Somatic Psychology.

Text: THE EMERGENCE OF SOMATIC PSYCHOLOGY AND BODYMIND THERAPY, Barnaby B. Barratt (2010, Palgrave Macmillan).

Credit/Evaluation:  (1) Regular and timely attendance; (2) consistent participation; (3) one midterm visual map showing comprehension of the development of the field; (4) one 6-8 page integration paper, and (5) one final group project/ presentation on a specific branch of Somatic Psychology.

FAIR 345A Prin of Soc Entrepreneurship

Credits: 4

Instructor: Coulet du Gard

This course will cover the principles and practices of social entrepreneurship. The emphasis is on understanding systems changes to improve the lives of people and the planet in the face of current local and global problems. The course will analyze current efforts to address and solve these problems by social entrepreneurs. We will take a careful look at intentional communities organizing, coordinating, and cooperating within a number of different models. These models, found throughout the world, exhibit modalities ranging from the acceptable nonprofit (non governmental) model to cooperatives, non-monetary systems of barter, to systems reducing their budgets on annual basis (the opposite of the monetary growth model.) Through readings, discussions, films, and guest lecturers, students will gain an understanding of social entrepreneurs at work.

Social entrepreneurs are change agents who improve systems by creating and implementing new, positive solutions in communities experiencing societal and environmental problems. This course is interdisciplinary and practical. It requires interactive discussion, careful reading of materials, and the desire on the student's part to make a difference in this world. Students enrolling in this course, at least for this quarter, will be considered "change makers." Essays, discussions, and the final project will all revolve around "creating good work."

Credit/Evaluation: Students will be expected to write 4 essays of 500 words each; participate in class discussions of assigned readings; lead one discussion during the quarter in tandem with another student; complete a final project, presentation or paper relating to social entrepreneurship; and attend classes regularly (no more than 3 missed classes will be allowed.) Service Learning is an option for the final project.

Texts and Materials: 1.Rodriguez-Heyman, Darian, ed. Nonprofit Management 101 2011 (available free through WWU library online) 2.Wiley, Margaret and Deborah Frieze Walk Out Walk On 2011. 4.Canvas online documents and links. Recommended: Bornstein, David and Susan Davis Social Entrepreneurship: What Everyone Needs to Know 2010 (available free through WWU library online; and paperback available in Bookstore.)

FAIR 370I Introduction to Pro Tools

Credits: 4

FAIR 370J Studio Recording

Credits: 4

Instructor: Fish

Studio Recording takes the concepts introduced in Intro to Audio and Intro to Pro Tools and allows the student to apply and practice them in a hands-on manner, with the goal of becoming familiar with and competent in the use of the equipment in the Champion Street Studio (located in downtown Bellingham). Students will complete at least four multi-track recording projects and will have the opportunity to work on other recording sessions as well. Through the students' work on these projects they will learn efficiency and speed in the techniques of tracking, overdubbing, and mixdown sessions. The recording projects will be evaluated by the instructor as well as the other students in the class. This course will also involve development of critical listening skills as well as the creative and imaginative expression possible in audio recording. Students will keep a detailed journal of their session work. This is a Pro Tools based course and enrolled students will gain access to the Fairhaven Studio, Mixing Suite, and Champion St Studios.

Texts: The Recording Engineer's handbook (3rd edition) by Owsinski

Credit/Evaluation: Each student must finish the assigned projects which will be critiqued by the instructor and peers based on sound quality, balance, clarity and realization. Overall evaluation will be made based on effort, participation and growth as an engineer.

FAIR 370K Advanced Studio Recording

Credits: 4

Instructor: Fish

This class will give students with advanced recording experience the opportunity to record and mix on an industry standard Pro Tools 12 HD system. Students will enhance their knowledge of Pro Tools and learn how to use this software in conjunction with a large-format analog mixing console. Topics such as drum sample replacement, audio quantization, convolution impulse responses, spectrum analysis, DSP processing and other advanced topics will be covered. Students will be expected to conduct at least three recording/mixing sessions throughout the quarter and prepare a final portfolio for in-class critique. Students will also learn how to properly configure Pro Tools HD hardware and software components, how to setup session templates and how to utilize each component of an HD/analog system. Enrolled students will gain access to the Fairhaven Studio, Mixing Suite, and Champion St Studios.

Texts: Reprinted materials.

Credit/Evaluation: Projects will be evaluated throughout the quarter by the instructor and the other members of the class.

FAIR 380A Music Production Using Reason

Credits: 4

Instructor: Sehman

This course will focus on creating music using the software, Reason. We will learn the essential operations of that program, with the goal of empowering students to create music of any style and form- from pop songs, to beat making, to ambient music, or spoken word pieces. By the end of this course students will have a portfolio of 3-4 compositions.

This course will also focus on the creative process and how it relates to music production. As a group we will explore common practices, workflow and roadblocks in the creative process, with the goal of strengthening each class member's individual creative voice.

Topics will include: *Using modular synths: Learning the essentials of oscillators, filters, LFOs, and ADSR envelopes in order to create a personal sound. *Using pre-composed loops as an empowering tool to supplement your compositional technique and language. *Incorporating samples into your music: to expand or comment on the work of other artists, or to incorporate the voices of important figures (e.g. the speeches of Martin Luther King, Jr.; the lectures of Noam Chomsky) *The fundamentals of beat making: examining drum machines, step sequencers, and the basic kick/snare/high hat texture of many drum beats. *Song orchestration: the functional and timbral layers of a song, and how they work together. *Song structure: how music is constructed in a linear way to create a meaningful narrative and flow.

Requirements/Evaluation Students will be expected to actively pursue musical creation in this class. Evaluation will be based on the student's active involvement with their own work and the class, rather than the style or skill level of their musical creations.

*Please note: No experience is necessary with music composition, music production or the software, Reason. This course intends to engage students at whatever experience level they enter.

FAIR 403A Advanced Seminar

Credits: 4

Instructor: Akinrinade

ANNE TREAT, Spring 2007 grad, said: "There is no possible way I can give justice to the complexity of experiences, triumphs, pitfalls and challenges of my academic career in the course of this paper. This artifact of self-reflection is simply a pause in the broader conversation of my academic journey, an invitation for me to mindfully articulate the ways those things I've studied, read, discussed and experienced over the past four years have informed and challenged my personal development, and how I've chosen to integrate and express that knowledge through the actions of my life" This seminar is a wonderful opportunity to reflect on what you have been up to all these years of being educated--through writing, conversation, presentations, and listening to each other. You will read and discuss a book and other readings, co-facilitating at least one discussion; write and share a variety of short writing assignments, designed to help you complete your Summary and Evaluation, and provide a supportive community in which to summarize and critically reflect upon your Fairhaven (or Life) education. Each student will also present or teach something to the class from the heart of his or her educational experience. This course is one of our favorites to teach at Fairhaven because we learn so much about our students, and the many intriguing, complex, deep, creative and quirky ways there are to be human and to become educated. The class also illustrates the value of writing as a process of discovery, synthesis and meaning. We will all do our best to help you express most clearly what your education has been about, and are honored to learn from your stories, your minds, your creativity, and your lives. The course will be as significant as you make it. Be honest. It is your life, your education, so let us understand what it has meant and what it really means to you now.

FAIR 403A Advanced Seminar

Credits: 4

Instructor: Rowe

ANNE TREAT, Spring 2007 grad, said: "There is no possible way I can give justice to the complexity of experiences, triumphs, pitfalls and challenges of my academic career in the course of this paper. This artifact of self-reflection is simply a pause in the broader conversation of my academic journey, an invitation for me to mindfully articulate the ways those things I've studied, read, discussed and experienced over the past four years have informed and challenged my personal development, and how I've chosen to integrate and express that knowledge through the actions of my life" This seminar is a wonderful opportunity to reflect on what you have been up to all these years of being educated--through writing, conversation, presentations, and listening to each other. You will read and discuss a book and other readings, co-facilitating at least one discussion; write and share a variety of short writing assignments, designed to help you complete your Summary and Evaluation, and provide a supportive community in which to summarize and critically reflect upon your Fairhaven (or Life) education. Each student will also present or teach something to the class from the heart of his or her educational experience. This course is one of our favorites to teach at Fairhaven because we learn so much about our students, and the many intriguing, complex, deep, creative and quirky ways there are to be human and to become educated. The class also illustrates the value of writing as a process of discovery, synthesis and meaning. We will all do our best to help you express most clearly what your education has been about, and are honored to learn from your stories, your minds, your creativity, and your lives. The course will be as significant as you make it. Be honest. It is your life, your education, so let us understand what it has meant and what it really means to you now.

FAIR 412E Japanese American Internment and Today

Credits: 4

Instructor: Helling

Initially, we will focus on the Korematsu case, the 1944 case where the U.S. Supreme Court found the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II to be constitutional.

Fred Korematsu was convicted of a misdemeanor for remaining in San Leandro, California, a "Military Area" made off-limits to American citizens of Japanese descent by Civilian Exclusion Order No. 34 of the Commanding General of the Western Command, U.S. Army during World War II. In 1982 Korematsu brought a coram nobis petition to have his conviction overturned. The standard for such a petition is high: only cases where the defendant can prove the most outrageous and obvious governmental misconduct will succeed. In 1983 the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California granted Korematsu's petition. How does the law allow such a thing as the Japanese American Internment to happen? What does the concept of "redress" mean in such a context? What is the role and responsibility of lawyers who defend such government actions?

What connection does this line of law have with the treatment of Muslims and immigrants today in the U.S.? Text:

Race, Rights & Reparation: Law and the Japanese American Internment By Eric Yamamoto, Margaret Chon (Second Edition) Credit/Evaluation: Regular attendance, thoughtful participation, weekly case briefs, oral presentations, and at least three revised papers. No more than three absences allowed.