Courses

Fairhaven College Course Descriptions

Below you will find our current course descriptions.  Previous quarter course descriptions are also available by selecting the quarter and year you are searching for.  Electronic course descriptions are available back to winter 2009.  For information on days and times as well as location please visit Classfinder.  To register for these classes log into Web4U. Important information about registration including deadlines and fees can be found on the Registrar's Office page.  For any questions about these course descriptions or for assistance with registration please call the Fairhaven College Office at 360-650-6680. For information on Fairhaven College Wait List Policies click here.

Fairhaven College Core Requirements:

Classes determined to satisfy a Fairhaven Core requirement will be identified using the following icons: 

Required Core  Humanities and the Expressive Arts II
Science and Our Place on the Planet II Society and Individual II

Non-Fairhaven Students

Most Fairhaven classes open to all WWU students who meet the prerequisites in Phase II of registration.

FAIR 101A Intro Interdisciplinary Study

Credits: 1

Instructor: McClure

This class aims to introduce students to Fairhaven College resources, practices, processes and possibilities in their first quarter of enrollment in our program. Our class activities will include small group workshops, introductions to Fairhaven resources and people, community-based activities and individual advising. We will introduce the educational practices used at Fairhaven (Writing Portfolio; Transition Conference; Independent Study, Interdisciplinary Concentration, Narrative Evaluations...) and share the essentials you need to proceed toward your chosen major and take charge of your education.

Texts: There are no textbooks. Course materials provided in class and on Canvas.

Credit/Evaluation: This Fairhaven College Core Class is a graduation requirement. Award of credit will be based on documented attendance, participation and completion of assignments as indicated in the class syllabus. Bring your your curiosity, your questions and your active engagement. The learning outcomes for FAIR 101a include understanding resources, degree pathways, requirements and pedagogy that are the mission and practice at Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies.

FAIR 201A Critical & Reflective Inquiry

Credits: 5

Instructor: Helling

Civil Rights This class will take a good look at what "civil rights" are in a legal sense and whether relying on them can achieve equality in our country.

What is the reach and promise of the law in securing equality?

Are there inherent obstacles in pursuing a legal strategy? How might we best go about fashioning a society that includes everyone fully? We will study key civil rights cases involving a variety of communities, including looking at the concepts of race, gender, sexuality, and disabilities.

Criteria for evaluation: This is a seminar class that relies heavily on increasingly sophisticated discussions of privilege and law; thus, attendance is extremely important as concepts build on one another and class discussions cannot be replicated. You will not get credit if you miss more than three classes. Active participation in discussions informed by thoughtful reflection on the readings expected. Assignments include an educational autobiography, a visit to court, weekly reflection papers, and an oral presentation coupled with a ten-page research paper on a topic having to do with civil rights (in the broadest sense). Texts: The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander Class Manual prepared by instructor Any legal dictionary

FAIR 201A Critical & Reflective Inquiry

Credits: 5

Instructor: Simon

Ten years ago, “fake news” was a sarcastic self-reference used by purveyors of biting political satire and media criticism on a comedy channel. In 2016, “fake news” took on a new connotation: false stories disseminated to purposefully disinform the public for fun and profit, with social networks the medium, and the levers of national power the stakes. Political commentators tell us that we live in a “post-fact” reality – that verifiable facts are no longer relevant to those who seek power or to the public, and that journalists, long the safeguards of the free and accurate flow of information that is the life’s blood of democracy, are powerless to demand them.

What happened?

In this course, we’ll look the differences between legitimate persuasion, where facts and evidence are presented logically, and propaganda, in which communicators use sophisticated psychological techniques to manipulate viewers, readers, listeners, and scrollers into doing their bidding. We’ll learn to recognize, resist, defang, and debunk this type of message when we see it in any medium – and to communicate effectively ourselves, with writing practice that uses logic and evidence to get our own ideas across honestly, and with power. Consider it Defense Against the Dark Arts.

Texts:  We’ll read works of social psychology (Pratkanis and Aronson’s Age of Propaganda) and cultural criticism (Postman’s Amusing Ourselves to Death) that deal with propaganda and media issues; examine fictional information dystopias (for instance, Huxley’s Brave New World, Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four, Eggers’ The Circle) in which information is manipulated as means of social control; and apply what we learn to understanding today’s message-dense media environment. We’ll write in response to these texts, and to what they tell us about the messages we find in our real world – and in our virtual one.

Credit / Evaluation: Regular written responses to readings, two major papers (one an expository essay and the other a personal narrative), a writing plan, regular attendance, and significant contribution to in-class discussions.

FAIR 202A Core: Humanities/Express Arts

Credits: 5

Instructor: Brown

Miley, what's good? -Nicki Minaj "I consider myself to be black." -Rachel Dolezal If race is not biological, then what is it? Or, put another way, how does it come to be as both a conceptual, bodily, social, and intensely material construct? This course examines the ways in which performances express, historicize, codify, and contest race on stage, in the media, and in everyday life. We are living in a moment in which race - it's meanings, politics, and effects - is highly contested. From everyday actions and speech acts to dress, from hairstyle to music video, from Facebook account to staged play, performance has been a space in which the power to name, identify, claim or reject various racial constructions has been reworked throughout history. Performance plays a role both in constructing racialized bodies and in exposing the processes and politics of this construction. How does race get constructed? If race isn't biological, what role does the body play? How is it expressed and articulated by individuals, communities, and even institutions? How do notions of race change over time? In this way, performances in this class become a way to both understand and identify the construction and representation as well as active tactics of identification, resistance and reclamation.

Students will read creative and critical texts along with viewing film, installation, live performance, and still images that explore a range of racialization processes throughout the history of the United States. We will look at how specific artists have used performance to deal with race and its politics and experiences, such as the anxiety of Latinx "invasion" in West Side Story, the fraught representation of African imagery in Kendrick Lamar's Grammy performance, the reflection of contemporary Whiteness in Planet of the Apes, and the generational differences in "Indian-ness" portrayed in Aziz Ansari's Master of None. Students will have the opportunity to explore these tactics in crafting their own performances using a variety of media to explore themes of authenticity, appropriation, activism, and more in relation to their own experiences and observations. Texts: Appropriating Blackness: Performance and the Politics of Appropriation by E. Patrick Johnson, Performing Whiteness: Postmodern Re/Constructions in the Cinema by Gwendolyn Audrey Foster, Embodied Avatars by Uri McMillan

Credit/Evaluation: Regular attendance, active participation in all class exercises, engagement in class discussion, evidence of reading, quality of performance assignments throughout the quarter, quality of writing.

FAIR 203A Social Relationshp/Responsibil

Credits: 5

Instructor: Helling

This section will explore the process of social identity formation in the United States through the lens of modern social theory. The goal of the class is to explore multiple perspectives on the formation of the state, individual rights within society, equality as well as the roles and responsibilities of individuals within their respective communities. The focus of the class will concern itself with the roots and application of Western ideals of freedom and equity that arguably form the basis for the United States' liberal democracy. The seminar will outline the origins of the enlightenment and the basis for "natural" rights and freedoms in conjunction with the derived roles of society and government. We will then examine how the universalist ideals of the liberal enlightenment have implicitly or explicitly excluded those without property, people of color and women. We will also define what the "social compact" has meant in different periods of American history, and the relationship of various groups to this compact. Can liberal democracy really provide equal citizenship for workers, women and people of color? How have the movements of socialism, reconstruction, decolonization, ethnic identity and feminism tried to reformulate and transform the social order? Text: And We Are Not Saved by Derrick Bell Other Texts TBA Credit/Evaluation: Criteria for evaluation include informed and active engagement in class discussions; informative, relevant group presentation and a term project paper that illustrates a sound grasp of social theory and critical paradigms.

FAIR 203A Social Relationshp/Responsibil

Credits: 5

Instructor: Calderon

Critical Indigenous Studies

This course explores key themes and ideas that have been developed within the area of study referenced as Critical Indigenous studies. Collectively, concepts of sovereignty, Indigenous self-determination, epistemology/ways of being, amongst others, are explored in relationship to the nation-state, citizenship, and empire. Some of the major contributions by Indigenous scholars we will cover include settler colonialism, survivance, Native feminisims, by scholars such as Vine Deloria, Gerald Vizenor, Sarah Deer, Paula Gunn Allen, Jodi Byrd, Eve Tuck, Glen Coulthard, and Margo Tamez. Through this course, students will engage with Indigenous informed thinking that will be useful to consider current issues related to the environment, activism, education, and other issues impacting Indigenous communities. Texts will included selected readings from Gerald Vizenor's Manifest manners: Postindian Warriors of Survivance, Eve Tuck and Wayne Yang's article, Decolonization is not a metaphor, Glen Coulthard, Red Skins, White Masks, Sarah Deer's The Beginning and the End of Rape: Confronting Sexual Violence in Native America, Margo Tamez's The Texas-Mexico border wall and Ndé memory" in the book Beyond Walls and Cages: Prisons, Borders, and Global Crisis (2012), and other selected chapters and articles.

Credit/Evaluation: Regular attendance, engaged/active participation in all class exercises, engagement in class discussion, strong evidence of reading, quality performance assignments throughout the quarter, quality of writing.

FAIR 206A Core:Science/Our Plc on Planet

Credits: 5

Instructor: Bower

This class aims to use photography as a tool to advance our understanding of nature. We will work on advancing our photographic skills and to develop an understanding of how cameras work, but our main goal in the class will be to use the camera to learn about nature from a scientific perspective through individual and group photography and original scientific research projects. Examples might include conducting a photographic survey of moss species on Sehome Hill, using photography to analyze the distribution of tree species near rivers, or using photographs or video to study aggression in gulls at the beach.

Texts: John Cox: Digital Nature Photography and other readings to be assigned. Requirements: Regular attendance in class and on field trips, completion of two drafts of a 5 page scientific paper based on a group field project, written responses to reading, and a portfolio of photographs made during the course.

FAIR 210A World Issues

Credits: 5

Instructor: Schwandt

This class is crosslisted with a second section of FAIR 210A. Both classes will meet together. We are citizens of the world! As global citizens, what do we know and understand about global issues and ourselves in a world faced with complex issues, such as, growing economic disparities, fragile democracies, environmental degradation, wars and militarism, civil liberties, racial profiling, globalization? How do we become intelligently informed? What is our awareness of and participation in local and global efforts for positive social change?

This course explores the complex dynamics of our globalized world from a holistic, inter-disciplinary and cross-border perspective. Together we examine multiple world issues, such as global inequality and poverty, food security, human rights, water, energy, population growth, migration, cultural change and public health, and of our individual and community roles as agents of social change on local and global levels.

This course is connected to the World Issues Forum speaker series and will have a different format on each day. On Mondays, each section will meet with its professor (Schwandt, Ó Murchú, or Akinrinade) for discussions on that week's Forum topic. On Wednesdays both classes will attend the World Issues Forum.

FAIR 210A World Issues

Credits: 5

Instructor: Akinrinade

This class is crosslisted with a second section of FAIR 210A. Both classes will meet together. We are citizens of the world! As global citizens, what do we know and understand about global issues and ourselves in a world faced with complex issues, such as, growing economic disparities, fragile democracies, environmental degradation, wars and militarism, civil liberties, racial profiling, globalization? How do we become intelligently informed? What is our awareness of and participation in local and global efforts for positive social change?

This course explores the complex dynamics of our globalized world from a holistic, inter-disciplinary and cross-border perspective. Together we examine multiple world issues, such as global inequality and poverty, food security, human rights, water, energy, population growth, migration, cultural change and public health, and of our individual and community roles as agents of social change on local and global levels.

This course is connected to the World Issues Forum speaker series and will have a different format on each day. On Mondays, each section will meet with its professor (Schwandt, Ó Murchú, or Akinrinade) for discussions on that week's Forum topic. On Wednesdays both classes will attend the World Issues Forum.

FAIR 213B Top/PopCulture: SciFi Film

Credits: 4

Instructor: Takagi

In 1902, Georges Melies produced a short film called "A Trip to the Moon," which tells of a group of scientists who, using a cannon to launch their rocket ship, visit the moon and meet its local inhabitants. 107 years later, it is the extraterrestrials who come to visit and reside on earth, as captured in the film "District 9." Though separated by an entire century of technological advancements in filmmaking, including computerized images, special makeup, and sound (to name a few), these two films are quite similar. They are a part of the science fiction genre that involves "a situation that could not arise in the world we know, but which is hypothesized on the basis of some innovations in science or technology, or pseudo-science or pseudo-technology, whether human or extraterrestrial in origin." (Kingsley Amis, New Maps of Hell).

In this class, we will watch classic and new science films and learn the history of the science fiction genre (and how it differs from horror films), scholarly interpretations of science fiction movies and we will discover how these films reflect the anxieties fears, and concerns of American society at the time they were released. Beginning with the 1902 classic by Georges Melies, this class will also screen, "Destination Moon," "2001: A Space Odyssey," "Andromeda Strain," "Blade Runner," "Brother From Another Planet," "The Matrix" and "District 9." Required reading: Vivian Sobchack, Screening Space: The American Science Fiction Film Articles on Canvas Other requirements: 5 (4 pages) Short analyses of the films 1 (5-8 page) research paper on a film of your choice Help lead a discussion on one of the films Informed participation in class discussions Regular, punctual attendance

FAIR 243U Embodied Mindfulness

Credits: 4

Instructor: Nichols

In this class, we will learn various practices of embodied mindfulness and sensory awareness, and ask whether and how they can influence the development of empathy, health and individual wellbeing. We all face difficult experiences, a guaranteed part of being alive. In response, human beings have developed a range of methods to deal with crises and negative life events. Recent research--spanning disciplines as diverse as bio-behavioral medicine, the cognitive and affective neurosciences, physics and psychology--have investigated the potential benefits of practicing mindfulness, including stress reduction, alleviation of emotional suffering, and strengthening of the immune system. Mindfulness and body/mind intelligence increasingly are also being understood as important factors in the development of improved mental health. Our methods will include an experiential approach, using practices from both disciplines of mindfulness and sensory awareness. We also will examine stress reduction from a personal approach. "Mindfulness means maintaining a moment-by-moment awareness of our thoughts, feelings, bodily sensations, and surrounding environment.

Mindfulness also involves acceptance, meaning that we pay attention to our thoughts and feelings without judging them--without believing, for instance, that there's a "right" or "wrong" way to think or feel in a given moment. When we practice mindfulness, our thoughts tune into what we're sensing in the present moment rather than rehashing the past or imagining the future." --greatergood.berkeley.edu

"To stop your mind does not mean to stop the activities of the mind. It means your mind pervades your whole body." - Shunryu Suzuki, Zen

Texts:

Master Text: The Miracle of Mindfulness by Thich Nhat Hanh; Reclaiming Vitality and Presence: Sensory Awareness as a Practice for Life by Charlotte Selver, Tao Te Ching edited by Stephen Mitchell, and a range of published literature available through WWU via Canvas. 

Credit/Evaluation: Demonstration of learning will include consistent and regular attendance, in-class participation, and fulfillment of reading assignments. Answering reading questions for discussion and keeping a journal of personal observations regarding practices learned from the class. Two papers of at least 5 pages each, and one in-depth final project presentation.

FAIR 255Y Folk Music Experience

Credits: 2

Instructor: Bower

This course combines playing folk music with the study of the contexts in which folk music has evolved.  For this quarter, we will study music from the Queer community, including both historical artists (such as Ma Rainy), to artists who arose during the late 20th century (such as Cris Williamson and Ani DiFranco) to artists from the current music scene (such as Hurray for the Riff Raff and Julia Weldon). Students will be expected to participate in discussions on readings assigned during the first five weeks of the course.  Each student will be asked to introduce one song to the class that enriches our knowledge of folk music or the context within which folk music has been written and performed.  We will encourage the introduction of songs that come from music of the Queer community. Students will write a short research paper that forms the basis for their presentation on the song and its context.  Students will also be responsible for learning and practicing the songs that are presented to the class, including practice in small groups.  Students are encouraged to gain practice at playing one or more folk music instruments during the course, and are invited to join the course even if they are beginners at playing an instrument or if they prefer to just sing.

Texts: Texts will change from quarter to quarter.  For this course, texts have yet to be determined.  Credit/Evaluation:  Regular attendance and participation in our weekly sing, informed participation in class discussions, one short research paper and song presentation, and practicing music in a small group.

FAIR 270H Intro to Audio Recording

Credits: 4

Instructor: Sehman

Introduction to Audio explores the techniques, tools, and technology used in multi-track recording. From a beginner's perspective, this course follows the recording process starting with the tracking session, then the overdub session, and through the mix-down session. By examining the various pieces of the recording process students will learn the concepts and skills necessary to use studio equipment such as microphones (their characteristics and placement), mixing consoles (explained in detail), multi-track recorders (analog and digital), patch bays, signal and effect processors, headphone systems, and multi-track punching and bouncing. Each student is also expected to attend a weekly two-hour small group lab, held in the studio, giving the student a chance to experience multi-track recording in a hands-on manner. A detailed manual will be provided to each student so that each concept will be encountered first in an assigned reading, then in lab, and finally in the class meetings.

Texts: THE RECORDING ENGINEER'S HANDBOOK (3rd edition) by Owsinski and the Fairhaven Recording Studio Lab Manual. The lab manual text will be provided by the instructor and paid for with lab fees.

Credit/Evaluation: Students will be evaluated through a combination of participation, attendance (lab and lecture), research projects, and understanding gained from the material evaluated from a hands-on assessment. Additionally, students will be required to complete a creative project with the instructor in the studio as a final project.

FAIR 297M Mariachi Music/Perform&Culture

Credits: 2

Instructor: Miyake

Ever since its establishment as a centerpiece of Mexican popular culture in the first half of the 20th century, Mariachi music has acted both as a central expression of Mexican identity and also as one of the most widely recognized representations of Mexican people and culture for those outside of this community. Students in this class will explore this cultural and artistic movement through both academic engagement and hands-on experience in creating this music themselves. Class meetings will be split each week between one session in which we will discuss academic and popular texts on Mariachi music and culture as well as participating in discussions with guest speakers and performers, and one session in which class members will learn to perform Mariachi music in both individual and ensemble formats. No experience in performing Mariachi music is required for this class- all instruction and expected musical collaborations will be designed to fit the experience level of each individual student. Texts: TBA Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will take account of regular attendance, evidence of critical reading, engagement in class discussion and completion of assignments.

FAIR 297N Ethnogastronomy

Credits: 4

Instructor: Tuxill

This is a student-led course taught by Arlen Coiley under the supervision of John Tuxill. Ethnogastronomy is the study of how food, cuisine, and the culinary arts are shaped by cultural practices, histories,traditions, and ecology. Ethnogastronomy examines cuisine and food traditions as the product of human cultural diversity and the interaction between people and environments over time. It is primarily concerned with the basic foods of the people--the comfort foods that define a culture or cuisine--as opposed to the foods of kings and courts. The goal of this course is to gain an understanding of why and how particular foods and beverages are associated with particular cuisines and cultural contexts, and how culinary traditions are also shaped (and in some cases re-interpreted) in contemporary society. We will follow a comparative approach using the lens of ethnogastronomy to explore culinary traditions from around the world, including Mexico, the Caribbean, Italy, France, Denmark, Lebanon, Ethiopia and the Pacific Northwest. This culinary survey will be guided and shaped by guest lecturers as well as the primary course instructor.

We will also explore the contemporary US fine dining experience from an ethnogastronomic perspective. An underlying objectiveof this course will be to gain insights into why Americans view and experience food the ways we do today. This course will also have a practical component, where we explore ethnogastronomy by preparing and cooking dishes and meals ourselves, making use of the cooking supplies in the Fairhaven science lab. This course will meet twice a week, with each week's first class focused on background material and concepts, and the second on practice. Concept days will be discussion-based, drawing on readings, videos, and other multimedia. . Towards the end of each concept class, students will be divided into small groups. Each group assigned a recipe related to the material, and will have an opportunity to add to or adapt the recipe (with a rationale for the changes). On the subsequent practice day, groups will then work from their recipes to cook and prepare food, collectively creating a multi course meal. Sharing the results as a class will provide additional opportunities for discussion and analysis.

Learning Objectives:

1) To learn how food, cuisine, and the culinary arts are shaped by cultural practices, histories, traditions, and ecology; 2) To learn how food traditions evolve (and in some cases are reinterpreted) in the context of contemporary American and global society; 3) To strengthen critical reading, writing and analytical skills around the history and cultural diversity of cuisine and food traditions; 4) To build a foundation of practical culinary skills and knowledge related to food preparation and cooking.

Required Texts: Near A Thousand Tables by Felipe Hernandez-Armesto.

Additional assigned readings will be accessible via Canvas. Credit/Evaluation: Students will be expected to attend every class with no more than two excused absences. In class they will expected to engage in discussion, cite required readings and actively participate in cooking. The other requirements are a weekly class journal that includes the various recipes we will cook, a group project to serve a meal at the Fairhaven community lunch, and a final paper (5 pages) and presentation on an ethnogastronomy-related topic of their choice.

FAIR 297P Women in Agriculture

Credits: 4

Instructor: Tuxill

This is a student-led course taught by Kamea Black under the supervision of John Tuxill. Every woman has a farm woman in her family and most of us do not have to go very far to find that woman. ~ Jaon M. Jensen, "Recovering Her Story" Course Description:

When you picture a farmer, what do you see? Where are they? What do they farm? Are they young or old? Are they wearing overalls?

Hold onto that.

Now, what happens if you picture a farm girl?

If you type the above into google images one of the first things you will see is a young girl in cheeky denim shorts, on a John Deere tractor. She is not driving the tractor, or using it for any functional purpose, but she is using it.

What you don't see is me. Me, or any of the women who are choosing occupations within the male dominated industry of agriculture.

Why is that?

The United Nations Food Agency released an observation that if women were given equal access to land, education, technological tools, and markets as men, agricultural production would increase 20%. Potentially this could feed an additional 150 million people worldwide. It isn't that women aren't in the fields; in fact, women make up an average of 43% of the agricultural labor force in developing countries. But these aren't necessarily managed by women.

During this course students will look at the historical farm duties of women, the existing gender gap in agriculture and how it intersects with the growing prominence of woman farmers on a local as well as a national scale. Additionally, students will analyze cultural barriers to taking on a farmer identity, media representation of women, and inherent masculinity within agriculture. This will be achieved through readings, multimedia content, class speakers and personal stories from women in the industry.

Learning Objectives

-Evaluate data on agricultural demographics and economics in the US -Explore the complexity of a female experience within the agricultural industry -Critically analyze implicit masculinity within agriculture and its effect on all genders within the industry. -Understand challenges and resolutions specific to women in agriculture Required Texts -Sachs, Carolyn E., Mary Barbercheck, Kathy Brasier, Nancy Ellen Kiernan, and Anna Rachel Terman: The Rise of Women Farmers and Sustainable Agriculture. -Jones, Lu Anne: Mama Learned us to Work, Farm Women in the New South. -Additional materials on CANVAS Final Project:

Independently, students will explore a related topic of their choice.

In conjunction with a 3-5 page refection paper, students can pursue an agricultural experience, an interview, or creative project.

Alternatively, students can produce a 5-8 page research paper related to material presented in the class.

At the conclusion of the quarter students will give an 8-10 minute presentation on their final project. Course Polices -Attendance and participation is key to your success in this class. No more than two unexcused absences are permitted.

-All assignments must be turned in on time. No hand written assignments are accepted. -Each assignments must be original and follow the provided instructions to receive credit. -Extensions on deadlines must be requested prior to the due date. -Unless otherwise called upon by the group to retrieve information, in class cellphone usage is prohibited Credit and Evaluation

Students will be evaluated on attendance, participation in (and preparation for) in class discussion, timely completion of assignments, and their final project. Additionally, students are required to submit a narrative self-evaluation before receiving credit for this course. Participation & Attendance 40% Completion of Assignments 25% Final Project & Presentation 30%

FAIR 303A Core:Intrdisc Cncntrtn Sem

Credits: 5

Instructor: Brown

What questions do you want to explore in your Interdisciplinary Concentration? (Are you asking questions, for example, about inequalities, ecology, musical cultures, or performance?) Why are these questions important enough intellectually, politically, socially or professionally to form the basis for your Interdisciplinary Concentration? Your challenge in the Concentration Seminar is a two- or three-fold one. First, you must answer the question of why your concentration matters to your own satisfaction. Second, you want to communicate the reasons why your concentration's questions matter to the mythical "average reader" in your rationale. Third, you must identify the set of courses, independent study projects, internships, or other forms of experiential learning that allow you to explore your underlying questions about your subject in the rest of your time at Fairhaven College. In practical terms, the seminar is designed to assist you with your development and writing of an interdisciplinary concentration. It will serve as a forum for discussion, guidance, and support during the proposal writing process. You will work collaboratively with your seminar, your instructor, and your concentration committee, to write your learning proposal and identify relevant courses and experiences to help you achieve your educational goals. Here are some of the practical questions this seminar will help to address: - What are the appropriate guidelines and requirements involved? - What exactly is it you want to achieve in your degree? - How can your intentions be given effective shape and form? - Who should be on your committee? - How do the parts of your concentration work together conceptually? - What are the best vehicles for your learning? - What should you put in and what should you leave out of your concentration? Text: Handbook on Canvas + Occasional Readings distributed in class Credit/Evaluation: Faithful preparation for and attendance at seminar; Steady work on your proposal; Contributions to the development of your group members' proposals. Credit for the course is granted when your completed committee-approved proposal has been filed with the Fairhaven Records Office and a regular self-evaluation form is submitted to the instructor.

FAIR 305A Writing & Transition Conferenc

Credits: 3

Instructor: Schwandt

The Writing Portfolio and Transition Conference are Core graduation requirements for all Fairhaven College students. Your Writing Portfolio will be a selective collection of your academic writing and an introductory statement of self-assessment about your writing at this point in your education. It will be reviewed and assessed by your Fairhaven faculty advisor. Your Transition Conference is a constructive mid-point conversation with advising resource people you invite to share your educational plans and collect advice officially moving you from the "Exploratory" stage of Fairhaven's program into the "Concentrated" stage of your educational plans, regardless of your choice of major. You should embark on these requirements when you and your faculty advisor agree you're ready for them. This is not a class, however you must attend one orientation meeting early in the quarter. Details about the orientation meeting schedule will be sent to all enrolled students via email and posted on the FAIR 305a class CANVAS site.

In order to receive credit for FAIR305a you must: 1) Submit your Writing Portfolio prepared according to specifications to be provided at our orientation and on our class Canvas site. 2) Schedule and conduct a Transition Conference which includes writing and circulating a Transition Conference Statement to your invited participants prior to the conference. Additional details and instructions will be provided at our orientation and on our class Canvas site.

FAIR 311B The American Legal System

Credits: 5

Instructor: Helling

Race in Higher Education Admissions An in-depth look at the American legal system and how it affects individuals and society, with coverage of legal vocabulary, sources of law, the structure of the government, the Supreme Court and the judicial system. The structure and evolving nature of the legal system, legal reasoning and the role of courts in government. Case analysis skills will be stressed, including identifying the issue, procedural history, facts, reasoning and holding of each case.

This class is required for the Law, Diversity and Justice concentration and minor. It should serve as a foundational course for anyone interested in learning about American law. Learning Objectives: Examination of the role and importance of the judicial system in government, including federal, state and tribal legal systems, with an emphasis on the U.S. Supreme Court Critical thinking skills stressed, including an analysis of how systemic inequalities may be replicated by the existing legal systems Introduction to common law and the doctrine of stare decisis by following a line of precedent on a specific theme Introduction to writing case briefs with an ability to identify procedural history, issue(s), analysis, holding(s) and dicta Introduction to civil law and criminal law Basic legal vocabulary Introduction to legal database Lexis/Nexus Public presentation skills Texts: Class Manual of case readings prepared by Instructor Law 101 (3d edition) by Jay M. Feinman Additional text to be determined Any legal dictionary (Barron's is recommended) Credit and Evaluation: No more than THREE absences will be allowed if you want credit for this class. Active and informed class participation will be expected. Assignments will include oral presentations on Supreme Court Justices, weekly case briefs and worksheets, an 8-10 page research paper.

FAIR 314E Critical Pedagogy

Credits: 4

Instructor: Pierce

Introduction to Concepts in Educational Equity. In this course we will draw from empirical research to examine the social, political, economic, and historical context of schooling for students of color in U.S. K-12 and higher educational systems. Students will be introduced to a set of ethnic studies concepts and theories from which to better understand the educational experiences and realities of historically underrepresented students. The course will also challenge students to reflect on their educational experiences and the schooling conditions of students of color in general, and to apply the concepts introduced in class to their own educational sexperiences.

More specifically, the course is intended to enable students to: 1.Develop an understanding of the histories, concepts, perspectives, and theories used to examine the complex realities of historically underrepresented students; 2.Articulate their understanding of concepts such as privilege, microagressions, institutional racism, whiteness, resistance, decolonization, and activism, and apply these concepts to their personal educational experiences and to the debate over educational (under)achievement, (in)equity, and the politics of education; 3.Engage in inter-ethnic/racial dialogues about race and racism, the use of power and privilege to institutionalize inequity, methods for achieving social and educational change. Texts: The main text for the course will include Is Everyone Really Equal? An Introduction to Key Concepts in Social Justice Education by Ozlem Sensoy and Robin DiAngelo, with accompanying blogs and media sources.

Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will take account of regular attendance, evidence of critical reading, engagement in class discussion, and completion of assignments.

FAIR 323H Elements of Style II

Credits: 1

Instructor: Tag

Grammar is a piano I play by ear, since I seem to have been out of school the year the rules were mentioned. All I know about grammar is its infinite power. To shift the structure of a sentence alters the meaning of that sentence, as definitely and inflexibly as the position of a camera alters the meaning of the object photographed. Many people know about camera angles now, but not so many know about sentences. The arrangement of words matters, and the arrangement you want can be found in the picture in your mind. -- Joan Didion

If you are interested in exercising your sentence-writing muscles, this is the class for you. Why is it that this particular sentence is arranged as it is? Or that the words you are now reading fall into patterns just so? This is a class about sentences: how they work, where they come from, what they do, how to write them. We will explore anything about sentences we can possibly imagine. We will write short, bold sentences. We will write long sentences, sentences that unfold slowly, adding detail after detail, until somewhere in the heart of it all a kind of luminous sense of meaning emerges, as if these long sentences themselves were able to transport us to the very essence of understanding. Hopefully, everyone who takes this class will come out of it confident and experienced at writing a wide range of sentences: simple, complex, pointed, lyrical, playful, clear, sexy, honest, intellectual, delicious, precise. The class will be challenging. Be prepared to train like a runner for a marathon, like a gymnast for a difficult vault, like a curler for a well-thrown stone. Sentences matter. I hope you will join us and discover what pleasures there are in writing, imagining, studying, and exploring the fascinating lives of sentences.

Text: ARTFUL SENTENCES: SYNTAX AS STYLE by Tufte

Credit / Evaluation: Faithful attendance. Active participation in all in-class writing exercises and discussions. Quality and completion of weekly writing assignments. Presentation of a final Sentence Extravaganza.

FAIR 330E Ethnobotany

Credits: 5

Instructor: Tuxill

For thousands of years plants have provided humankind with food, medicine, fuel, shelter, and inspiration. This course concerns the science of ethnobotany--the study of interactions between people and plants. We will examine the historical geography of plant use by human societies worldwide, and the many ways that botanical resources continue to contribute to our well being today. Ethnobotanical perspectives on conservation, grassroots development, environmental education, and sustainable living also will be highlighted. During the course we will gain practical skills for identifying and utilizing the Pacific Northwest flora, and put our skills to work on an applied research project. Texts: Jim Pojar and Andy MacKinnon, PLANTS OF THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST COAST; Ronald J. Taylor, NORTHWEST WEEDS; Brian Capon, BOTANY FOR GARDENERS. Other required readings will consist of journal articles, book chapters, and essays made available electronically. Credit/Evaluation: As part of the course, students will be expected to: 1) Prepare a collection of at least 20 plant specimens, including identification and documentation of uses for each plant collected. 2) Research and write a case study of ethnobotanical knowledge and its practical applications, based on either an in-depth interview or library research. 3) Give a concise class presentation about an ethnobotanically significant plant. 4) Contribute to a collaborative class field project in the Outback gardens. Regular class attendance and informed contribution to discussions is essential. Students also will be evaluated on their grasp and understanding of the themes and issues presented in the readings, including the foundations of plant identification and the ethical aspects of ethnobotanical research and plant use.

FAIR 334K Human Trafficking & Smuggling

Credits: 4

Instructor: Akinrinade

This course is an interdisciplinary examination of the various manifestations of human trafficking and human smuggling: human trafficking, bonded labor, forced labor, worst forms of child labor, organ trafficking, prostitution and sexual slavery. It examines the rise and growth of these issues, as well as the social, political, economic, and legal consequences for peoples around the world. The course also examines the challenges of addressing human trafficking and human smuggling, and the appropriate policy responses to the problem by governments, civil society, businesses, the international community, and individual actors. TEXT: Louis Shelley, Human Trafficking: A Global Perspective (2010) Class Requirements/Credit/Evaluation: Conducted in the seminar format, all students are required to attend class, prepared and on time, and participate actively. The final grade will take account of regular attendance, evidence of critical reading, active engagement in class discussion, assignments and class presentations as well as a campus education campaign that will ground the final reflection paper for the course. Regular unexcused absences will NEGATIVELY affect a student's evaluation. THERE WILL BE NO COURSE CREDIT FOR ANYONE WHO MISSES THREE (3) CLASSES IN THE QUARTER.

FAIR 334Q Science/Music of Natrl Sounds

Credits: 5

Instructor: Bower

Murray Schafer, a Canadian composer, coined the word "soundscape" to describe all the sounds that reach the ear from a particular environment. His book by the same name broke new ground in thinking about soundscapes, and in particular about how soundscapes have evolved and changed with the rise of humans as a dominant species. Through student-led seminars, we will consider Schafer's ideas including such topics as the physics of sound and how sound travels through the environment, how and why animals produce sound, the relationship between natural sounds and music, the history of sound, sound pollution, and whether society should consciously chose the sounds we are exposed to. In the field, we will explore Bellingham area soundscapes, recording sound from natural environments (wind, rain, birds, frogs, and other environmental sounds) and human influenced environments (farms, trains, marina sounds, downtown sounds, etc.). In the lab, students will use digital software to create a digital "soundscape" for inclusion in a class CD. No previous recording or digital editing experience is required. Texts: THE SOUNDSCAPE by Murray Schafer and other readings as assigned. Credits/Evaluation: Regular attendance, participation in recording field trips, completion of the "soundscape" audio project, leading classroom discussions and informed participation in other student-led discussions, written responses to the reading, and one major research presentation.

FAIR 335M Nutrition and Public Health

Credits: 5

Instructor: Schwandt

In the first phase of this course we will cover the biology of nutrition and work as a learning community to answer the following questions: What happens inside our bodies when we eat food? How do our bodies break down food and use the nutrients from the food we eat for energy and growth? What types of nutrients do we need? Why does this differ by country/culture? How much of each nutrient do we need? Where does each essential vitamin and mineral come from? Why do our bodies need essential vitamins and minerals? Can vitamin or mineral supplements meet our nutritional needs as well as the naturally occurring forms? In the second phase of the course we will build on our understanding of nutrition and discuss various types of malnutrition, such as: starvation, eating disorders, and obesity; as well as a variety of metabolic disorders and food allergies. In this class we will always include a discussion on the impact of diet on health with every topic covered. We will also explore inequities in nutrition - why they might exist and what types of programs have been piloted to address the inequities. Required Texts: Nina Planck, Real Food: What to Eat and Why (Bloomsbury, USA, New York, 2006) Walter C. Willett, Eat, Drink, and Be Healthy (Free Press, USA, New York, 2001) Carol Ann Rinzler, Nutrition for Dummies (Wiley Publishing, Inc., New Jersey, 2011) Credit/Evaluation: Students will be evaluated on their attendance, preparation for - via reading reflections, and participation in course discussions. Each student will choose a diet to research and will provide a snack that follows the diet for the class. On the day the student brings the snack the student will also give a short presentation on the diet. Students will also work in small groups on a nutrition service learning project with a local or international community. Assignments related to the group service learning projects include a group project proposal (400 words), final paper (1000 words), and presentation (20 minutes). Finally, each student will work independently on a nutrition research presentation and two drafts of a research paper (2000 words).

FAIR 336B Radical Feminist Imaginations

Credits: 5

Instructor: Spira

Radical Feminist Political Imaginations of the Neoliberal Turn

Characterized by a clamping down of revolutionary social movements both within and beyond US borders, the 1980s are generally understood as a period of great political and cultural backlash. Indeed, during this time, marginalized communities were overwhelmingly subject to worsening conditions, including a draconian rise in incarceration and a gutting of the public sector, alongside the outright repression of struggles for national liberation, de-colonization and Black power across the Americas. And yet, perhaps paradoxically, this period also witnessed a burgeoning explosion of vibrant feminist political organizing and cultural production - and particularly among anti-racist, queer, indigenous, women of color, working class and Third World feminisms. This interdisciplinary course examines social theory and historiographies, alongside the works of radical feminist activists and writers of the era to explore this powerful cultural-political force that came to the fore in a period that might otherwise be classified as one of revolution's disillusionment and despair. Emphasizing the projects of radical feminists (including Gloria Anzaldúa, Audre Lorde, June Jordan, Gayl Jones, Pat Parker and Dorothy Allison) we will work to tease out the collective visions of transformation engendered through the "radical feminist imagination." Together we will ask: How do these writers turn to, and re-invent, the genre of personal narrative to creatively express and challenge the complex workings of power in their historical juncture? Which "radical" feminists and movements do we remember and who has been forgotten? And, what might a re-consideration of this vibrant moment offer for movement building strategies and praxis today? Texts: Authors we will read include: Jacquie Alexander, Gloria Anzaldúa, Kristin Bumiller, Suheir Hammad, Grace Kyungwon Hong, Gayl Jones, June Jordan, Audre Lorde, Cherre Moraga, Pat Parker and Chela Sandoval. Requirements / Evaluation: This course requires close readings and deep engagement with course materials, as well as active participation in building class discussion and community. Assignments include frequent short response papers, class facilitation, constructive peer-review and an original final essay.

FAIR 336B Race,Racism&BlackResistance

Credits: 4

Instructor: Takagi

The Black women, similarly dressed in fitted bodices and flowing skirts, dance in a tight formation, moving their arms, hands and hips. A single voice calls out and is responded to by the group as they move their bodies to the distinct constant rhythm. They rarely look out to the audience or cameras as they keep their eyes focused on their bodies and each other. It is an impressive show of African American song and movement indicating Black empowerment that defies traditional Euro-American standards of music and aesthetics. 

The crowd of Black women and men fill the space holding signs and chanting for justice. Facing them are white police and bystanders with faces blank with a lack of empathy or distorted by anger and hatred. One of the leaders steps forward and demands to be acknowledged. A white undercover cop suddenly blocks the Black leader’s path, punches him and then arrests him as he lays on the ground.

The above descriptions could be describing Beyonce’s “Formation” video and a Black Lives Matter rally.  Instead, it is about the McIntosh County Shouters from the Georgia coast who, today, continue the tradition of “ring shouts” from the days of slavery, and a description of William Monroe Trotter who led a protest at the opening of “Birth of Nation” in 1915, Boston. The point is Black American protest against and resistance to being racialized and racially oppressed has a long history; it started about 400 years ago.

Using a theoretical and historical framework, this class will explore how the meaning of race and racism has changed over the years and the various movements of Black resistance that has emerged, which draws on African cultural forms, Christianity and Islam, anti-colonial politics, and utilizes strategies of protest that include songs, sit-ins and social media. Topics include slave rebellions, social construction of race, post-racialism, Jim Crow, Freedom Riders, Mahalia Jackson, Black Christianity, the Nation of Islam, Black Panthers, Elaine Brown, intersectionality, Trayvon Martin, Beyoncé, Black Lives Matter, the NJ4 and more.

Requirements:

All readings will be available on Canvas or websites.

Completion of readings prior to class discussions is required.

Three short (2-3 pages) critical responses to the reading.

One research project that critically analyzes a particular protest movement/action, activist strategy, influence of the arts (visual, aural, performance) on activism.

Presentation of project (10-20 minutes) in class.

 

FAIR 336M Non-Western Music

Credits: 4

Instructor: Sehman

This course examines various non-Western music traditions, along with their many surrounding cultural contexts. The study of specific musical styles and traits will be accompanied by an examination of its use in society, the role of the performer, performance settings, and other similar topics. The course will focus on various traditional and popular musics of India, Africa, Indonesia, and the Middle East. Special focus will be given to ways of thinking about music that fall outside of the standard conceptions of Western music. This includes West African concepts of time in music, which are often cyclical rather than linear, or the Indian raga, which is an abstract concept with no Western analog that defines many fundamental aspects about how a song is performed. Specific topics will include *Indian Bollywood film music *Indonesian puppet theatre (Wayang kulit) *West African storytelling music of the Griot This course will also examine basic concepts surrounding ethnomusicology: the academic field involving the study of music in its cultural context. What are some common ethnographic methods for studying a culture and their music? What are the implications of the roles of outsider and insider with regards to a music and its surrounding culture? Texts Worlds of Music, by Jeff Todd Titon The Study of Ethnomusicology: Thirty-one Issues and Concepts, by Bruno Nettl (Optional) Requirements/Evaluation Students will be expected to complete all reading and listening, and actively participate in class discussions. Each student will present a reading/listening and lead class discussion at least once during the quarter. There will also be short writing assignments based on reading and listening assignments.

FAIR 336M DIY Music Business

Credits: 4

Instructor: Sehman

The music business has undergone staggering changes in recent years. Funding, production, promotion and distribution have become largely the artist's responsibility. While this has democratized music making in exciting ways, it has also placed new responsibilities on the musician.

This course will begin with an examination of the traditional aspects of the music business, such as copyright, royalties, distribution, licensing, publishing and record contracts. We will follow that with an extensive study of the new DIY music business. We will look at the practical methods required by today's musician, including engaging with listeners, creating an effective online presence, self-promotion, and successful methods for releasing music (i.e. singles/EPs/LPs; physical vs. digital media formats). We will also examine the complex social and artistic issues that are a result of the changes in the music business, such as the value society places on music and musicians in the digital age, and the strain placed on the creative process as a result of self-production and promotion. Throughout the quarter, we will perform case studies of current artists, analyzing successful, notable and creative techniques currently being used in the music business. Requirements/Evaluation: Students will be expected to complete weekly readings, viewings and writing assignments, and actively participate in class discussions that arise from them. Each student will also be asked to lead discussion at least once during the quarter. All students are welcome to participate in this course, whether you are an active musician or are simply interested in the state of the current music business.

FAIR 336N Emotional Intelligence

Credits: 4

This course explores the origin and purpose of emotions through research and insights of philosophers, scientists and psychologists.

Emotional intelligence (EI) is defined as the ability to perceive and understand our own and other's emotions and use emotional information to guide thinking and behavior to achieve one's goals. But are emotions an intelligence? An ability? A personality trait? Where do emotions originate? For centuries the heart was considered the seat of the emotions. Recently, scientific research from neurocardiology and neuroscience has been correlated to illuminate the biochemical mechanisms by which the heart communicates with the brain and influences perceptions and emotions. We learn from science how emotion is communicated. What happens when a society does not acknowledge the importance of emotions or teach skills related to the perception and management of emotions? Personal costs of emotional intelligence deficits are attributed to relationship issues, health concerns, and failure to succeed in life. Drop-out rates, depression, mental disorders, aggressiveness, and violent crime may be aggravated by EI challenges. We pursue questions such as: How can the development of EI be used to resolve social issues? What ways have traditional societies developed to care for emotional health of self and community? For a different perspective we examine the Dalai Lama's philosophy on emotions. For personal relevance, students take an EI inventory and experiment with ways to increase their perception of and response to emotions including a neural feedback process that helps attain an emotional state of brain/body coherence that reduces stress and supports optimal performance.

Texts: Communicating for Life, Robert Bystrom, 2nd edition, and selected readings from resources such as Emotional Intelligence: Why it can matter more than IQ and Destructive Emotions: A Scientific Dialogue with the Dalai Lama, Molecules of Emotions (Candace Pert) and others.

Credit/Evaluation: Reliable attendance and active involvement are key components of this course. Students will be asked to complete the following >written responses to assigned reading >a presentation that reviews an aspect of emotional intelligence, discusses related research, or other approved topic >take an EI inventory and write a confidential review of their emotional intelligence strengths and challenges >maintain a journal documenting observations and experiences related to emotional intelligence

FAIR 336N Topics in Science: Wild Foods

Credits: 4

Instructor: Hahn

For thousands of years the First Nations of the northwest, including the Coast Salish, ate via a "seasonal round" from the bountiful shellfish, salmon, camas, berries, seaweed, and greens they foraged and traded throughout this area. What were these foods? Where did they grow? How did they contribute to the culture and ecology of the area, as well as human health? How were they managed for sustainability? What ethics did people apply to gathering, processing and eating food? In this course we will explore and study northwest wild foods across time, cultures, and ecosystems within a 100-mile range of Bellingham, Washington. Our study area will encompass the Salish Sea to the Cascade mountain crest. We will learn to identify, sustainably forage, process and prepare wild foods with a modern twist, via readings, field trips, guest speakers, hands-on projects and presentations, research, and the preparation of a feast celebrating the foods we have studied. We will also look at native food culture against the backdrop of European settlement and farming. How did two cultures--Indigenous and European--interface and impact one another? What factors have contributed to the loss of Indigenous food wisdom over the last 150 years? Today, many wild foods are also threatened due to the introduction of invasive species and loss of traditional ecological knowledge of how to use these foods. How can we imagine a modern food culture that incorporates sustainable wild foods? How might the traditional ecological knowledge of indigenous people apply to how we manage our "foodshed" today? Texts: Handouts, on-line papers, and the following texts: "THE EARTH'S BLANKET: Traditional Teachings for Sustainable Living by Nancy J. Turner, University of Washington Press; "PACIFIC FEAST: A Cook's Guide to Coastal Foraging and Cuisine" by Jennifer Hahn, Mountaineers/Skipstone Press, Fall 2010. FOOD PLANTS of COASTAL FIRST PEOPLES by Nancy J. Turner, UBC Press. Credit/Evaluation: Students are required to participate in class discussions and have regular class attendance; to participate in three field trips (two of these are 1-day trips on a weekend); to write 4-5 critical reading journal papers based on our readings/guest lectures; to complete two hands-on projects--A) a wild food harvesting/cooking project (eg., gathering /processing nettles for nettle pesto and sharing with class) and B) build and use a traditional pitfire for roasting root vegetables and salmon with the group; and to research and write a 10-15 page verbatim research papers on a wild food species; to present a "Final Project" based on the latter research (past projects include writing a children's book on nettles; creating wild harvesting songs for kids; designing an interactive computer model for state parks on wild food; designing seaweed ID/harvesting cards, etc) Details on assignments will be given in class.

FAIR 336V Arts as Therapy

Credits: 4

Many believe that the human species has an innate need for the act of creation through participation in artistic endeavors. History shows that the use of the arts in maintaining health and wellness is widespread. Many cultures required leaders to attain ability in the arts before assuming leadership. Most cultures use arts to bring communities together as a way of relating to challenges and supporting one another.

Arts therapies are based on the concept that people can benefit through use of imagination and creative expression. Most arts therapists share the belief that the arts have a natural capacity for healing and can provide personal insights about our body, emotions and thoughts. Arts therapies generally emphasize creative process above final product.

Some of the key questions we explore in this course are: What are the creative arts therapies? How do they engage the mind, body and spirit? How have these therapies evolved? What have they become in our current culture and where have they found effective use? How does one become certified in an arts therapy? What challenges do arts therapists experience? The course uses readings from readings, videos, class experiences and discussions, and presentations by certified arts therapists or counselors to guide our learning process. Course Learning Objectives >to explore various art therapies including music, visual arts, poetry, story, psychodrama, dance and integrated/expressive arts therapy >to examine the creative process and its relationship to health and wellness through personal experience and observations in others >to understand how peoples have developed and are using the arts to heal and gain essential personal insights for guidance

Course Requirements Fairhaven 202a or equivalent. No arts courses or skills are required. To gain greater understanding of arts as therapy, this course involves some experiential elements. Students taking this course should be comfortable and/or willing to explore their own creativity. This course is not designed to provide therapeutic interventions or to resolve personal issues. Additionally, the course does not provide a certification to practice arts therapies, but does offer information about how one becomes a certified practitioner. Required Texts The Creative Connection: Expressive Arts as Healing by Natalie Rogers, 1993 Expressive Therapies edited by Cathy A. Malchiodi, The Guildford Press, 2005 Additional article and journal readings will be provided electronically. Credit/Evaluation: Reliable attendance and active involvement are key requirements in this course. Students will be asked to complete the following demonstrations of learning: >complete all assigned readings >participate in class activities that include experiential demonstrations on arts therapies >write responses to readings and experiential class activities >research a specific arts therapy of interest and write a 4- to 5-page summary of findings >use the creative process as a means of demonstrating understanding of arts therapy in a course project to be shared in class.

FAIR 336V Art, Race and Resistance

Credits: 4

Instructor: Feodorov

In this combination art studio/seminar course we will investigate and respond to recent political and cultural developments that have left many people (within this country and beyond) feeling threatened, scapegoated, helpless and betrayed. In this upper division art course, we will discuss strategies for making art that addresses, analyzes and participates in resistance to these developments, not only as individuals, but within collaborative contexts as well. To this end, we will also explore topics such as colonialism, racism, exoticism, and globalization to gain an historical context for our art-making. Students will be responsible for 5 art projects, as well as keeping a journal of no less than 40 pages filled with sketches, notes, articles, etc, related to the theme of the course. Students will also participate in class discussions on readings, videos and evaluation of artworks. Credit and evaluation: Regular and punctual attendance is required. More than three absences will result in no credit being awarded. Students will be evaluated on their active and informed participation within group discussions, engagement with the material covered in class, and a demonstrated commitment to art projects, journal writing and note taking. S/U grading.

Required Text: Beautiful Trouble: A Toolbox for Revolution, by Andrew Boyd and Dave Oswald Mitchell, in addition to various required readings available on Canvas and online.

FAIR 336V VideoPerfomance&SoundArt

Credits: 4

Instructor: Feodorov

NOTE: Since this is not an intro class, students are expected to already possess some basic technical skills within their chosen medium. Please contact the instructor if you have any questions.

In the 20th century, modern artists attempted to both expand upon and destroy existing notions of what Art was or could be. Today, artists regularly use video, performance and sound to express and address ideas and experiences in ways that more traditional art forms can't. This course will provide students with opportunities to explore and develop ideas and skills in the areas of video, performance art and/or sound within the context of contemporary Art and society, culminating in public display, screening or intervention. Emphasis will be placed upon experimentation and developing of concepts in combination with existing skills. Students will initially present proposals and timelines to the instructor and give regular progress reports to the class. Experimentation and creative risk-taking is highly encouraged, however emphasis will also be placed on creation as a form of social engagement or comment. Collaboration among students is also encouraged.

Students are required to maintain a journal/sketchbook of ideas and notes of no less than 40 pages to be turned in at the end of the quarter. Each student will also give a short presentation on an artist working within their preferred medium and whose work they admire and why. Students are also expected to actively participate in class discussions, share their ideas with the class and comment upon each other's proposals and projects with honest yet constructive feedback. Students will also write short papers in response to assigned readings and artists presented in class. None, but required readings will be available on Canvas or online.

Credit will be based upon student commitment to their projects, regular and punctual attendance, active informed participation in class discussions, and timely completion of all assignments, projects and required readings. Students are expected to challenge themselves both creatively and intellectually. An open-mind is essential. S/U grading.

FAIR 336V Surviving as an Artist

Credits: 4

Instructor: Feodorov

So you've made the decision that you want to be an Artist, even despite everyone telling you that it is a hard life with little money, fraught with rejection, and that you won't be famous until you are dead and buried. Despite these warnings, you have decided to become an artist anyway. So, is there a secret to surviving as an artist? Are artists doomed to a life of latte-making in order to support their art? Are artists inherently leaches on society? Is the life of an artist only possible for the privileged? Whether you are a visual artist, dancer, musician, writer, or videographer, there is support out there for artists. In this course, we will breakdown some of the common myths surrounding being an artist and what that means. More importantly, we will spend the quarter investigating ways that artists support themselves through their work. We will cover how to build an artist resume, write a statement and bio, as well as how to document your work, use imaging software such as Photoshop, create a web presence, begin exhibiting and finding shows, networking, and numerous other strategies for beginning to think about art as a realistic career.

This course will utilize websites, required readings, guest speakers, field trips and class discussions. By the end of the quarter, each student will present a project to the class demonstrating what they have learned from their personal research in the form of an exhibition, website, portfolio, music release, or blog. This course is not about the making of art, but about strategies for getting your art out into the world and potentially being able to support yourself as an artist. Text: none Prereq: This course is for students already working at a sophisticated level with their art and medium, and who are seriously thinking about making a career with their art.

FAIR 336V Fabric of Cultural Activism

Credits: 4

Instructor: S'eiltin

The most innovative art of the past decade has been created outside conventional galleries and museums. Artists operating at the intersection of art and cultural activism have been developing new forms of collaboration with diverse audiences and communities. Their projects have addressed such issues as mass consumption and production and recycling practices in developed countries. Provocative, accessible, and engaging art is at the center and situates socially conscious projects historically, relates them to key issues in postcolonial art theory, and offers a unique critical framework for understanding them. Fabric (dress and fashion) will serve as metaphor for questions concerning mass production, distribution and consumption. Repurposing of corporate signage in developing countries, as well as many other topics relating to dress, culture and privilege will be explored, researched, discussed and realized in visual statements.

Assignments: Workshops in hand sewing techniques, pattern and garment construction and repurposing techniques will inspire the creation of four to five required projects. Presentations of artists who create dress and or adornment, or other art forms as social statements will be required of each student. Presentations must be 10 - 15 minutes long.

A sketchbook/journal is an essential tool in generating ideas; students are required to make numerous entries throughout the quarter. Students must come to class fully prepared to work on their projects. Supplies must be purchased in advance; sketches must represent thoughtful planning and the willingness to experiment.

Evaluation of student learning will be based on the following: student's ability to apply content of class to the creation of four or five projects, the completion of all assignments in a timely manner and the willingness and ability to imagine, problem solve, and take creative risks, and make positive contributions to the overall learning environment of the class. Consistent attendance is essential in this studio class as there will be many demonstrations and workshops that will enable students to make significant progress on their projects. More than three unexcused absences will result in 0 credits.

Required Texts: Margaret Maynard, Dress and Globalisation, Manchester University Press, NY, 2004 Livingstone, Ploof, ed., "The Object of Labor, Art, Cloth and Cultural Production", The MIT Press, 2007 Highly Recommended Text: Sandra Bardwell, "Sewing Basics, All you Need to Know About Machine and Hand Sewing" Stewart Tabori & Chang, NY Suggested Editors: Firat, Kuryel, Cultural Activism, Practices, Dilemmas, and Possibilities, Thamyris Intersecting No. 21, the Netherlands, 2011 Editors: Paulicelli, Clark, The Fabric of Cultures, Fashion, Identity and Globalization, Routledge, London and N.Y., 2009

FAIR 343U Embodied Leadership

Credits: 4

Instructor: Nichols

Description: Leadership skills are essential for people to meet the multiple challenges of shifting power structures, social complexity, and community needs. This class will clarify and define the new leadership movement, a defining element of which was described in Scientific American Mind (September 2007): "Power and charisma aren't enough. The best leaders guide groups from within." The embodiment of "guiding from within" is central to our course inquiry. We will define and explore the philosophy and skills that comprise leadership, including the topics of diversity training, social justice, compassion, empathy, social and emotional intelligence, understanding the well-being of the group, and complex problem-solving. Readings and discussion will provide opportunities to clarify and understand different conceptions of leadership; and experiential learning will enable us to gain a felt sense of embodied leadership in action. Through the body we will develop the acumen, sensitivity, and creativity to work with diverse group dynamics. Texts: Presence: An Exploration of Profound Change in People, Organizations, and Society by Peter Senge; Being Human at Work: Bringing Somatic Intelligence Into Your Professional Life by Richard Strozzi-Heckler; and additional readings made available via Canvas. Credit/Evaluation: Demonstration of learning will include consistent and regular attendance, in-class participation, and fulfillment of reading assignments. Three integration papers will track the student's intellectual understanding of embodied leadership. Each student also will design a leadership rubric for themselves and others; create a leadership project; and help share the process and results of their project with the greater Fairhaven community via Podcast, video, performance, and/or multimedia approaches.

FAIR 370I Introduction to Pro Tools

Credits: 2

Instructor: Fish

Prerequisites: 270H (before or during) or permission of instructor This class will introduce students to mixing and editing audio with Avid's Pro Tools 12 software. Covered topics will include: importing and recording audio into Pro Tools, editing and manipulating performances, MIDI, the use of plug-ins, and an overview of mixing processes such as compression/limiting, dithering and equalization. As this is primarily a mixing class, having already recorded material is useful but not required. Students will be expected to attend class regularly and demonstrate critical listening skills through critique of their classmates' work. Additionally, the Fairhaven Mixing Suite will be available for use all quarter and required for certain projects.

Texts: Reprinted materials.

Credit/Evaluation: Projects will be evaluated throughout the quarter by the instructor and the other members of the class.

FAIR 370J Studio Recording I

Credits: 4

Instructor: Fish

Prerequisites: 370I or 370P

Studio Recording I takes the concepts introduced in Intro to Audio and Intro to Pro Tools and allows the student to apply and practice them in a hands-on manner, with the goal of becoming familiar with and competent in the use of the equipment in the Fairhaven audio studios. Students will complete three multi-track recording projects and will have the opportunity to work on other recording sessions as well. Through the students' work on these projects they will learn efficiency and speed in the techniques of tracking, overdub, and mixdown sessions. The recording projects will be evaluated by the instructor as well as the other students in the class. This course also improves the development of critical listening skills as well as the creative and imaginative expression possible in audio recording. Students will keep a detailed journal of their session work. This is a Pro Tools based course.

Texts: THE RECORDING ENGINEER'S HANDBOOK (3rd edition) by Owsinski

Credit/Evaluation: Each student must finish the assigned projects which will be critiqued by the instructor and peers based on sound quality, balance, clarity and realization. Overall evaluation will be made based on effort, participation and growth as an engineer.

FAIR 370K Studio Recording II

Credits: 2

Instructor: Fish

Prereq: FAIR 370J or 370H

This class will give students with advanced recording experience the opportunity to record and mix on an industry standard Pro Tools 12 HD system. Students will enhance their knowledge of Pro Tools and learn how to use this software in conjunction with a large-format analog mixing console. Students will be expected to conduct at least two recording/mixing sessions throughout the quarter and prepare a final mix for in-class critique. Students will also learn how to properly configure Pro Tools HD hardware and software components, how to setup session templates and how to utilize each component of an HD/analog system. This class is repeatable up to 3 times. All Fairhaven audio studio facilities will be available to students for the duration of the quarter.

Texts: Reprinted materials.

Credit/Evaluation: Projects will be evaluated throughout the quarter by the instructor and the other members of the class.

FAIR 375S Business Plans/Social Entrepnr

Credits: 4

Instructor: Coulet du Gard

This course examines business plans for social entrepreneurship (small business and nonprofit structures), emphasizing socially responsible and sustainable systems. We will employ a cooperative learning experience. Have you ever dreamed of starting your own business or becoming part of a team to create a nonprofit organization? Have you ever wondered why so many small businesses and new nonprofits fail? This course is a practical course analyzing and applying step-by-step the major processes in creating a solid plan for social entrepreneurship success. Students interested in pursuing a career in the nonprofit world, creating their own nonprofit, or establishing a for-profit business will be required to create a business plan. Emphasis will be placed on US systems, although the course will also provide examples from international social entrepreneurship. Guest speakers will be brought in to discuss various aspects of business planning. S/U grading.

Texts: The Social Entrepreneur's Handbook. Rupert Scofield (2011) The Right -Brain Business Plan. Jennifer Lee (2011) Canvas articles, videos, links. Course Requirements: Attend each class (miss no more than three classes); a fourth miss may result in a "U" grade. Be prepared to discuss in an active manner the assigned readings every class. Participate in engaged individual and group exercises during class (mind-mapping, collage, writing, and more.) Be prepared with all written assignments and business plan component drafts in a professional format (typewritten & printed or in Canvas). Complete a business plan (minimum 10-12 pages) by the end of the quarter.

FAIR 399B Contemp American Indian Issues

Credits: 4

Instructor: Rowe

Explores American Indian perspectives of contemporary political, social, economic, and cultural issues in Indian/White relations. The issues we will examine include land claims, treaty rights, gaming, education, cultural appropriation, environmental racism and religious freedom. Our common reading will illuminate Indian prioritization and initiatives in Indian Country. We will use news media sources for late breaking issues. Students will write several short essays in response to readings or videos, an individual research paper and prepare a small group research and teaching project to present to the seminar. Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation for purposes of granting credit will be based on regular attendance, meaningful participation in discussions, completion of assignments, quality of writing, and effectiveness of group research and teaching project. Texts: Required: The Harvard Project on American Indian Development: THE STATE OF THE NATIVE NATIONS: CONDITIONS UNDER U.S. POLICIES OF SELF-DETERMINATION.

FAIR 403A Advanced Seminar

Credits: 4

Instructor: Tuxill

ANNE TREAT, Spring 2007 grad, said: "There is no possible way I can give justice to the complexity of experiences, triumphs, pitfalls and challenges of my academic career in the course of this paper. This artifact of self-reflection is simply a pause in the broader conversation of my academic journey, an invitation for me to mindfully articulate the ways those things I've studied, read, discussed and experienced over the past four years have informed and challenged my personal development, and how I've chosen to integrate and express that knowledge through the actions of my life" This seminar is a wonderful opportunity to reflect on what you have been up to all these years of being educated--through writing, conversation, presentations, and listening to each other. You will read and discuss a book and other readings, co-facilitating at least one discussion; write and share a variety of short writing assignments, designed to help you complete your Summary and Evaluation, and provide a supportive community in which to summarize and critically reflect upon your Fairhaven (or Life) education. Each student will also present or teach something to the class from the heart of his or her educational experience. This course is one of our favorites to teach at Fairhaven because we learn so much about our students, and the many intriguing, complex, deep, creative and quirky ways there are to be human and to become educated. The class also illustrates the value of writing as a process of discovery, synthesis and meaning. We will all do our best to help you express most clearly what your education has been about, and are honored to learn from your stories, your minds, your creativity, and your lives. The course will be as significant as you make it. Be honest. It is your life, your education, so let us understand what it has meant and what it really means to you now. Texts: varies by instructor Credit/Evaluation: Active, informed participation in class discussion and excellent class attendance; supportive collaboration with your classmates in the writing process; timely completion of assignments; a final presentation of significant aspects of your educational experience; and a final draft of your Summary and Evaluation, approved and signed by your concentration chair (or by your advisor for majors or upside-down students).

FAIR 403A Advanced Seminar

Credits: 4

Instructor: Tag

ANNE TREAT, Spring 2007 grad, said: "There is no possible way I can give justice to the complexity of experiences, triumphs, pitfalls and challenges of my academic career in the course of this paper. This artifact of self-reflection is simply a pause in the broader conversation of my academic journey, an invitation for me to mindfully articulate the ways those things I've studied, read, discussed and experienced over the past four years have informed and challenged my personal development, and how I've chosen to integrate and express that knowledge through the actions of my life" This seminar is a wonderful opportunity to reflect on what you have been up to all these years of being educated--through writing, conversation, presentations, and listening to each other. You will read and discuss a book and other readings, co-facilitating at least one discussion; write and share a variety of short writing assignments, designed to help you complete your Summary and Evaluation, and provide a supportive community in which to summarize and critically reflect upon your Fairhaven (or Life) education. Each student will also present or teach something to the class from the heart of his or her educational experience. This course is one of our favorites to teach at Fairhaven because we learn so much about our students, and the many intriguing, complex, deep, creative and quirky ways there are to be human and to become educated. The class also illustrates the value of writing as a process of discovery, synthesis and meaning. We will all do our best to help you express most clearly what your education has been about, and are honored to learn from your stories, your minds, your creativity, and your lives. The course will be as significant as you make it. Be honest. It is your life, your education, so let us understand what it has meant and what it really means to you now. Texts: varies by instructor Credit/Evaluation: Active, informed participation in class discussion and excellent class attendance; supportive collaboration with your classmates in the writing process; timely completion of assignments; a final presentation of significant aspects of your educational experience; and a final draft of your Summary and Evaluation, approved and signed by your concentration chair (or by your advisor for majors or upside-down students).

FAIR 403A Advanced Seminar

Credits: 4

Instructor: Rowe

ANNE TREAT, Spring 2007 grad, said: "There is no possible way I can give justice to the complexity of experiences, triumphs, pitfalls and challenges of my academic career in the course of this paper. This artifact of self-reflection is simply a pause in the broader conversation of my academic journey, an invitation for me to mindfully articulate the ways those things I've studied, read, discussed and experienced over the past four years have informed and challenged my personal development, and how I've chosen to integrate and express that knowledge through the actions of my life" This seminar is a wonderful opportunity to reflect on what you have been up to all these years of being educated--through writing, conversation, presentations, and listening to each other. You will read and discuss a book and other readings, co-facilitating at least one discussion; write and share a variety of short writing assignments, designed to help you complete your Summary and Evaluation, and provide a supportive community in which to summarize and critically reflect upon your Fairhaven (or Life) education. Each student will also present or teach something to the class from the heart of his or her educational experience. This course is one of our favorites to teach at Fairhaven because we learn so much about our students, and the many intriguing, complex, deep, creative and quirky ways there are to be human and to become educated. The class also illustrates the value of writing as a process of discovery, synthesis and meaning. We will all do our best to help you express most clearly what your education has been about, and are honored to learn from your stories, your minds, your creativity, and your lives. The course will be as significant as you make it. Be honest. It is your life, your education, so let us understand what it has meant and what it really means to you now. Texts: varies by instructor Credit/Evaluation: Active, informed participation in class discussion and excellent class attendance; supportive collaboration with your classmates in the writing process; timely completion of assignments; a final presentation of significant aspects of your educational experience; and a final draft of your Summary and Evaluation, approved and signed by your concentration chair (or by your advisor for majors or upside-down students).

FAIR 403A Advanced Seminar

Credits: 4

Instructor: S'eiltin

ANNE TREAT, Spring 2007 grad, said: "There is no possible way I can give justice to the complexity of experiences, triumphs, pitfalls and challenges of my academic career in the course of this paper. This artifact of self-reflection is simply a pause in the broader conversation of my academic journey, an invitation for me to mindfully articulate the ways those things I've studied, read, discussed and experienced over the past four years have informed and challenged my personal development, and how I've chosen to integrate and express that knowledge through the actions of my life" This seminar is a wonderful opportunity to reflect on what you have been up to all these years of being educated--through writing, conversation, presentations, and listening to each other. You will read and discuss a book and other readings, co-facilitating at least one discussion; write and share a variety of short writing assignments, designed to help you complete your Summary and Evaluation, and provide a supportive community in which to summarize and critically reflect upon your Fairhaven (or Life) education. Each student will also present or teach something to the class from the heart of his or her educational experience. This course is one of our favorites to teach at Fairhaven because we learn so much about our students, and the many intriguing, complex, deep, creative and quirky ways there are to be human and to become educated. The class also illustrates the value of writing as a process of discovery, synthesis and meaning. We will all do our best to help you express most clearly what your education has been about, and are honored to learn from your stories, your minds, your creativity, and your lives. The course will be as significant as you make it. Be honest. It is your life, your education, so let us understand what it has meant and what it really means to you now. Texts: varies by instructor Credit/Evaluation: Active, informed participation in class discussion and excellent class attendance; supportive collaboration with your classmates in the writing process; timely completion of assignments; a final presentation of significant aspects of your educational experience; and a final draft of your Summary and Evaluation, approved and signed by your concentration chair (or by your advisor for majors or upside-down students).

FAIR 412E Advanced Topics in Law

Credits: 4

Instructor: Lopez

Fair 412e Advanced Topics in the Law: Poverty Law Poverty Law: a Response to Socio-Economic Inequality - the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly. The gap between the rich and the poor continue to widen in the Unites States. Today, the most affected groups are racial and ethnic minorities, immigrant groups, single parent households and people with disabilities. Ever wonder why this gap exists amidst our anti-poverty programs? Are these programs effective, or are they perpetuating cycles of poverty? What are the traps that keep people in poverty? Is there a way out? This course provides an introduction to the relationship between law and poverty, including the relevance of legal doctrine, policy and practice to the significant inequality in income, assets and basic social goods impacting tens of millions of people in the United States. We will begin by considering historical and contemporary trends in domestic poverty, U.S. social welfare policy, the legal framework under which poverty-related claims have been adjudicated, and the role of lawyers in combatting poverty.

We will critique modern government anti-poverty programs and issues such as welfare, work, housing, health, education and criminalization by taking a systems approach to the issues of poverty.

Required Texts: Poverty Law, Policy and Practice by Juliet Brodie, et al; Thinking in Systems, by Donella H. Meadows; and class handouts.

Credit/Evaluation: Class participation and attendance at all class sessions. Unexcused absences may result in a U grade. Students are expected to come to class prepared to discuss assigned materials. All written assignments must be typed. We will write several reflective essays. There will be one final project or a 15-page research paper to be presented in class at the end of the quarter.

FAIR 413E Curers,Client,Culture:Hlth/Ill

Credits: 5

Instructor: Coulet du Gard

This course examines health belief systems in cross-cultural perspective, including the roles of practitioner and patient; explanation, diagnosis and treatment of disease; the impact of modernization on non-Western medical systems, and ethnicity and health care in the US.

We will examine healing methods as "ethnomedicine systems" including Western Biomedicine. Who are the curers, who are the clients? How can they be described and analyzed within a cultural context ? Are we all curers? What makes a healer powerful? We will also explore how colonization, sex, gender, ethnicity, age, religion, values, and more intersect to establish, create, and negate various healing modes and traditions within a given culture, and how systems are transposed or culturally appropriated in modern globalized society. Our exploration will include issues of the body/mind dichotomy of Western cultures and the implications that that has for "mental" illness and the Americanization of mental illness; the placebo/nocebo effect; and alternative healing methods (as complementary systems) within US culture. Guest lecturers are included for in-depth understanding of the roles of curer and client.

S/U grading. Text: Ethnomedicine by Pamela I Erickson (2008) Waveland Press. Dancing Skeletons. Life and Death in West Africa by Katherine A. Dettwyler (2014 edition) Readings in Canvas. Videos: Horse Boy; Placebo: Mind over Medicine; Shaman of the Andes; Sick Around the World.

Class Requirements: Attend each class (miss no more than three classes); a forth miss may result in "u" grade Be prepared to discuss the assigned readings every class. Be prepared with all written assignments, in a professional format (typewritten & printed or in Canvas) Write several reflective essays during the quarter. Experience a healing session or interview a healer and be able to write an essay based in that experience. Create a final project or write a 10 page research paper to be presented in class at the end of the quarter

FAIR 414D Topic Social Justice Education

Credits: 4

Instructor: Velez

Overview & Objective:

Critical Race Theory (CRT) was originally conceptualized in legal scholarship as discourse to expose racism as endemic to daily life in the United States. Since its inception it has expanded into the social sciences, humanities and education as a critique of the functions of race and racism in society. Utilizing an interdisciplinary approach, CRT centers the stories and experiences of People of Color as critical to any discussion of race. Although highly contested due to its contextual and methodological approaches, CRT scholars have attempted to create a space to engage in discourse and praxis to challenge "color-evasive/post-race" rhetoric and policy.

This course explores CRT as an epistemological, methodological, and pedagogical "entry point" to the study of race and racism in P-20 education. Incorporating legal, historical, policy analysis and sociological approaches, this class attempts to deepen a critical race analysis in the examination of educational concerns. Through the incorporation of various segments of critical theory (e.g. post-modern, post-structural, critical feminism, etc.) the class seeks to place CRT in the realm of education for social justice.

Student Learning Outcomes: Students will: 1.

 

Demonstrate a nuanced understanding of how racial inequities are produced, reproduced, and maintained within and connected to schools; 2.

 

Study the historical development of the major tenets of Critical Race Theory in education; 3.

 

Assess the explanatory potential of CRT to define conditions in schools and operate as a transformative tool for racial justice; 4.

 

Explore how educational policies and practices differentially impact students based on their structural location as People of Color in U.S. society; 5.

 

Apply CRT, particularly its intersections with other critical theories, to research and present on an area of interest connected to school policy and practice; 6.

 

Develop habits of critical reflection, analysis, and dialogue to understand issues from multiple perspectives and in their complexity. Selection of Course Texts: 1.

 

Taylor, E., Gillborn, D., & Ladson-Billings, G. (2015). Foundations of Critical Race Theory in Education (Second Edition). New York: Routledge. 2.

 

Bell, D. (2005). Silent Covenants: Brown v. Board of Education and the Unfulfilled Hopes for Racial Reform. Oxford: Oxford University Press. 3.

 

Delgado, R. & Stefancic, J. (2012). Critical Race Theory: An Introduction (Second Edition). New York: New York University Press. 4.

 

Stovall, D. O. (2016). Born Out of Struggle: Critical Race Theory, School Creation, and the Politics of Interruption. New York: SUNY Press. 5.

 

Mills, C. (1997). The Racial Contract. New York: Cornell University Press. 6.

 

Melamed, J. (2011). Represent and Destroy: Rationalizing Violence in the New Racial Capitalism. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. 7.

 

Bonilla-Silva, E. (2013). Racism without Racists: Color-blind Racism and the Persistence of Racial Inequality in America. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield

Publishers. 8.

 

Delgado, R. & Stefancic, J. (2013). Critical Race Theory: The Cutting Edge (Third Edition). Philadelphia: Temple University Press.

Credit/Evaluation:

Students will be graded/evaluated on the following requirements: 1) 25-30 page research paper on a CRT issue related to education due at the end of the term (40%); 2) a group/paired presentation on the course readings (40%), and 3) class attendance (20%).

 

FAIR 486E Singular Obsessions

Credits: 5

Instructor: Tag

Do you have a singular obsession, something that you want to work on, explore, or immerse yourself in with no promptings whatsoever from anyone else? Something you cannot stop thinking about? Something that sits on you? Something that compels you to follow its paths no matter what else stands in the way? Something you would rather be doing than reading this course description? This is an advanced level course in which we will study those who have had such singular obsessions, and explore one of our own singular obsessions as fully as we can in ten weeks. Some of the Singular Obsessors we explore may be like Emily Dickinson who wrote over 1,700 poems and stuffed them in drawers, or Aretha Franklin who devoted her life to singing, or Ra Paulette who spent more than 20 years hand-carving the inside of New Mexico caves into magical art forms, or Vivian Maier who took compelling street photographs in New York City, or Jimi Hendrix who lost himself in and transformed the electric guitar, or Peace Pilgrim who walked for 28 years for peace, or Maya Lin who designed the Vietnam Veteran's Memorial and many other significant architectural pieces, or Alvin Ailey who spent his lifetime in dance and choreography, or Spike Lee who dedicated his life to making challenging films, or J. K. Rowling who created a world that we cannot get enough of. Part of our task will be to identify other Singular Obsessors, to explore their lives and art forms, inventions, creations, and accomplishments. And, ultimately, to find inspiration for our own creative explorations of our own singular obsessions, which we will spend much of the quarter working on, and, at the end of the course, sharing with each other. Texts: To be announced. Credit / Evaluation: Faithful attendance. Active participation in class discussions, small group work, and in-class writings, exercises, and activities. Completion of an Obsessor Portrait, a Work Map and Proposal, a Singular Obsession Project, and a Final Presentation.

FAIR 497C De-Colonial Feminist Praxis

Credits: 2

Instructor: Spira

This praxis-based advanced course will provide a deliberate space for the further cultivation of de-colonial feminist research projects commenced in FAIR 336B and / or other pertinent ethnic, queer and feminist studies courses. Deepening our collective understandings of feminist research methodologies, the class serves as a "laboratory" for students to receive feedback and develop advanced projects. In addition to pursuing their own projects, students will also be responsible for ongoing discussions on the politics of our research methodologies and for providing critical and supportive feedback to their peers. Outcomes can include the preparation of a written piece for publication, a conference panel or paper, graduate school applications, an edited collection / journal or 'zine, and other creative or scholarly projects.

Assessment Assessment will be based upon mandatory attendance, reading engagement as evidenced through discussion and regular written reflections, critical respectful peer feedback and the proposal, development, and completion of a final project.

Required Texts Linda Tuhawai Smith, De-Colonizing Methodologies, London: Zed Books, 1999.

Michelle Cliff, If I Could Write this World on Fire, Minneapolis: U Minnesota Press, 2008.

FAIR 497G Introduction to Fugitive Thought in Higher Education

Credits: 2

Instructor: Calderon

In this seminar we will mainly read from the work of Fred Moten and Stefano Harney in The Undercommons: Fugitive Planning & Black Study to understand student activism in the contemporary moment. The text is guided by the idea of fugitivity/fugitive thought, or what it means to refuse logics that are presented as commonsensical but instead are built upon antiblackness. This course is designed for students who have a solid understanding of critical theory through either humanities, social science, or science and technology studies lenses. More specifically, the seminar is intended to enable students to:

1. Develop an understanding of a set of histories, concepts, perspectives, and theories that center Black thought to examine student activism;

2. Articulate their understanding of student activism through the lenses of theory and higher educational policy.

Texts: The main text for the course will include The Undercommons: Fugitive Planning & Black Study by Fred Moten and Stefano Harney with accompanying blogs and media sources.

Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will take account of regular attendance, evidence of critical reading, engagement in class discussion and completion of assignments.