COVID-19 Symptom Attestation

Courses

Fairhaven College Course Descriptions

Below you will find our current course descriptions.  Previous quarter course descriptions are also available by selecting the quarter and year you are searching for.  Electronic course descriptions are available back to winter 2009.  For information on days and times as well as location please visit ClassFinder.  To register for these classes log into Web4U. Important information about registration including deadlines and fees can be found on the Registrar's Office page.  For any questions about these course descriptions or for assistance with registration please call the Fairhaven College Office at 360-650-6680. For information on Fairhaven College Wait List Policies click here.

Fairhaven College Core Requirements:

Classes determined to satisfy a Fairhaven Core requirement will be identified using the following icons: 

Letter CRequired Core Music Note Humanities and the Expressive Arts II
Leaf iconScience and Our Place on the Planet II Human iconSociety and Individual II

Non-Fairhaven Students

Most Fairhaven classes open to all WWU students who meet the prerequisites in Phase II of registration.

FAIR 101A Intro to Interdisciplinary Study Required Core

Credits: 1

Instructor: Blick

Modality: Remote-Synchronous

This class aims to introduce students to Fairhaven College resources, practices, processes, and possibilities in their first quarter of enrollment in our program. Our class activities will include small group workshops, introductions to Fairhaven resources and people, community-based activities, and individual advising. We will introduce the educational practices used at Fairhaven (Writing Portfolio; Transition Conference; Independent Study, Interdisciplinary Concentration, Narrative Evaluations, etc.) and share the essentials you need to proceed toward your chosen major and take charge of your education.

Texts: There are no textbooks. Course materials provided in class and on Canvas.

Credit/Evaluation: This course part of the Fairhaven College Core Curriculum and is a graduation requirement. Award of credit will be based on documented attendance, participation, and completion of assignments as indicated in the class syllabus. Bring your curiosity, your questions, and your active engagement.

The learning outcomes for FAIR 101a include understanding resources, degree pathways, requirements, and pedagogy that are the mission and practice at Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies.

FAIR 201A Critical & Reflective Inquiry Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Friedland

Theme: Critical Creative Writing

In this introductory class we will discuss some key issues in creative writing, including the politics of craft, language diversity in creative writing, and questions of identity, representation, and appropriation. The course will give students the opportunity to engage with creative writing not merely as an imaginative practice but one that is deeply embedded in contemporary discussions of the relationship between art-making and politics.

Some questions we will pursue are: What is the ideology of "pure craft"? What limiting expectations or demands are placed on writers of specific identity categories? What ethical considerations are at stake in appropriative practices? We will be looking at "writings about writing" by contemporary writers such as Taiye Selasi, Alexander Chee, Bhanu Kapil and others, as well as engage in creative writing prompts that will challenge us to build our own creative practice in light of larger challenges and opportunities, formulating our own craft-criticism in the process.

FAIR 201A Critical & Reflective Inquiry Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Takagi

Theme: Journeys

Modality: Remote-Synchronous

In this section we will explore the different kinds of journeys Americans have been taking over the centuries, and how they make sense of those life travels, through texts, films and through class discussion. In addition, we will embark on an intellectual journey, which will include developing and honing the skills, tools and knowledge to be a strong student and a productive, responsible member of the larger community. For each class member, this part of the journey will include identifying and analyzing one's voice and the privileges and burdens built into that voice, identifying and analyzing others' voices and building respect for those diverse perspectives, and to critically assess all forms of information (oral, written and visual).

The main skill emphasized in this class will be writing. During the quarter you will sharpen and hone your writing skills. You will learn to construct an argument, gather evidence, shape your thesis to fit the audience, and organize your thoughts. In addition, you will also learn to seminar, peer edit papers, and critically analyze materials. Finally, you will learn to research and write a 6-8 page research paper with a minimum of 4 sources, proper citations and a bibliography.

 

Required Reading To be determined Readings on Canvas. Additional requirements:

-Bring the articles or solid notes based on the readings to help guide you through the discussions. -Regular attendance. 2 absences will reflect negatively on your evaluation. 3 absences and you will not receive credit for the class. If you are sick, please let me know. If there is a personal/family difficulty, please let me know as soon as possible. -All papers must be typed, double-spaced, and with proper citations. Chicago, MLA or APA are acceptable. It does not matter which style you use, but it must be consistent and correct. I prefer that all assignments be uploaded onto Canvas and, on occasions, a hard copy brought to class. -Active participation in class and small group discussions. If you are uncomfortable with speaking in front of people, please see me as soon as possible.

Paper requirements: Because there are numerous writing assignments, timely submission is absolutely required. Only 1 late assignment will be accepted. No other late assignments will be accepted and your tardiness will be noted on your evaluation. One biographical journey paper (2 pages, double-spaced). One reflection paper (2 pages, double-spaced) no citations needed. One research paper proposal (pages 1-2 only). One early draft of research paper (4 pages) plus citations. One full draft of Research paper (rough draft 6-8 pages) the research paper. Double-spaced + 12-point font, one-inch margins all around, and proper citations. Final version of research paper (6-8 pages, double-spaced) + proper citations. Writing plan due

 

FAIR 202A Core: Humanities & Expressive Arts I Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Feodorov

Modality: Remote-Synchronous

Description: Throughout history art has both adorned and justified the lifestyles of the rich and famous. From huge idealized statues of rulers to the often-frilly paintings of 18th Century French Rococo, art has both pandered to and titillated the upper classes. However, it is a rash over-simplification to dismiss the entire history of Art as catering only to the tastes and values of the wealthy and powerful. In this course we will not only investigate how art has been complicit with power, but also how artists and theorists both create and advocate for art that critiques and resists power, voices their experiences and identities, promotes and supports social change, and envisions alternative futures. In addition, students will create 3 visual art projects based upon the themes discussed in class, write short response papers to required readings, and actively participate in class discussions. Students will also research and give a verbal presentation in class on a visual artist whose work they admire and fits within the theme of the course. Note: While course fees go to providing some basic art supplies, students will still need to purchase their own to use at home. What these are will of course depend upon what each student chooses to use for their projects. A suggested supplies list will be forwarded to registered students before the quarter begins.

Text: No text is required. However, required readings will be made available on Canvas or online.

Credit and Evaluation: Evaluation is based upon regular and attentive attendance, timely and thoughtful completion of all assignments, informed and consistent participation in class discussions, and demonstrated commitment and engagement with their projects. More than three unexcused absences will result in no credit being awarded.

FAIR 203A Social Relationships and Responsibilities Required Core

Credits: 5

Modality: Remote-Synchronous

Theme: Foundations of political economy, social theory and democratic life.

This course begins with a study of foundational concepts in political economy and social theory. We will examine basic terms in political thinking (power, liberty, equality, law, class, status, political legitimacy, and others) as developed by John Locke, Adam Smith, Karl Marx and Max Weber. We will then turn to the case of democracy in America (reading selections from the Federalist papers, de Tocqueville, W.E.B. Du Bois, Friedrich Hayek, Charles Mills, Judith Butler and others) to consider the nature of democratic values, organization, and practice. We will close out the course pursuing the question of art proper to democracy with an emphasis on music (reading Jack Wright's The Free Musics and Joe Morris' Perpetual Frontier: The Properties of Free Music). The course draws from diverse fields including liberal and neoliberal political thought, political economy, critical race theory, feminism, literature, sociology, political science, and improvisational (free) music. The course of study develops critical skills in political thinking and assessment with a focus on "liberalism and its critics" as well as examining the creative potential and power in democratic form.

Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will include regular attendance; active and engaged participation in class discussions; facilitating discussion and distributing a response paper on an assigned article; submitting a handful or short response papers over the course of the quarter, and submitting either 2 medium or 1 longer essay incorporating the response papers.

FAIR 203A Social Relationships and Responsibilities Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Miyake

Modality: Remote-Synchronous

Theme: Whiteness Studies

Through this course, students will examine both the history of the representation of race and whiteness in the United States and Western Europe and also the ways in which such representations have been shaped by cultural, political, historical, social, and economic forces and contexts in political and economic structures, academia, the mass media, and popular culture. Students will examine a wide range of works related to this increasingly established field of inquiry regarding these issues from the fields of anthropology, history, sociology, political science, and cultural studies. These readings and class discussions will emphasize the ways in which multiple discourses from each of these different fields of study have impacted each other and worked both in unison and tension to influence the ways in which the study and concepts of race and whiteness have been perceived and portrayed over the past several centuries.

FAIR 203A Social Relationships and Responsibilities Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Gutierrez Najera

Modality: Remote-Synchronous

Theme: Borders and Boundaries

This class provides an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the formation, maintenance and endurance of borders and boundaries. It asks: What are borders? What purpose do borders serve? Why do they endure? Since there is no single agreed upon definition of "borders" we explore three main dimensions of borders as symbolic, geopolitical and cultural boundaries. In so doing we analyze their multiple dimensions as territorial entities, legal demarcations, institutions, sites and symbols of power, racial and ethnic boundaries, liminal spaces, and metaphorical constructs. As we gain deeper understanding we will see that borders, no matter what form they may take, are used to separate nations, people, spaces, in such a way that difference is imbued with power. Course readings engage scholars from multiple disciplines including anthropology, geography, history, political science and sociology, with cases studies from around the globe including Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, and the U.S.

Foundational readings (available on Canvas) include scholarship by Frederik Barth, Hastings Donnan and Thomas M. Wilson, Roxanne Doty, Michelle Lamont, Joseph Nevins, and Dan Rabinowitz.

FAIR 206A Core: Science & Our Place on the Planet I Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Tuxill

Modality: Remote-Synchronous

Read the list of ingredients on a cereal box. Ponder the sleek form and intricate circuitry of a smartphone. Turn on a light switch, or step on board a new hybrid city bus. Where do the raw materials and natural resources that make modern life possible come from? Where, how and by whom are they turned into what anthropologists call our material culture--the stuff we take for granted every day? And what happens to our stuff once we discard it? This course examines the global ecological and social impacts of modern consumer demands in the U.S.A. and worldwide. We will trace the origins of the things we use everyday, and identify the end destinations of our stuff once we no longer have use for it. Our goals will be three-fold: 1) to study natural resource extraction patterns and global supply chains for raw materials used in modern consumer goods; 2) to identify and quantify the ecological and social impacts of these global supply chains; and 3) critically analyze current programs, initiatives, and policies that seek to make consumer goods more sustainable.

Along the way we will gain fluency in foundational concepts that are crucial for understanding sustainability, such as ecosystem functions, the impacts of population versus consumption, lifecycle analysis, the relationship between sustainability and resiliency, and strategies for coping with global ecological change. Texts and Materials: Confessions of an Eco-Sinner, by Fred Pearce. Additional reading assignments will be drawn from a broad range of academic and applied literature and distributed in PDF format via Canvas. All reading assignments are due for the class they are listed in the syllabus.

FAIR 215F The Asian American Experience

Credits: 4

Instructor: Takagi

Modality: Remote-Synchronous

This is an introduction to the history and experience of Asians in America. This class will explore the factors for immigration, working and living conditions of Asian laborers in this country, and the social relations between the minority and majority, as well as those between the various Asian ethnic groups. Reading Requirements: Erika Lee, The Making of Asian America, A History Articles on Canvas

Written Requirements: Annotated bibliographies of the readings. 1 paper (10 pages), This is a joint project. Take home exam.

FAIR 221J Interdisciplinary Writing

Credits: 5

Instructor: Simon

Modality: Remote-Synchronous In our message-dense digital age, innovators must explain their ideas clearly and compellingly, and in various forms. This course is a craft / writing workshop in which students incorporate the art of storytelling to write creative researched personal essays, primarily, based on their own interests, or on their work in their individualized majors or courses of study. Here, you can sharpen your chops for explaining, illustrating, and illuminating your ideas in writing, and use the crucial tools of elemental analysis and the creative writing workshop to hone your skills for persuasion through storytelling. You will learn to report your findings in creative and compelling new ways that could work as or inform pieces of long-form journalism, as blog posts, as nonfiction book chapters, radio programs, podcasts, or some other new or not yet imagined form. In this first course in the sequence, we will work primarily in researched personal essay, and will study exemplars of the form, as well as strategies for basic argument, logic, and critical reading and thinking.

Credit/evaluation: written assignments and revisions, written and oral critique of classmates' work, and regular attendance.

Texts: Readings will be provided. Students will provide hard copies of their work for classmates.

FAIR 222G Imaginative Writing: Poetry

Credits: 4

Instructor: Tag

Modality: Remote-Synchronous

"Poetry is the language of being: the breath, the voice, the song, the speech of being. It does not need us. We are the ones in need of it."--Robert Bringhurst

Where does poetry come from? Where do we hear it, feel it, breathe it? How do we participate in its expression, its creation? What does it do to us? Rita Dove said, "Poetry is language at its most distilled and most powerful." Emily Dickinson said, "If I read a book and it makes my whole body so cold no fire can warm me, I know that is poetry. If I feel physically as if the top of my head were taken off, I know that is poetry." Marianne Moore said that poems are "imaginary gardens with real toads in them." What do we need for us to engage in the writing, making, singing, and creating of poetry? How might you dwell in the possibility of poetry? What body electrics do you have it in you to sing? What voices live inside you? Andrea Gibson said, "I am whatever I am when I am it." How might you grow outward into the world? Lucille Clifton discovered that the earth "is a black shambling bear / ruffling its wild back and tossing / mountains into the sea."

This course is an invitation to immerse yourself in the language of being: poetry. All are welcome to join us. No previous experience is required. We will explore what it means to breathe, to live as creatures of rhythm, to delight in pattern, to illuminate images and moments, to sing, and to let words trip the light fantastic along our tongues. We will read ancient and contemporary poetry, listen to poetry, discuss poetry, cook poetry, eat poetry, make poetry, speak poetry, walk poetry, and discover poetry in strange and ordinary places in our lives. Be prepared to experiment, take risks, work hard, ask lots of questions, and write and write and write.

Coursework: Weekly poems, writing exercises, a writing notebook, and several reflection essays. Presence: being in class every day. Active participation in class discussions, group work, class activities, and a final poetry reading. Completion of a portfolio of at least ten poems.

Texts: Sarah Kay, NO MATTER THE WRECKAGE; Ocean Vuong, NIGHT SKY WITH EXIT WOUNDS.

FAIR 246 Mariachi Music, Performance & Culture

Credits: 3

Instructor: Miyake

Modality: Remote-Synchronous

This course is repeatable for up to a total of twelve (12) credits. Ever since its establishment as a centerpiece of Mexican popular culture in the first half of the 20th century, Mariachi music has acted both as a central expression of Mexican identity and also as one of the most widely recognized representations of Mexican people and culture for those outside of this community. Students in this class will explore this cultural and artistic movement through both academic engagement and hands-on experience in creating this music themselves. Class meetings will include sessions in which we will discuss academic and popular texts on Mariachi music and culture as well as participating in discussions with guest speakers and performers, and sessions in which class members will learn to perform Mariachi music in both individual and ensemble formats. No experience in performing Mariachi music is required for this class- all instruction and expected musical collaborations will be designed to fit the experience level of each individual student.

Required Texts: Wade, Bonnie C. Thinking Musically: Experiencing Music, Expressing Culture. 3rd ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 2013. Sheehy, Daniel Edward. Mariachi Music in America: Experiencing Music, Expressing Culture. New York: Oxford University Press, 2006. Texts for this course will also include other articles, book chapters, and music as assigned by the instructor. NB: Alternate readings will be provided for students who have already received credit for this course in an earlier quarter.

Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will take account of regular attendance, evidence of critical reading, engagement in class discussion and completion of assignments.

FAIR 255Y Folk Music Experience

Credits: 2

Instructor: Bower

Modality: Remote-Synchronous

Theme: 50 Years of Fairhaven Music

In this pandemic version of the Folk Music Experience we will be entertained and taught by the musicians whose careers started or were furthered while students at Fairhaven College and WWU.  These musicians, who span the years from the 1970’s to the current decade, and also span a wide range of genres, will perform a concert at our Thursday evening class meetings.  On the following Tuesday we will sometimes be visited by the musicians and will hear the stories of how their music careers got started and developed over time.  We will also study the both the genre the musicians belong to and how their music relates to what was happening in society at the time they launched their careers.  On at least one of the quarter’s Thursdays we will host an open mike and students will get the chance (optional) to perform songs for the rest of the class on Tuesdays.  This class is designed to be a de-stressor, not a stressor, so sign up and have some fun with us winter 2021, and learn some stuff too!

Texts: Texts will change from quarter to quarter.  For this quarter, all readings will be on-line or in Canvas.   

Credit/Evaluation:  Regular attendance and informed participation in class discussions.

FAIR 270B Intro to Digital Video Production

Credits: 2

Instructor: Miller

Modality: Remote-Synchronous

This class will introduce basic camera use and video editing in the digital medium. Students will script, shoot, and edit 5 assignments using Final Cut Pro. Projects range from a 30-second commercial to a 3-5 minute final video on the student's choice of topic. S/U grading.

FAIR 270H Intro to Audio Recording

Credits: 4

Instructor: Wallace

Modality: Hybrid, combination of remote synchronous work and small group in-person studio work.  

Introduction to Audio explores the techniques, tools, and technology used in multi-track recording. From a beginner's perspective, this course works to develop the fundamental skills of critical listening, analog signal flow, and basic analog/digital hybrid recording. By examining the various steps in the recording process students will learn the concepts and skills necessary to use studio equipment such as microphones (their characteristics and placement), mixing consoles (explained in detail), hard disk recording, patch bays, signal and effect processors, and headphone systems. Each student is also expected to attend a weekly two-hour small group lab, held in the studio, giving the student a chance to experience multi-track recording in a hands-on manner.

Texts: Modern Recording Techniques (9th edition) by David Miles Huber and selected readings from The Audio Expert by Ethan Winer. Excerpts from the Audio Expert text will be available online.

Credit/Evaluation: Students will be evaluated through a combination of participation, attendance (lab and lecture), reading assignments, and understanding gained from the material evaluated from a hands-on assessment. Additionally, students will be required to complete a basic tracking session with their lab assistant in the studio as a final project.

FAIR 297X Experiential Learning Outback: Winter

Credits: 1

Instructor: Kempton

Modality: Face to Face, this course meets in the Outback Farm

This course provides an opportunity for students to explore the Outback while we discuss food, farming, sustainability, and methods for regenerating the environment. FA 297 will cover seasonal aspects of farm work, ecosystem maintenance, and important late-winter tasks like pruning and inoculating mushroom logs.

Class sessions are two hours each week in the Outback Farm; in addition, students will have reading assignments, a small independent project to illustrate an idea to improve an aspect/area of the farm, and a final self-evaluation.

FAIR 303A Core: Interdisciplinary Concentration Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Akinrinade

Prerequisites: FAIR 101A, FAIR 201A, FAIR 203A, FAIR 305A

What questions do you want to explore in your Interdisciplinary Concentration? (Are you asking questions, for example, about inequalities, ecology, musical cultures, or performance?) Why are these questions important enough intellectually, politically, socially or professionally to form the basis for your Interdisciplinary Concentration?

Your challenge in the Concentration Seminar is a two- or three-fold one. First, you must answer the question of why your concentration matters to your own satisfaction. Second, you want to communicate the reasons why your concentration's questions matter to the mythical "average reader" in your rationale. Third, you must identify the set of courses, independent study projects, internships, or other forms of experiential learning that allow you to explore your underlying questions about your subject in the rest of your time at Fairhaven College.

In practical terms, the seminar is designed to assist you with your development and writing of an interdisciplinary concentration. It will serve as a forum for discussion, guidance, and support during the proposal writing process. You will work collaboratively with your seminar, your instructor, and your concentration committee, to write your learning proposal and identify relevant courses and experiences to help you achieve your educational goals.

Here are some of the practical questions this seminar will help to address: - What are the appropriate guidelines and requirements involved? - What exactly is it you want to achieve in your degree? - How can your intentions be given effective shape and form? - Who should be on your committee? - How do the parts of your concentration work together conceptually? - What are the best vehicles for your learning? - What should you put in and what should you leave out of your concentration?

Text: Handbook on Canvas + Occasional Readings distributed in class

Credit/Evaluation: Faithful preparation for and attendance at seminar; Steady work on your proposal; Contributions to the development of your group members' proposals. Credit for the course is granted when your completed committee-approved proposal has been filed with the Fairhaven Curriculum & Records Manager and a regular self-evaluation form is submitted to the instructor.

FAIR 303A Core: Interdisciplinary Concentration Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Pierce

Prerequisites: FAIR 101A, FAIR 201A, FAIR 203A, FAIR 305A

What questions do you want to explore in your Interdisciplinary Concentration? (Are you asking questions, for example, about inequalities, ecology, musical cultures, or performance?) Why are these questions important enough intellectually, politically, socially or professionally to form the basis for your Interdisciplinary Concentration?

Your challenge in the Concentration Seminar is a two- or three-fold one. First, you must answer the question of why your concentration matters to your own satisfaction. Second, you want to communicate the reasons why your concentration's questions matter to the mythical "average reader" in your rationale. Third, you must identify the set of courses, independent study projects, internships, or other forms of experiential learning that allow you to explore your underlying questions about your subject in the rest of your time at Fairhaven College.

In practical terms, the seminar is designed to assist you with your development and writing of an interdisciplinary concentration. It will serve as a forum for discussion, guidance, and support during the proposal writing process. You will work collaboratively with your seminar, your instructor, and your concentration committee, to write your learning proposal and identify relevant courses and experiences to help you achieve your educational goals.

Here are some of the practical questions this seminar will help to address: - What are the appropriate guidelines and requirements involved? - What exactly is it you want to achieve in your degree? - How can your intentions be given effective shape and form? - Who should be on your committee? - How do the parts of your concentration work together conceptually? - What are the best vehicles for your learning? - What should you put in and what should you leave out of your concentration?

Text: Handbook on Canvas + Occasional Readings distributed in class

Credit/Evaluation: Faithful preparation for and attendance at seminar; Steady work on your proposal; Contributions to the development of your group members' proposals. Credit for the course is granted when your completed committee-approved proposal has been filed with the Fairhaven Curriculum & Records Manager and a regular self-evaluation form is submitted to the instructor.

FAIR 305A Writing & Transition Conference Required Core

Credits: 3

Instructor: Miyake

Modality: Remote-Asynchronous

The Writing Portfolio and Transition Conference are Core graduation requirements for all Fairhaven College students.

Your Writing Portfolio will be a selective collection of your academic writing and an introductory statement of self-assessment about your writing at this point in your education. It will be reviewed and assessed by your Fairhaven faculty advisor.

Your Transition Conference is a constructive mid-point conversation with advising resource people you invite to share your educational plans and collect advice officially moving you from the "Exploratory" stage of Fairhaven's program into the "Concentrated" stage of your educational plans, regardless of your choice of major. You should embark on these requirements when you and your faculty advisor agree you're ready for them.

All students in FAIR 305A must attend one orientation meeting early in the quarter. Details about the orientation meeting schedule will be sent to all enrolled students via email and posted on the FAIR 305A class CANVAS site.

In order to receive credit for FAIR 305A you must: 1) Submit your Writing Portfolio prepared according to specifications to be provided at our orientation and on our class Canvas site. 2) Schedule and conduct a Transition Conference which includes writing and circulating a Transition Conference Statement to your invited participants prior to the conference.

Additional details and instructions will be provided at our orientation and on our class Canvas site.

FAIR 314E Critical Pedagogy Society and Individual 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Calderon

Modality: Remote-Synchronous

In this course we will draw from empirical research to examine the social, political, economic, and historical context of schooling for students of color in U.S. K-12 and higher educational systems. Students will be introduced to a set of ethnic studies concepts and theories from which to better understand the educational experiences and realities of historically underrepresented students. The course will also challenge students to reflect on their educational experiences and the schooling conditions of students of color in general, and to apply the concepts introduced in class to their own educational experiences.

More specifically, the course is intended to enable students to: 1)Develop an understanding of the histories, concepts, perspectives, and theories used to examine the complex realities of historically underrepresented students; 2)Articulate their understanding of concepts such as privilege, microagressions, institutional racism, whiteness, resistance, decolonization, and activism, and apply these concepts to their personal educational experiences and to the debate over educational (under)achievement, (in)equity, and the politics of education; 3)Engage in inter-ethnic/racial dialogues about race and racism, the use of power and privilege to institutionalize inequity, methods for achieving social and educational change.

Texts: Pedagogy of the Oppressed, Teaching to Transgress, Juarez Girls Rising, and various research articles.

Credit/Evaluation (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory): Evaluation will take account of regular attendance, evidence of critical reading, engagement in class discussion, and completion of assignments.

FAIR 334L The Holocaust Society and Individual 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Akinrinade

Modality: Remote-Synchronous

This course is an interdisciplinary examination of the origins, course, and aftermath of the Nazi Holocaust. It situates the Holocaust within the context of World War II and the multiple genocides that occurred around the world in the twentieth century. The class traces the development of Nazism, and discusses the causes, progression, and development of the onslaught against the Jews and Nazi efforts to eliminate other groups across borders and nationalities deemed to be a threat to German racial superiority. The class will pay attention to the ways in which Jews and other targeted groups responded to the crisis. It will also examine survivor accounts (including the impact on children of the victims and perpetrators), and issues of memorialization, politicization, representation, and sacralization of the Nazi Holocaust. At the end of the course, students will have attained a thorough, nuanced, and interdisciplinary understanding, as well as the international context of the Holocaust.

Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will take account of regular attendance, evidence of critical reading, engagement in class discussion, the quality of short reactions, and two assignments. There will be no course credit for anyone who misses three (3) classes in the quarter.

TEXT: War and Genocide: A Concise History of the Holocaust: by Bergen, Doris, (3rd ed., 2016); Various readings assigned through Canvas

FAIR 335M Nutrition and Public Health Science and Our Place on the Planet 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Schwandt

Course Description: In the first phase of this course we will cover the biology of nutrition and work as a learning community to answer the following questions: What happens inside our bodies when we eat food? How do our bodies break down food and use the nutrients from the food we eat for energy and growth? What types of nutrients do we need? Why does this differ by country/culture? How much of each nutrient do we need? Where does each essential vitamin and mineral come from? Why do our bodies need essential vitamins and minerals? Can vitamin or mineral supplements meet our nutritional needs as well as the naturally occurring forms? In the second phase of the course we will build on our understanding of nutrition and discuss various types of malnutrition, such as: starvation, eating disorders, and obesity; as well as a variety of metabolic disorders and food allergies. In this class we will always include a discussion on the impact of diet on health with every topic covered. We will also explore inequities in nutrition - why they might exist and what types of programs have been piloted to address the inequities.

Required Text: Nina Planck, Real Food: What to Eat and Why (Bloomsbury, USA, New York, 2006) Walter C. Willett, Eat, Drink, and Be Healthy (Free Press, USA, New York, 2001) Carol Ann Rinzler, Nutrition for Dummies (Wiley Publishing, Inc., New Jersey, 2011)

Credit/Evaluation: Students will be evaluated on their attendance, preparation for - via reading reflections, and participation in course discussions. Each student will choose a diet to research and will cook a meal that follows the diet and share that process with the class. The student will also give a short presentation on the diet. Finally, each student will work independently on a nutrition research presentation and two drafts of a research paper (2000 words).

FAIR 336B Understanding & Confronting Racism Society and Individual 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Villicana

Modality: Remote-Synchronous

Description: Race is a social construction that has interfered with basic human understanding and interactions across this artificial boundary. Racism is an oppressive structure underlying a system--expressed by individuals, institutions, and cultural tools--by which racial groups are assigned disadvantages and advantages that create division and social hierarchies. In this course, we will explore social and psychological issues related to racial categorization from a historical and social psychological perspective. We will also examine psychological theories and empirical findings related to racism i) to develop a critical awareness of race and racism issues in the USA and 2) to develop valid ways of addressing and confronting racism in your everyday experience. Some sample topics that we will cover are: racial identity, underlying mechanism that maintain racism (e.g., meritocracy, colorblindness), cognitive process involved in racial perception (e.g., stereotyping, decision-making), and allyship.

Required Texts: Readings will be posted on Canvas and will primarily be empirical readings from the social psychological literature (from both the "social psychology" within psychology, and the "social psychology" within sociology).

Criteria for Evaluation: Regular attendance to online class/discussion/activity sessions (i.e., no more than 3 absences); active and engaged participation in class discussions and debate; a 2-3-page racism analysis paper; a 2-3-page racism intervention pitch; and a 2-page paper on implicit bias activity. All students will also be expected to submit two, 10-minute (max) teaching videos on related course content.

FAIR 336B Power to the People Society and Individual 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Michael Schulze-Oechtering

Modality: Remote-Synchronous

This course is designed to introduce students to the parallel and overlapping freedom movements of the "long 1960s" (social movements that span the 1950s to the 1970s) - The Black Freedom Movement (Civil Rights and Black Power), American Indian Movement, Chicanx/Latinx Movement, and Asian American Movement. While each respective movement will be studied at length independently, our lectures, readings, and discussions will question the assumed racial homogeneity of each movement. A key concern of the course will be a collective exploration of social movements, political ideas, and individual activists that crossed racial, gendered, and national boundaries in their pursuit for freedom and dignity. Additionally, connections will be made to contemporary social justice movements, such as the abolition of police, prisons, and borders, indigenous sovereignty, student movements for Ethnic Studies, and local efforts to build solidarity economies.

Credit/Evaluation: Attendance and Engaged Participation; weekly group discussion posts, facilitating discussion about an assigned reading; two 4-5-page essays, and a final group project.

Required Texts: While all readings will be available via the Canvas, the following is a list of selected course readings. Please keep in mind, we will not read these texts in their entirety, only specific chapters.

Select Reading List: Robyn Spencer, The Revolution Has Come: Black Power, Gender, and the Black Panther Party in Oakland

Johanna Fernandez, The Young Lords: A Radical History Carlos Munoz Jr., Youth, Identity, and Power: The Chicano Movement Kent Blansett, A Journey to Freedom: Richard Oakes, Alcatraz, and the Red Power Movement; Daryl Maeda, Chains of Babylon: The Rise of Asian America

FAIR 336M Minimalism & Art of Repetition Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Sehman

Modality: Remote-Synchronous

What happens when we strip art and music of all but its core components? Important questions emerge:

  • What are 19 identical conical objects, placed on a gallery floor, meant to express? And is that even the right question to ask of these objects? (Eva Hesse: Repetition Nineteen III, 1968)
  • How does one listen to a piece of music, consisting of a single tape loop, repeating a single sentence, for 20 minutes? What can that repeating statement express, that a single statement cannot? (Steve Reich: Come Out, 1966)
  • How do we account for the lived experience of these artworks? Why can they feel transcendent in one moment, yet suffocating the next? What’s the difference between listening for 5 minutes vs. 60?

Minimalism, as an artistic style, challenges deeply held notions of narrative and expression in art and music. And in this course, we use these questions as a point of departure for broad discussions around artistic expression in our world.

This course will explore the Minimalist style in music and art, from its roots in 1960s experimental art practices and counter culture communities, to current trends in electronic and experimental music styles.

We will explore music from some of the pioneers of the style (La Monte Young, Éliane Radigue). And then examine ways the minimalist style can be heard in a wide array of music, from early house and dance music (Donna Summer, Frankie Knuckles), film scores (Koyaanisqatsi), to art rock (The Velvet Underground). And beyond: students are encouraged to listen around them, and bring the music they know into the conversation.

Special emphasis will be given to critical listening. Students will listen to a wide array of music, chosen by the instructor and the class, and compile a listening journal over the course of the term. No technical experience with music is required for this class. Rather, students of any background are simply asked to openly and actively engage with art and music.

Text: Readings will be compiled from various online and print sources. Note also that listening is a large component of this course.

Requirements/Evaluation

-Students will be expected to complete all reading and listening assignments, and actively participate in class discussions centered around these.

-Students will create a listening journal, based on their personal listening experiences.

-There will be brief, weekly written responses associated with readings and listening examples.

-Students will complete a final creative project in their chosen media (visual arts, sculpture, sound, video, music, written/spoken word). (No experience with art making required!)

FAIR 336N Global Food Sovereignty Science and Our Place on the Planet 2

Credits: 4

This class will be taught in a Remote-Blended Format with online synchronous class held on Tuesdays.

Food sovereignty is the right of people to define their own food systems. We will examine the science of food sovereignty within a regional and global context. The class will also explore organizations and policies that influence food system processes. In a remote, blended format students will reflect on course texts and related articles and videos from several contemporary food sovereignty thinkers and activists. Guest speakers will be engaged in a variety of local and national food sovereignty issues. We will focus specifically on food science, farming, soil health, Pacific Northwest food traditions, and concepts of health. In the final section of the course, students will be asked to investigate food sovereignty in their own lives and present this experiential learning and reflection to the class.

REQUIRED TEXTS: В· Food and Society by Amy Guptill, Denise Copelton, Betsy Lucal** В· One Size Fits None by Stephanie Anderson **Available digitally via WWU Library Additional Readings will be provided on CANVAS.

LEARNING OUTCOMES: В· Define food sovereignty В· Apply biological, ecological and social concepts to global food systems В· Identify food access, security, and justice issues on regional and global levels В· Determine and recognize Pacific Northwest traditional foods and their social and economic relevance

EVALUATION: Participation in class discussions and guest speaker events, timely completion of readings, completion of i) weekly response papers and a ii) final independent project.

FAIR 336N Ecology Science and Our Place on the Planet 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Lloyd

Modality: Hybrid, combination of remote work and in-person field work.

Ecology is the study of how organisms interact with their physical environment and with each other. The primary goal of this course is to provide you with an understanding of the fundamental concepts of ecology and the ways in which physical, chemical and ecological factors interact to shape the structure and dynamics of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. You will gain familiarity with many of the ways we think about organisms interacting with each other and their environment, and hopefully feel confident deciphering relationships you see in the wild or read about in the literature with the conceptual tools you acquire.

Text: Ecology by William Bowman, Slaly Hacker, Michael L. Cain.

FAIR 336V Constructing Interventions Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 5

Modality: Remote-Blended (combination of synchronous and asynchronous work)

The interdisciplinary genre of intervention in contemporary art weaponizes what art can do to structures of power in uncertain situations. In May '68 in Paris, the anti-fascist movements in Chile and Argentina of the 70s and 80s, or Occupy Wall Street in 2011, art interventions have incited, given form to, and helped sustain long-term rebellions. Moreover, within such massive historical events, and more rarely discussed, some of the most beautiful interventions originate in artists' personal and inherited memory.

For instance, during the Idle No More movement among First Nations in Canada, KwakwaМ±kaМ±'wakw artist Chief Beau Dick journeyed to shame centers of Canadian power in Lalakenis I (2013) and Lalakenis II (2014). These actions developed from Dick's memory of an uncle's passing anecdote, which dreamed of rectifying a highly meaningful yet dormant traditional ceremony. Slightly earlier, in 2006, at the onset of the US occupation of Iraq and wide-spread anti-Arab racism, artist Michael Rakowitz re-opened his Iraqi grandfather's import-export business by installing a temporary storefront in Brooklyn. Doing so, he defiantly claimed a cultural history in an environment trying to destroy it, while simultaneously inviting New Yorkers to participate in the impossible task of making an exchange with an economy under siege.

In this studio course, students will attempt to construct their own interventions by integrating familiar everyday acts (i.e. walking, praying, cooking) with contemporary media (i.e. installation, performance, video) which we will conceive through memory exercises and the exploration of what is politically urgent. We will ground this process in a sustained encounter with local struggles in Whatcom County, in order to energize studio time and contextualize the larger significance of our personal memories and artistic visions. So, in addition to learning from related contemporary artists and hands-on practices, we will listen to local activists and community organizers, visit (if possible) archives and sites. Students will learn how to take these kinds of direct encounters and form them into art interventions that contribute to a particular struggle for justice while implicating the role of their own histories, bodies, families, and cultures.

Students regardless of skill or experience in fine art are welcome to register.

FAIR 336V Art & Identity Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Feodorov

Modality: Remote-Synchronous.

(Please note that this is a 300-level studio art course. Prior experience in drawing and two-dimensional art-making is required since the course assumes students have already developed some basic drawing skills.)

In her 2001 essay, "The Art of Testimony", author Carol Becker wrote, "So much of the work that has infuriated politicians [...] was art that provided personal testimony, work that said, 'This is my experience of daily life. Here is how I am seen or not seen in America and in the world.'"

In this course, students will use art-making (2-D, 3-D, Video, Sound/Music) as a means of exploring, questioning, expressing and experimenting with concepts of Identity and Intersectionality as they apply to their own lives and communities. Students are encouraged to think deeply and honestly about who they are, who they think they are, and what this might mean both individually and as members of a community. Students will also reflect upon whether Identity entails an awareness and understanding of social responsibility. However, the goal of this course is not to define what that responsibility might/should look like. Rather, the objective is to use art-making as an exploration and intentional voicing of who we are and why that matters. Students will create several art projects based on Identity that are tailored to their individual situations. These could range anywhere between self-exploration to advocacy and activism. We will also have frequent class discussions regarding strategies, required readings and examples of artists who work with issues of Identity. Students will also give a presentation to the class on an artist whose work centers on issues of Identity.

Textbook: None, but required readings will be available on Canvas or online.

Credit and Evaluation: Students will be evaluated based upon their commitment to their projects, regular and punctual attendance, active and informed participation in class discussions and workshops, and the timely completion of all projects, sketchbook, and required readings and assignments. Students are expected to challenge themselves both creatively and intellectually. An open-mind and enthusiasm for your work is essential for successful completion of this class. S/U grading.

FAIR 336V Arts as Therapy Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 4

Modality: Remote-Synchronous

Pre-requisites: Fairhaven 202a or equivalent.

Not arts courses or skill required. This course explores expressive arts therapies including: visual art, music, dance and poetry therapy. Arts therapies are based on the concept that the use of imagination and creative expression is essential to health and well-being. Most arts therapists believe that the capacity for healing through arts stems from the personal insights and guidance one gains from participating in creative processes. Historically, humans have used the arts consistently as a healing modality. Some key questions we explore in this course are: What are the creative arts therapies? How do they engage the mind, body and spirit? How have these therapies evolved? What have they become in our current culture and where have they found effective use? What challenges do arts therapists experience? How does one become certified in an arts therapy? To guide the learning process, this course uses text and article readings, videos, class experiences and discussion, arts activities and presentations by certified arts therapists or practitioners.

Course Learning Objectives: >to explore various art therapies including music, visual arts, poetry story, dance, and integrated art therapies >to examine the creative process and its relationship to health and wellness through personal experience and examination of programs and case studies >to understand how peoples have developed and are using the arts to heal and gain critical personal insights. This course involves some experiential elements. Students taking this course should be comfortable and/or willing to explore their own creativity and experience arts therapy practices in a group setting. The course is not designed to provide therapeutic interventions or to resolve personal issues. The course does not provide a certification to practice arts therapies but does offer information about how one becomes a certified practitioner.

Required Text >Trauma and Expressive Arts Therapies: Brain, Body and Imagination in the Healing Process, The Guilford Press, 2020. Optional Book >Process Not Perfection: Expressive Arts Solutions for Trauma Recovery by Jamie Marich, Creative Mindfulness Media: Warren, Ohio, 2009 Additional article and journal readings will be provided electronically.

Recommended Materials:

ART SUPPLIES You will need a minimum amount of art supplies. We are covering many arts areas so our visual artwork time will be limited. Below are links for purchasing items on Amazon. Our Bookstore also carries similar art supplies at a great price. The cost should be under $15 (plus shipping). You may have similar items which would be sufficient. If you have any problems with purchasing these or cannot afford them, please send me your shipping address once you are registered and I will order these at no cost to you. I normally provide materials to use in class but if we are learning remotely each student will need their own set. Also, please avoid going shopping in person, or use all virus prevention strategies, for purchasing supplies during the pandemic! Pentel Arts Oil Pastels, 12 color set (PHN-12) Crayola Broad-Lined Markers You will also want unlined white paper-- regular 8 ВЅ x 11 computer paper is sufficient. If you want larger or slightly heavier paper, which has some advantages, you can order a tablet of student-grade drawing paper--smooth surface is best.

Reliable attendance and active involvement are key requirements for this course. Students will be asked to complete the following demonstrations of learning: 1.complete all assigned readings 2.participate in class activities and experiential arts therapy demonstrations 3.write a response to demonstrations, activities and readings as requested 4.research a specific arts therapy topic, technique or related area of interest. Write a paper and do a class presentation on findings.

FAIR 340T Psych of Sexual Orientation Society and Individual 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Delucio

Modality: Remote-Blended (combination of synchronous and asynchronous work)

Description: Through this course students will explore theoretical perspectives, empirical findings, and applied topics regarding the psychology of sexual orientation. By examining the current state of psychological knowledge and narratives around sexual orientation, we will consider various aspects of the lives of individuals who identify as gay, lesbian, bisexual, pansexual, heterosexual, queer, and beyond. Topics of exploration will include: identity development, stigma and minority stress, adolescence, relationships, aging, workplace issues, mental and physical health, therapy and intervention, and cultural influences. We will also explore how heterosexism intersects with other systems of oppression (e.g., racism, sexism) to impact the lived experience(s) of individuals and communities reflecting a marginalized sexual orientation.

Optional Text: Patterson, C.J., & D'Augelli, A.R. (Eds.) (2015). Handbook of psychology and sexual orientation. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

Recommended reference: American Psychological Association. (2020). Publication manual of the American Psychological Association (7th ed.). Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association. Additional course readings will be provided on Canvas. Criteria for Credit/Evaluation: Regular attendance; active and engaged participation in class discussions; a reflective paper outlining personal sexual orientation development and understanding; a media reboot paper; and a final group project.

FAIR 343U Adv Topics in Mind and Body: Embodied Futures

Credits: 4

Instructor: Nichols

Modality: Face-to-Face with class occurring outdoors

Theme: Embodied Futures

The world has changed dramatically and is changing dramatically. With the growing complexity of the world we need a radical new inquiry, a new worldview, perhaps even a different conception of self. Through an in depth 10 week course we will look through the cross pollination of interdisciplinary studies that gives insight to this new world. It is at the edges of academic disciplines that innovations and discovery of new understanding occur. The ground that gives continuity to this course will be the body, but more specifically the growing field of somatics. Soma is Greek for the "lived experience" or the interdisciplinary investigation of life lived from the inside out. Embodied Futures will investigate the edges of interwoven relationships between our self, our communities, our world and effects of media, technologies and science. The multitude of disciplines will include, but are limited to; somatics, neuroscience, psychophysiology, philosophy, neurobiology, and biopsychosocial studies. Not only will this course be demanding on an academic level, but also core to this investigation will be personal experiential investigations. Understanding solution-based change will require that we ask essential questions about our "lived experience" and how we relate to the world. This class will explore how to support change, growth and development in behavior, in learning, and in our communities. The Soma is the interface of experience for the outer world and must be studied in relationship to exponential complexity. This is an unprecedented time in human history where we have more access to infinite forms of information/data/media and technological power. How are we changing our behavior with these new forces? Are these forces disembodying? How do we become synthesizers of seemingly disparate information to create new order, new patterns and learn to work in collaborative ways? We will be exploring alternative ways to facilitate learning, understanding, and empathy. This course is a radical re-orientation to learning and sharing learning to inspire a shift in ourselves and in our world. This is indeed an experimental course that will require each of us to take a new positioning in the learning experience. We will work in multimodal ways: lecture, cognitive, body centered, media, movement, art, left and right brain, and collaboratively.

Texts: Thomas Lewis et al, A General Theory of Love; Peter Hershock, Buddhism in the Public Sphere

Credit/Evaluation: Regular attendance and informed discussion. Weekly Journals . Demonstration of synthesized information through three collaborative group projects and finally a paper expressing one's learning. "The creative edge of truth begins to shift from knowledge to wisdom...[thus moving] on to the challenges of balance, perspective, sustainability and integration." Charles M. Johnston

FAIR 364 World Music and Culture Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Sehman

Modality: Remote-Synchronous

This course examines select music traditions of the world, along with their many surrounding cultural contexts. The study of specific musical styles and traits will be accompanied by an examination of how individuals and cultures make that music meaningful in their lives, including:

Music as a tool for individual and cultural identity; the process of musical composition and transmission; methods of teaching and learning; social status and roles of music makers; globalization, diaspora and their effect on music traditions; definitions of, and concepts around music in various cultures; specific functions of music in culture.

Music cultures studied will include


  • South Indian Carnatic classical music
  • Indian Bollywood film music

  • Javanese and Balinese gamelan

  • Indonesian puppet theatre (Wayang kulit)
  • West African Mande storytelling music
  • Shona mbira music of Zimbabwe

This course will also provide an overview of ethnomusicology, the academic field involving the study of music in culture. Topics will include: Standard research methods and goals; the ethics and power structures of ethnographic fieldwork; objectivity and subjectivity in the field; methods of documenting music.  All students are welcome to participate in this course; No experience with technical music making is required.  

Texts: 

Titon, Jeff Todd, editor. Worlds of Music. 6th ed., Schirmer Cengage, 2017.

Rice, Timothy. Ethnomusicology: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press, 2013.

Note also that listening to musical examples will be a crucial component of this course.

Requirements/Evaluation

-Students will be expected to complete all reading and listening assignments, and actively participate in class discussions.

-Students will create a listening journal, to facilitate class discussions around the music.

-There will be brief, weekly written responses associated with readings and listening examples.

-Students will complete a research project on a topic of their choosing.

FAIR 370I Introduction to Pro Tools

Credits: 4

Instructor: Wallace

Modality: Remote-Synchronous

Prerequisites: 270H (before or during) or permission of instructor

Intro to Pro Tools builds off of knowledge gained in the Intro to Audio course regarding the use of basic audio recording equipment, such as mixing consoles, compressors, equalizers, and other outboard processors. Students will take this knowledge and apply it to the digital realm while learning the specifics of recording audio and MIDI, editing, and mixing using Avid's Pro Tools software. Covered topics will include: importing and recording audio into Pro Tools, editing and manipulating performances, MIDI, the use of plug-ins, and an overview of mixing processes such as compression/limiting and equalization. Students will be expected to attend class regularly and demonstrate critical listening skills through critique of their classmates' work. Additionally, the Fairhaven Mixing Suite and Fairhaven Recording Studio, as well as the Miller Hall computer lab will be available for use all quarter and required for certain projects.

Texts: Reprinted materials.

Credit/Evaluation: Projects will be evaluated throughout the quarter by the instructor.

FAIR 370J Studio Recording

Credits: 4

Instructor: Fish

Modality: Hybrid (combination of remote work and in-person small groups)

Prerequisites: 370I or 370P

Studio Recording takes the concepts introduced in Intro to Audio and Intro to Pro Tools and allows the student to apply and practice them in a hands-on manner, with the goal of becoming familiar with and competent in the use of the equipment in the Champion St Studio. Students will complete at least three multi-track recording projects and will have the opportunity to work on other recording sessions as well. Through the students' work on these projects they will learn efficiency and speed in the techniques of tracking, overdubbing, and mixdown sessions. The recording projects will be evaluated by the instructor as well as the other students in the class. This course will also involve development of critical listening skills as well as the creative and imaginative expression possible in audio recording. Students will keep a detailed journal of their session work. This is a Pro Tools based course and enrolled students will gain access to the Fairhaven Studio, Mixing Suite, and Champion St Studios.

Texts: The Recording Engineer's handbook (3rd edition) by Owsinski

Credit/Evaluation: Each student must finish the assigned projects which will be critiqued by the instructor and peers based on sound quality, balance, clarity and realization. Overall evaluation will be made based on effort, participation and growth as an engineer.

FAIR 370K Advanced Studio Recording

Credits: 4

Instructor: Fish

Modality: Hybrid (combination of remote work and in-person small groups)

Prereq: FAIR 370J or 370H

This class will give students with advanced recording experience the opportunity to record and mix on an industry standard Pro Tools 12 HD system. Students will enhance their knowledge of Pro Tools and learn how to use this software in conjunction with a large-format analog mixing console. Topics such as drum sample replacement, audio quantization, convolution impulse responses, spectrum analysis, DSP processing and other advanced topics will be covered. Students will be expected to conduct at least three recording/mixing sessions throughout the quarter and prepare a final portfolio for in-class critique. Students will also learn how to properly configure Pro Tools HD hardware and software components, how to setup session templates and how to utilize each component of an HD/analog system. This is a Pro Tools based course and enrolled students will gain access to the Fairhaven Studio, Mixing Suite, and Champion St Studios.

Repeatable for up to 12 credits, but with instructor approval and only if open spaces are available after students who are not repeating the course have had a chance to register. S/U grading Texts: Reprinted materials.

FAIR 381G Topics in Literature: Baldwin & Morrison Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Tag

“Once I found myself on the other side of the ocean,” James Baldwin told the New York Times, “I could see where I came from very clearly, and I could see that I carried myself, which is my home, with me. You can never escape that. I am the grandson of a slave, and I am a writer. I must deal with both.” In her 1987 eulogy of James Baldwin, novelist Toni Morrison spoke to Baldwin directly: “You gave me a language to dwell in, a gift so perfect it seems my own invention. I have been thinking your spoken and written thoughts for so long I believed they were mine. I have been seeing the world through your eyes for so long, I believed that clear, clear view was my own.”

In this class we will explore the writings and lives of two of America’s greatest writers: James Baldwin (1924-1987) and Toni Morrison (1931-2019). Black, bold, brave, bristling, and beautiful, Baldwin and Morrison wrote with intense honesty and insights from the very heart of their own experiences and lives. In their stories and novels, they also created extraordinary worlds, characters, events, and possibilities that had never before existed, writing from the deep expanses of their imaginations. Baldwin is considered by many to be one of the finest essay writers in the history of this country. Morrison won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1993. Our collective work will be to read deeply and broadly, to wrestle with the social, cultural, personal, and racial issues these writers explore, to live inside the characters and places they imagine (as much as is possible), to write about our own personal responses, and to discuss with each other the challenging, illuminating, and provocative ideas that stir us up. This is not a class for the light-hearted. Expect to read a lot. What reading Baldwin and Morrison may do to us, though, is to change and challenge us at our very cores. Hope you will join us. There is no better time to read Baldwin and Morrison than now.

COURSEWORK: Reading Baldwin’s COLLECTED ESSAYS, GIOVANNI’S ROOM, and short stories; Morrison’s THE BLUEST EYE, BELOVED, and essays. Viewing two documentaries: I AM NOT YOUR NEGRO (Baldwin) and THE PIECES I AM (Morrison). Class discussions, weekly reflection essays, and a final project.

FAIR 393B Rights,Liberties,Justice in US Society and Individual 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Lopez

Modality: Remote-Synchronous

The past is never dead. It is not even past. (William Faulkner, Requiem for a Nun, Act I, Scene III) This five-credit interdisciplinary seminar engages students in the processes of critical and reflective thinking, reading and writing. It is a place to explore what these processes are, why they are valued, how they work, and where they fit into a Fairhaven education. This class is a Constitutional Law class. We will read the Federalist papers and the Magna Carta to understand the beginnings of our legal system. We will dissect the US Constitution and learn its structure, federal powers, individual liberty, Due Process and Equal Protection clauses, first amendment speech, religion, and privacy. In the process we will discuss contemporary issues and cases as they are informed by prior cases.

Required Texts: Constitutional Law: Principles and Policies, Fifth Edition. Erwin Chemerinsky. Selected Federalist Papers. Dover Thrift Editions 2001. Alexander Hamilton and James Madison. Other online materials are assigned.

Learning Objectives: -Students explore the foundation documents in the formation of the structure of government in the U.S. -Continue to practice and learn about case reading and case briefing -Expand knowledge of and practice legal research and writing, including APA citation -Explore themes of Rights, Liberties, & Justice historically and in the present time -Understand the connection between the Constitution of the US, case law, and ordinary life -Foster independent researchers and engaged learners -Continued familiarity with how courts use precedent -Practice oral presentations and public speaking -Strengthen critical and analytical skills

FAIR 397G Sex & Shame

Credits: 4

Instructor: Schwandt

Modality: Remote-Synchronous

Student taught class by Emily Ehlers.

This course will explore ways to break cycles of sexual shame and strategies for leading sexually healthy lives that embrace sex, sexuality, gender, bodies, pleasure, and desire. Emphasis will be placed on the nexus between shame liberation, LGBTQ+ issues, reproductive rights, gender equity, and sexual health. Using a seminar format, we will discuss readings and other course materials to explore how shame manifests itself around sex, then examine how that shame is intertwined and perpetuated within our history, laws, religion, media, education system, and society. We will explore methods for ending shame cycles in order to find liberation and affirmation.

Books, articles, podcasts, art and films will aid exploration of course topics. Peer to peer dialogue will ensure engagement and knowledge sharing. The course will include small projects that correspond with each week's topic. For the final project students will create a shame liberating project that addresses a topic we covered in the course. After presenting the project to the class, students will find ways to share their project with their community outside of class.

FAIR 403A Advanced Seminar Required Core

Credits: 4

Instructor: Delucio

Modality: Remote-Synchronous

Anne Treat, Spring 2007 Fairhaven College graduate, said: "There is no possible way I can give justice to the complexity of experiences, triumphs, pitfalls, and challenges of my academic career in the course of this paper. This artifact of self-reflection is simply a pause in the broader conversation of my academic journey, an invitation for me to mindfully articulate the ways those things I've studied, read, discussed and experienced over the past four years have informed and challenged my personal development, and how I've chosen to integrate and express that knowledge through the actions of my life."

This seminar is a wonderful opportunity to reflect on what you have been up to all these years of being educated--through writing, conversation, presentations, and listening to each other. You will read and discuss a book and other readings, co-facilitating at least one discussion; write and share a variety of short writing assignments, designed to help you complete your Summary and Evaluation, and provide a supportive community in which to summarize and critically reflect upon your Fairhaven (or Life) education. Each student will also present or teach something to the class from the heart of his or her educational experience. This course is one of our favorites to teach at Fairhaven because we learn so much about our students, and the many intriguing, complex, deep, creative and quirky ways there are to be human and to become educated. The class also illustrates the value of writing as a process of discovery, synthesis, and meaning. We will all do our best to help you express most clearly what your education has been about, and are honored to learn from your stories, your minds, your creativity, and your lives. The course will be as significant as you make it. Be honest. It is your life, your education, so let us understand what it has meant and what it really means to you now.

FAIR 414D Topics in Social Justice Education Society and Individual 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Calderon

Modality: Remote-Synchronous

This course explores key themes and ideas that have been developed within the area of study referenced as Critical Indigenous studies. Collectively, concepts of sovereignty, Indigenous self-determination, epistemology/ways of being, amongst others, are explored in relationship to the nation-state, citizenship, and empire. Some of the major contributions by Indigenous scholars we will cover include settler colonialism, Native feminisims, by scholars such as Jodi Byrd, Dolores Calderon, Glen Coulthard, Sarah Deer, David Gegeo, Daniel Justice, Audra Simpson, Leann Simpson, Linda Tuhiwai Smith, Kim TallBear, Margo Tamez, and Eve Tuck. Selected readings will be available on the course Canvas site.

Credit/Evaluation: Regular attendance, engaged/active participation in all class exercises, engagement in class discussion, strong evidence of reading, quality performance on assignments throughout the quarter, quality of writing.

FAIR 421H Writing Practicum Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Friedland

Modality: Remote-Synchronous

Pre-Requisite: At least one Creative Writing course

This writing workshop will focus on long projects (a collection of stories, poems, novella or novel) in progress. During each in-class session we will workshop a student's manuscript and offer line edits, revision suggestions, discussions, and additional reading recommendations. As part of your workshop you will be asked to give a presentation and a short reading of your manuscript in process, in turn you will offer your peers weekly feedback and close reading suggestions. At the end of the course you will provide a short reflection on your revision process and a plan for the completion of the project beyond the course. This practicum is designed for committed writers, who need peer support and time to proceed with a longstanding work. There will be some additional readings on form, process and revision practices as well as occasional guest lectures from published authors. Students have to be willing to read manuscripts of substantial length and make time for extended writing and revision of their own work. While the class ultimately does not require you to *finish* a manuscript, you will have to provide a comprehensive prospectus at the end of the quarter that details themes, additional readings, a timeline and writing constraints that will enable you to continue working in a committed manner on the proposed manuscript.

Evaluation: active participation during our in-class peer review sessions, timely submission of drafts and peer feedback, a synopsis, prospectus and reflection on your writing practice.

FAIR 422K Advanced Legal Writing Society and Individual 2

Credits: 6

Instructor: Anderson

Modality: Remote-Blended

Description: This course is the SENIOR year capstone for the Law, Diversity & Justice

Curriculum and assumes foundational knowledge of the legal system as well as legal research and writing. This course is specifically designed to prepare students for law or graduate school and will require a substantial amount of work to complete two major projects: (1) an appellate brief based on a question in front of the U.S. Supreme Court for which there is no answer, and (2) oral presentation of arguments in support of the brief to a panel of judges (known as a Moot Court). Though these projects may seem daunting at first, steady work will make them possible. One of the goals of this course is to provide an opportunity to develop project management skills, including planning, organization, documentation and time management.

Modality: Remote Blended or Hybrid (dependent on SafeStart plan)

Learning Objectives: 

  1. Review of basic legal concepts including: vocabulary, court structure and hierarchy, the importance of the judicial system in government, sources of law, the role of precedent, and statutory construction.
  2. Develop and practice legal research techniques
  3. Develop and practice legal communication skills, including written, oral and alternative communication methods
  4. Strengthen critical thinking skills with an emphasis on legal reasoning and synthesis
  5. Strengthen individual, partner and group project management skills such as planning, organization, documentation and time management.

Evaluation:

  1. Attendance at ALL synchronous class sessions.
  2. Read, view or listen to all assigned learning resources.
  3. Completion of ALL exercises, case briefs and projects.
  4. Active engagement in class activities in all formats (synchronous class, group projects and online discussions)
  5. Successful completion of the appellate brief in proper citation format.
  6. Successful oral argument in the Moot Court.
FAIR 440N Ethnoecology Science and Our Place on the Planet 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Tuxill

Modality: Remote-Synchronous

Ethnoecology is the study of conceptions of ecological relationships and the natural world held by different peoples and cultures. In this course we employ ethnoecology to explore the role of traditional ecological knowledge--also called indigenous or local knowledge--in maintaining and restoring healthy ecological relationships between communities and the environment. We begin by comparing local ways of knowing with western science, identifying the epistemological strengths and challenges of each. Using a case study approach, we then explore how ethnoecology is conceptualized, systematized, and helps guide the management of landscapes and biota by rural, indigenous, and folk communities in many different contexts worldwide. Students will examine how traditional ecological knowledge based on a profound and active engagement with place can lead to a rethinking of conventional approaches to environmental conservation and rural development.

Texts: SACRED ECOLOGY: TRADITIONAL ECOLOGICAL KNOWLEDGE AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT by F. Berkes; ZAPOTEC SCIENCE: FARMING AND FOOD IN THE NORTHERN SIERRA OF OAXACA by R.J. Gonzalez; and THE SHEPHERD'S LIFE: MODERN DISPATCHES FROM AN ANCIENT LANDSCAPE by J. Rebanks. Additional reading assignments on Canvas.

Credit/evaluation: Regular attendance and informed contribution to class discussions is the foundation of this course. Evaluation will be based on each student's grasp and understanding of the concepts and issues presented in the readings. Students also will: 1) prepare an oral presentation on a case study of traditional ecological knowledge and its application; and 2) complete a final take-home essay evaluation.

FAIR 471 Neoliberalism & Public School Society and Individual 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Pierce

Modality: Remote-Synchronous

Neoliberalism is an economic and social model of governance rooted in the idea that society is best organized under the rule of radical free markets. This course examines and charts the rise of neoliberal driven school reform in the U.S. Special focus will be given to how free market school reform models treat ongoing racial and economic injustice in the U.S. Case study examples of New Orleans, Chicago, and Washington DC will be used to analyze the results of corporate education governance. Both a theoretical and historical approach will be taken to evaluate the claims made by neoliberal education reform proponents for achieving racial and economic equity through public education. Students will also be asked to analyze and present reflection projects on the recent Washington State Charter School Initiative (Proposition 1240) as well as community responses such as the "opt out" movement.

Learning Outcomes: Define and understand the principal assumptions of neoliberal economic and social policy; Identify consequences of neoliberal education reform policies in major U.S. cities; Evaluate the claims of equity and justice made by proponents of neoliberal education reformers; Apply course knowledge to construct arguments for what a racially and economic just public education system should include

Credit and Evaluation: Participation in class discussion and regular attendance; Timely and thoughtful completion of course readings and writing assignments; quality of writing assignments that use evidence from course readings; quality of reflection projects; critical and respectful engagement in class

Required Texts: 1.) Naomi Kline, The Shock Doctrine. 2.) Kenneth Saltman, The Failure of Corporate School Reform. 3.) Pauline Lipman, The New Political Economy of Urban Education: Neoliberalism, Race, and the Right of the City