Courses

Fairhaven College Course Descriptions

Below you will find our current course descriptions.  Previous quarter course descriptions are also available by selecting the quarter and year you are searching for.  Electronic course descriptions are available back to winter 2009.  For information on days and times as well as location please visit ClassFinder.  To register for these classes log into Web4U. Important information about registration including deadlines and fees can be found on the Registrar's Office page.  For any questions about these course descriptions or for assistance with registration please call the Fairhaven College Office at 360-650-6680. For information on Fairhaven College Wait List Policies click here.

Fairhaven College Core Requirements:

Classes determined to satisfy a Fairhaven Core requirement will be identified using the following icons: 

Letter CRequired Core Music Note Humanities and the Expressive Arts II
Leaf iconScience and Our Place on the Planet II Human iconSociety and Individual II

Non-Fairhaven Students

Most Fairhaven classes open to all WWU students who meet the prerequisites in Phase II of registration.

FAIR 101A Introduction to Interdisciplinary Study Required Core

Credits: 1

Instructor: Blick

This course will be taught remotely via the internet and synchronously during the time listed on the Class Schedule.  

This class aims to introduce students to Fairhaven College resources, practices, processes, and possibilities in their first quarter of enrollment in our program. Our class activities will include small group workshops, introductions to Fairhaven resources and people, community-based activities, and individual advising. We will introduce the educational practices used at Fairhaven (Writing Portfolio; Transition Conference; Independent Study, Interdisciplinary Concentration, Narrative Evaluations, etc.) and share the essentials you need to proceed toward your chosen major and take charge of your education.

Texts: There are no textbooks. Course materials provided in class and on Canvas.

Credit/Evaluation: This course part of the Fairhaven College Core Curriculum and is a graduation requirement. Award of credit will be based on documented attendance, participation, and completion of assignments as indicated in the class syllabus. Bring your curiosity, your questions, and your active engagement.

The learning outcomes for FAIR 101a include understanding resources, degree pathways, requirements, and pedagogy that are the mission and practice at Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies.

FAIR 197E Experiential Learning in the Outback Farm

Credits: 1

Instructor: Kempton

 This course is scheduled to be taught using a combination of in-person face-to-face fieldwork. 

This course provides an opportunity for a cohort of students to explore the Outback Farm while we discuss food, farming, sustainability, and methods for regenerating the environment. Classes will meet outside in the Outback Farm so we can focus on hands-on learning, gardening basics, and harvesting the bounty of the farm. This course includes readings, reflections, and a student self-evaluation.

FAIR 201A Critical & Reflective Inquiry Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Blick

Theme: The 2020 United States Election

This course will be taught online remotely and synchronously during the time listed on the Class Schedule. 

As I write this course description the Covid-19 compromised United States is quickly moving towards a November election that many see as the most important election in generations.  Donald Trump has been president for three years, with constant controversy, racism, sexism, anger, political division, an impeachment and acquittal, a pandemic, accusations of dictatorial desires, and more. For most of this time, the economy has hummed along with a booming stock market, and low unemployment, but also slow wage growth, and record numbers of Americans in poverty.  With the arrival of Covid-19 the economy has taken a sharp downturn and no one has yet figured out the short-term or long-term impact on the working class or the poor.  With this for context (and who can predict what else will happen before this course starts in September?), this class will focus on the dynamics of the 2020 election.  Students will be responsible for helping to determine many of the topics we will cover, and may include historical and current consideration of such things as the role of race in American politics, voter suppression, Christian conservatism, the new rise of American Democratic Socialism, the role of women in the 2020 mid-term election, the politics of immigration, and others. 

Our primary work will be to develop and answer questions that we wish to research, sometimes as a whole class, sometimes in small groups, and sometimes individually.  Students in the class will have a hand in deciding what questions we ask and will conduct the research (with my help and the help of reference librarians) to answer them.  We will seek diverse viewpoints on these questions, from the political right, the left, and from international observers.  I have no political agenda in teaching this course, but rather seek to help students construct well-supported answers to the questions we ask.  Students will develop reading and writing skills, library and internet research skills, communication and discussion skills, and skills in collaborative work.  Since all these skills are necessary parts of the Fairhaven College student’s academic toolkit, we will practice them regularly in this course.

Text:  To Be Determined.  Other readings will be assigned via Canvas.

Requirements for credit: Regular attendance in class, informed participation in class discussions, participation in the development of research questions and assignment of readings pertaining to the questions, weekly 2-3 page informed opinions on questions we are addressing, other written pieces, written reactions to class readings and other students’ writing, completion of two drafts of a research paper, and a presentation based on the research paper.

FAIR 201A Critical & Reflective Inquiry Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Sehman

Topic: Keywords in Sound

This course will run online, with weekly Zoom meetings during the time listed on the Class Schedule. In some ways, this will not drastically change the nature of the class: reading authors, engaging with ideas, coming together for discussion (on Zoom), writing responses and essays.

We may not be able to gather around a seminar table, but we will nonetheless try to find meaningful ways to connect as a community of thinkers.

Scholars in sound studies use sound "to ask big questions about their cultural moments and the crises and problems of their times."

In this class we will use a keywords approach to investigate topics in sound: Silence, Technology, Noise, Environment, Space, among others. We will examine these concepts as literal phenomena and as larger metaphorical concepts in culture. For example, silence as the absence of physical sound. And also silence as lacking a (political) voice. Or silence as an action, as in to be silenced. (Or the inverse, as a form of resistance: an "unsilencing.") Sound studies is inherently interdisciplinary, with the core tenet that we examine our world through the framework of sound. Therefore students of many interests should participate: Sound activism, sound history, sound and technology, sound and race, sound and media, deafness studies, psychology of sound / sound perception, sound and gender, sound in post-colonial studies ("sound imperialism"), sound as an expressive art (sound in film, music, multi-media art, etc.)

Assignments:

1. Students will be asked to complete a research project in a topic of particular interest to them, which may draw from any of the above (or other) areas of study.

2. Students will write a personal reflection paper addressing some element of sound in their lives (past or present).

3. Students will make a creative sound piece using sounds they create, found sounds, field recordings, etc. No technical experience is required in sound editing or creation; Rather only a desire to engage with the world, and express through sound.

Texts: Novak, David and Matt Sakakeeny, editors. Keywords in Sound. Duke University Press, 2015. Hopper, Jessica. The First Collection of Criticism by a Living Female Rock Critic. Featherproof Books, 2015. Graff, Gerald and Cathy Birkenstein. They Say / I Say: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing. 4th ed., W. W. Norton, 2018.

FAIR 201A Critical & Reflective Inquiry Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Simon

Theme: Information Dystopia

This course will be taught online remotely and synchronously during the time listed on the Class Schedule.

Not long ago, "fake news" was a sarcastic self-reference used by purveyors of biting political satire and media criticism on a comedy channel. In 2016, "fake news" took on a new connotation: false stories disseminated to purposefully disinform the public for fun and profit, with social networks the medium, and the levers of national power the stakes. Politicians in power began to deride legitimate reporting and verifiable fact as "fake news" in order to delegitimize bad news about themselves. Political commentators have claimed that we live in a "post-fact" reality - that verifiable facts are no longer relevant to those who seek power or to the public, and that journalists, long the safeguards of the free and accurate flow of information that is the life's blood of democracy, are powerless to demand them. What happened? In this course, we'll develop tools for discerning fact from opinion. We'll look at the differences between legitimate persuasion, where facts and evidence are presented logically, and propaganda, in which communicators use sophisticated psychological techniques to manipulate viewers, readers, listeners, and scrollers into doing their bidding. We'll learn to recognize, resist, defang, and debunk this type of message when we see it in any medium - and to communicate effectively, ourselves, with writing practice that uses logic and evidence to get our own ideas across honestly, and with power. Consider it Defense Against the Dark Arts.

FAIR 201A Critical & Reflective Inquiry Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Tag

Theme: Writing in Place

This course will be taught online remotely and synchronously during the time listed on the Class Schedule.

The world offers itself to your imagination.--Mary Oliver.

In this seminar, we will explore many questions. Here are some: What is the relationship between where we are and who we are? What connects locality to identity, landscape to language, place to self? How does the world offer itself to our imaginations? What does it mean to write from a certain place? How do particular places affect us: cities, woods, rooms, vehicles, mountains, farms, schools, deserts, hospitals, bodies of water? What kinds of places and spaces do we share with other people? What are the possible connections between our writing and the places it emerges from? What are the diverse ways we can write, map, illustrate, or document our lives and the contours of our personal, social, and ecological geographies? What happens to us when we encounter places or spaces, or ways of thinking and being, that are unknown, unfamiliar, or strange to us? To help us examine these questions, we will read novels, personal narratives, academic essays, philosophical reflections, and poetry. We will do lots of writing exercises and keep a Book of Questions. We will do research, write academic and personal reflection essays and research papers, create annotated bibliographies, and give presentations to the class. And our assignments will encourage us to get out and about, look around, investigate, see what we can learn in the field, outside, in places themselves. At the heart of our collective explorations and investigations will be a spirit of curiosity and wonder about our diverse lives on this planet and their deep and surprising connections to the places we live in, travel through, and imagine.

Texts: Sandra Cisneros, THE HOUSE ON MANGO STREET; Ruth Ozeki, A TALE FOR THE TIME BEING; Natalie Goldberg, WRITING DOWN THE BONES.

Credit/Evaluation: Faithful attendance, participation in class discussions and activities, and completion of all individual assignments and group work. Quality of written and creative assignments, including an Autobiographical Essay, a Research Essay and Presentation, and a Book of Questions.

FAIR 201A Critical & Reflective Inquiry Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Takagi

Theme: Journeys

This course will be taught online remotely and synchronously during the time listed on the Class Schedule.

Instructors: Midori Takagi and Adrian Villicana

In this section we will explore the different kinds of journeys Americans have been taking over the centuries, and how they make sense of those life travels, through texts, films and through class discussion. In addition, we will embark on an intellectual journey, which will include developing and honing the skills, tools and knowledge to be a strong student and a productive, responsible member of the larger community. For each class member, this part of the journey will include identifying and analyzing one's voice and the privileges and burdens built into that voice, identifying and analyzing others' voices and building respect for those diverse perspectives, and to critically assess all forms of information (oral, written and visual). The main skill emphasized in this class will be writing. During the quarter you will sharpen and hone your writing skills. You will learn to construct an argument, gather evidence, shape your thesis to fit the audience, and organize your thoughts. In addition, you will also learn to seminar, peer edit papers, and critically analyze materials. Finally, you will learn to research and write a 6-8 page research paper with a minimum of 4 sources, proper citations and a bibliography.

Required Reading: To be determined. Readings on Canvas.

Additional requirements:

-Bring the articles or solid notes based on the readings to help guide you through the discussions.

-Regular attendance. 2 absences will reflect negatively on your evaluation. 3 absences and you will not receive credit for the class. If you are sick, please let me know. If there is a personal/family difficulty, please let me know as soon as possible.

-All papers must be typed, double-spaced, and with proper citations. Chicago, MLA or APA are acceptable. It does not matter which style you use, but it must be consistent and correct. I prefer that all assignments be uploaded onto Canvas and, on occasions, a hard copy brought to class.

-Active participation in class and small group discussions. If you are uncomfortable with speaking in front of people, please see me as soon as possible.

Paper requirements: Because there are numerous writing assignments, timely submission is absolutely required. Only 1 late assignment will be accepted. No other late assignments will be accepted and your tardiness will be noted on your evaluation. One biographical journey paper (2 pages, double-spaced). One reflection paper (2 pages, double-spaced) no citations needed. One research paper proposal (pages 1-2 only). One early draft of research paper (4 pages) plus citations. One full draft of Research paper (rough draft 6-8 pages) the research paper. Double-spaced + 12-point font, one-inch margins all around, and proper citations. Final version of research paper (6-8 pages, double-spaced) + proper citations. Writing plan due

FAIR 202A Core: Humanities & Expressive Arts I Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Feodorov

This course is scheduled to be taught using a combination of synchronous online remote instruction and optional in-person face-to-face studio work in small groups.

Description: Throughout history art has both adorned and justified the lifestyles of the rich and famous. From huge idealized statues of rulers to the often-frilly paintings of 18th Century French Rococo, art has both pandered to and titillated the upper classes. However, it is a rash over-simplification to dismiss the entire history of Art as catering only to the tastes and values of the wealthy and powerful. In this course we will not only investigate how art has been complicit with power, but also how artists and theorists both create and advocate for art that critiques and resists power, voices their experiences and identities, promotes and supports social change, and envisions alternative futures. In addition, students will create 3 visual art projects based upon the themes discussed in class, write short response papers to required readings, and actively participate in class discussions. Students will also research and give a verbal presentation in class on a visual artist whose work they admire and fits within the theme of the course.

Note: While course fees go to providing some basic art supplies, students will still need to purchase their own to use at home and to bring to class. What these are will of course depend upon what each student chooses to use for their projects. A suggested supplies list will be forwarded to registered students before the quarter begins.

Text: No text is required. However, required readings will be made available on Canvas or online.

Credit and Evaluation: Evaluation is based upon regular and attentive attendance, timely and thoughtful completion of all assignments, informed and consistent participation in class discussions, and demonstrated commitment and engagement with their projects. More than three unexcused absences will result in no credit being awarded.

 

FAIR 203A Social Relationships & Responsibilities Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Estrada

Theme: Theories and Critiques

This course will be taught online remotely and synchronously during the time listed on the Class Schedule.

This section will explore the process of social identity formation in the United States through the lens of modern social theory. The goal of the class is to explore multiple perspectives on the formation of the state, individual rights within society, equality as well as the roles and responsibilities of individuals within their respective communities. The focus of the class will concern itself with the roots and application of Western ideals of freedom and equity that arguably form the basis for the United States' liberal democracy. The seminar will outline the origins of the enlightenment and the basis for "natural" rights and freedoms in conjunction with the derived roles of society and government. We will then examine how the universalist ideals of the liberal enlightenment have implicitly or explicitly excluded those without property, people of color, and women. We will also define what the "social compact" has meant in different periods of American history, and the relationship of various groups to this compact. Can liberal democracy really provide equal citizenship for workers, women, and people of color? How have the movements of socialism, reconstruction, decolonization, ethnic identity and feminism tried to reformulate and transform the social order?

Texts: Selected Readings on John Locke and Adam Smith; C.Lemert, 6th ed., Social Theory: The Multicultural & Classic Readings (Westview: Perseus Books, 2013); M.J. Sandel, Justice: What's The Right Thing To Do (NY: Farrar, Strauss, Giroux, 2009); Recommended Reading: Zinn, H. People's History of the United States: 1492-Present, (NY: Harper Collins, 2003)

Requirements for Credit and Criteria for Evaluation: Credit will be granted for regular attendance, evidence of preparation, satisfactory completion of 2-3 written perspective papers in addition to a group term project and class group presentation. Criteria for evaluation include informed and active engagement in class discussions; informative, relevant group presentation and a term project paper that illustrates a sound grasp of social theory and critical paradigms.

FAIR 203A Social Relationships & Responsibilities Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Pierce

Theme: Liberation & Domination

This course will be taught online remotely and synchronously during the time listed on the Class Schedule.

Instructors: Clayton Pierce & Michael Schulze-Oechtering

This course introduces students to modern social theory by focusing on themes of liberation and domination in the work of classic as well as marginalized thinkers. In exploring the theme of liberation and domination, we will trace how various influential thinkers of the modern period have constructed arguments that have been adopted and applied by the state to govern its populations and formulate theories around democracy, justice, equity, and political economy. We will be asking key questions that direct our critical inquiry to foundational assumptions and forms of evidence used by modern social theorists to construct and legitimize these concepts. These questions include, how have modern social theorists such as John Locke constructed conceptions of private property and freedom? How do early conceptions of freedom and property justify the institution of slavery in the U.S.? In what ways do founding documents such as the Declaration of Independence set the stage for "Manifest Destiny" and indigenous dispossession and genocide? How do modern theories of society allow for and promote gendered ideologies and practices of oppression and violence in the workplace and society in general?

In addition to these questions, we will also be charting theories of liberation and emancipation that developed alongside and in opposition to dominant modern theories of society. Here we will examine the readings of Mary Wollstonecraft, Karl Marx, Ida B. Wells, W.E.B. Du Bois, Angela Davis, The Combahee River Collective, and others. So, in this sense, the course will critically analyze the dominant current of modern social theory as well as its revolutionary and liberatory undercurrents.

Learning Outcomes: Define and understand the principal assumptions of modern social theory; Draw connections between modern notions of freedom, equality, private property, as it relates to the development of institutions and other governing mechanisms of the state; development of the ability to critically read texts; developing critical writing skills through the construction of well researched and evidence-based arguments.

Required Texts: TBD Credit/Evaluation: Participation in-class discussion and regular attendance; Timely and thoughtful completion of course readings and writing assignments; quality of writing

 

FAIR 206A Science & Our Place on the Planet I Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Schwandt

Theme: Population, Health, and the Environment

This course will be taught using a combination of in-person face-to-face meetings and online remotely and synchronously during the time listed on the Class Schedule.

Course Description: Exploring Malthus' premise through a lens two centuries later, students in this course will learn the primary factors influencing population growth: births, deaths, and migration, and apply this knowledge to understand global population dynamics. Topics will include the demographic transition, the youth demographic gift, population aging, rapid urbanization, and the effect of HIV/AIDS on population growth. Links between population, health, and the environment will be emphasized throughout the course, such as the effect of rapid population growth, especially urbanization, on environmental degradation, as well as the effects of environmental degradation on human survival.

Text: Laurie Mazur, A Pivotal Moment: Population, Justice and the Environmental Challenge (Washington DC: Island Press, 2010)

Requirements for Credit and Criteria for Evaluation: Students will be evaluated on their attendance, preparation for, via reading reflections, and participation in course discussions, as well as one group research project, presentation, and paper (2,000-word minimum) in a group, designed population, health, and/or environment research question of the group's choice. For the group research project, your group will select a research question, collect data in regards to that question, analyze the data, and write up the results. We will use Microsoft Excel to analyze the data.

FAIR 210A World Issues

Credits: 5

Instructor: Akinrinade

This course will be taught online remotely and synchronously during the time listed on the Class Schedule.

Description: Course Description: As global citizens, what do we know and understand about global issues and ourselves in a world faced with complex issues, such as, growing economic disparities, fragile democracies, environmental degradation, wars and militarism, civil liberties, racial profiling, and globalization? How do we become intelligently informed? What is our awareness of and participation in local and global efforts for positive social change? This course explores the complex dynamics of our globalized world from a holistic, inter-disciplinary, and transnational perspective. Together we examine multiple world issues, such as global inequality and poverty, food security, human rights, water, energy, population growth, migration, cultural change, and public health, and of our individual and community roles as agents of social change on local and global levels. This course is connected to the Wednesday World Issues Forum speaker series. Text/Readings: TBA Credit/Evaluation: Attendance (required); preparation for class; respectful, engaged participation in class; reading and speaker reflections; a final summary essay, and a social justice action. There will be no course credit for anyone who misses three (3) classes in the quarter.

FAIR 226H Words

Credits: 4

Instructor: Tag

This course will be taught online remotely and synchronously during the time listed on the Class Schedule.

Were you thinking that those were the words, those upright lines? those curves, angles, dots? / No, those are not the words, the substantial words are in the ground and sea, / They are in the air, they are in you.--Walt Whitman

Description: Words, words, words. This course is a celebration of--an immersion in, an exploration of, a wallowing in, an investigation of--the world of words. What we say, what we hear, how we think--nearly all of it is filtered in some way through the medium of words, spoken and unspoken. We will examine the amazing power of words to seduce, to name, to cajole, to threaten, to heal, to hurt, and to inspire. We will follow the sometimes strange and illuminating paths of word roots, as well as challenge ourselves to coin new words out of the vital and vibrant stuff of our lives. We will engage in wordplay and word games, in the fun of puns, the twang of slang, the bargain of jargon, and in the prime-time grime and chime of rhyme. At the heart of it all will be the words themselves--tangible though elusive, delicious though common, electric though silent. This is a course for those of us who want to get inside the words we use every day, who want to see the beauty and power in what we say to each other, in what we write, and in what we sometimes lose at the tip of our tongues and sometimes find in the vast word-hoards of our minds. We will read dictionaries. We will scan newspapers, magazines, poems, advertisements, the Internet, and books for words that seem intriguing, puzzling, wild, essential, dangerous, and keys to understanding the world we live in. We will eavesdrop, listening for the rhythms and cadences and odd and common ways words are strung together in speech. We will investigate, research, and think about words, dream about words, eat our words, and write our own word histories and essays, perform our spoken words, and make our own personal dictionaries.

Texts: Sarah Kay, NO MATTER THE WRECKAGE; John McWhorter, WORDS ON THE MOVE

Credit/Evaluation: Faithful attendance, participation in class discussions and activities, and completion of all readings, individual assignments, and group work. Quality of written assignments, including a Name Essay, a Taboo Word Essay, a Poetry Performance, and a Personal Dictionary Project.

FAIR 246 Mariachi Music, Performance & Culture

Credits: 3

Instructor: Miyake

This course will be taught online remotely and synchronously during the time listed on the Class Schedule.

This course is repeatable for up to a total of twelve (12) credits. Ever since its establishment as a centerpiece of Mexican popular culture in the first half of the 20th century, Mariachi music has acted both as a central expression of Mexican identity and also as one of the most widely recognized representations of Mexican people and culture for those outside of this community. Students in this class will explore this cultural and artistic movement through both academic engagement and hands-on experience in creating this music themselves. Class meetings will include sessions in which we will discuss academic and popular texts on Mariachi music and culture as well as participating in discussions with guest speakers and performers, and sessions in which class members will learn to perform Mariachi music in both individual and ensemble formats. No experience in performing Mariachi music is required for this class- all instruction and expected musical collaborations will be designed to fit the experience level of each individual student.

Required Texts: Wade, Bonnie C. Thinking Musically: Experiencing Music, Expressing Culture. 3rd ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 2013. Sheehy, Daniel Edward. Mariachi Music in America: Experiencing Music, Expressing Culture. New York: Oxford University Press, 2006. Texts for this course will also include other articles, book chapters, and music as assigned by the instructor. NB: Alternate readings will be provided for students who have already received credit for this course in an earlier quarter.

Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will take account of regular attendance, evidence of critical reading, engagement in class discussion and completion of assignments.

FAIR 255Y Folk Music Experience

Credits: 2

Instructor: Bower

Theme: Protest Music

This course will be taught online remotely and synchronously during the time listed on the Class Schedule.

This course combines playing folk music with the study of the contexts in which folk music has evolved.  For this quarter, we will study protest music throughout United States history, along with protest music from other countries, including civil rights, LGBTQ, anti-war, environmental, and other political movements and perspectives. Students will be expected to participate in discussions on readings assigned during the first five weeks of the course.  Each student will be asked to introduce one song to the class that is relevant to the protest music genre and enriches our knowledge of folk music or the context within which folk music has been written and performed. Students will write a short research paper that forms the basis for their presentation on the song and its context.  Students will also be responsible for learning and practicing the songs that are presented to the class, including practice in small groups.  Students are encouraged to gain practice at playing one or more folk music instruments during the course and are invited to join the course even if they are beginners at playing an instrument or if they prefer to just sing.

Texts: Texts will change from quarter to quarter.  Fall 2020 text will be Dorian Lynskey: 33 REVOLUTIONS PER MINUTE

Credit/Evaluation:  Regular attendance and participation in our weekly sing, informed participation in class discussions, one short research paper, and song presentation, and practicing music in a small group.

FAIR 270H Intro to Audio Recording

Credits: 4

Instructor: Wallace

This course is scheduled to be taught using a combination of in-person face-to-face studio work in small groups and synchronous online remote instruction. 

Introduction to Audio explores the techniques, tools, and technology used in multi-track recording. From a beginner's perspective, this course works to develop the fundamental skills of critical listening, analog signal flow, and basic analog/digital hybrid recording. By examining the various steps in the recording process students will learn the concepts and skills necessary to use studio equipment such as microphones (their characteristics and placement), mixing consoles (explained in detail), hard disk recording, patch bays, signal and effects processors, and headphone systems. In addition to regular class times each student is also expected to attend a weekly two-hour small group lab, held in the studio, giving the student a chance to experience multi-track recording in a hands-on manner.

Texts: Modern Recording Techniques (9th edition) by David Miles Huber and selected online readings.

Credit/Evaluation: Students will be evaluated through a combination of participation, attendance (lab and lecture), reading assignments, and understanding gained from the material evaluated from a hands-on assessment. Additionally, students will be required to complete a basic tracking session with their lab assistant in the studio as a final project.

FAIR 303A Concentration Seminar Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Calderon

This course will be taught online remotely and synchronously during the time listed on the Class Schedule.

Prerequisites: FAIR 101A, FAIR 201A, FAIR 203A, FAIR 305A

What questions do you want to explore in your Interdisciplinary Concentration? (Are you asking questions, for example, about inequalities, ecology, musical cultures, or performance?) Why are these questions important enough intellectually, politically, socially, or professionally to form the basis for your Interdisciplinary Concentration?

Your challenge in the Concentration Seminar is two- or three-fold. First, you must answer the question of why your concentration matters to your own satisfaction. Second, you want to communicate the reasons why your concentration's questions matter to the mythical "average reader" in your rationale. Third, you must identify the set of courses, independent study projects, internships, or other forms of experiential learning that allow you to explore your underlying questions about your subject for the rest of your time at Fairhaven College.

In practical terms, the seminar is designed to assist you with your development and writing of an interdisciplinary concentration. It will serve as a forum for discussion, guidance, and support during the proposal writing process. You will work collaboratively with your seminar, your instructor, and your concentration committee, to write your learning proposal and identify relevant courses and experiences to help you achieve your educational goals.

Here are some of the practical questions this seminar will help to address: What are the appropriate guidelines and requirements involved? What exactly is it you want to achieve in your degree? How can your intentions be given effective shape and form? Who should be on your committee? How do the parts of your concentration work together conceptually? What are the best vehicles for your learning? What should you put in and what should you leave out of your concentration?

Text: Handbook on Canvas and occasional Readings distributed in class.

Credit/Evaluation: Faithful preparation for and attendance at the seminar; Steady work on your proposal; Contributions to the development of your group members' proposals. Credit for the course is granted when your completed committee-approved proposal has been filed with the Fairhaven Curriculum & Records Manager and a regular narrative self-evaluation form is submitted to the instructor.

FAIR 305A Writing & Transition Conference Required Core

Credits: 3

Instructor: Miyake

This course will be taught online remotely and asynchronously.

The Writing Portfolio and Transition Conference are Core graduation requirements for all Fairhaven College students. Your Writing Portfolio will be a selective collection of your academic writing and an introductory statement of self-assessment about your writing at this point in your education. It will be reviewed and assessed by your Fairhaven faculty advisor. Your Transition Conference is a constructive mid-point conversation with advising resource people you invite to share your educational plans and collect advice officially moving you from the "Exploratory" stage of Fairhaven's program into the "Concentrated" stage of your educational plans, regardless of your choice of major. You should embark on these requirements when you and your faculty advisor agree you're ready for them. This is not a class, however you must attend one orientation meeting early in the quarter. Details about the orientation meeting schedule will be sent to all enrolled students via email and posted on the FAIR 305A class CANVAS site.

In order to receive credit for FAIR 305A you must: 1) Submit your Writing Portfolio prepared according to specifications to be provided at our orientation and on our class Canvas site. 2) Schedule and conduct a Transition Conference which includes writing and circulating a Transition Conference Statement to your invited participants prior to the conference.

Additional details and instructions will be provided at our orientation and on our class Canvas site.

FAIR 311B The United States Legal System Society and Individual 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Lopez

This course will be taught online remotely and synchronously during the time listed on the Class Schedule.

An in-depth look at the U.S. legal system and how it affects individuals and society, with coverage of legal vocabulary, sources of law, the structure of the government, the Supreme Court and the judicial system. Case analysis skills will be stressed, including identifying the issue, procedural history, facts, reasoning and holding of each case. Students will also engage in a mock trial and write a legal memorandum. This class (or PLSC 311) is required for the Law, Diversity and Justice concentration (major) and minor. It serves as a foundational course for anyone interested in learning about law in the U.S.

Minimum Requirements to receive Credit: 1) Students must complete and submit on time five (5) case briefs or more 2) Prepare and participate in the mock trial 3) Complete and submit on time all writing exercises 4) Prepare and submit on time the assigned legal memorandum 5) Regular attendance to class -No more than THREE absences allowed 6) Class participation - Answer questions presented either prompted by instructor or other students, participate in small group discussion, demonstrate participation in group projects, and participate in case discussion

Required Books: Edited casebook by Professor - Available from Bookstore A Practical Guide to Legal Writing and Legal Method - Sixth Edition. John C. Dernbach, et al. ISBN: 9781454880813 Any Legal Dictionary

FAIR 334C International Human Rights Society and Individual 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Akinrinade

This course will be taught online remotely and synchronously during the time listed on the Class Schedule.

Description: This course examines the idea of human rights, its historical, philosophical and legal origins. It explores the notion of universal rights and examines the relativity debate. It will introduce students to rights that are guaranteed and selective substantive rights will be examined - civil and political rights; economic, social and cultural rights, and other classes of rights. Other considerations include national, regional and international institutions created to supervise implementation of and compliance with those rights. It will also consider the role of non-governmental organizations and activists who seek to enforce human rights. Text: TEXTBOOK ON INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS, by Smith, Rhona K. M. Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will take account of regular attendance, evidence of critical reading, engagement in class discussion, the quality of short reactions, and two assignments. There will be no course credit for anyone who misses three (3) classes in the quarter.

FAIR 334P Field Studies: Biology of Soils Science and Our Place on the Planet 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Jessica Gigot

This course is scheduled to be taught using a combination of in-person face-to-face fieldwork and synchronous online remote instruction. 

Soil is alive! This course explores biologically-mediated processes in soil and the multiple functions of soil biota in both managed and unmanaged ecosystems. Throughout the quarter we will examine the primary communities of organisms that make up the soil food web, like fungi and nematodes. Using lectures, readings, discussion, and hands-on demonstration at WWU's Outback Farm, students will evaluate the critical role these organisms play in soil productivity and resiliency. Areas of inquiry include soil taxonomy, soil quality, nutrient cycles in soils, and soil food web interactions. We will spend several weeks reviewing and assessing biological soil health indicators on the Outback's soil which will culminate in a group soil analysis report. Applied soil ecology concepts, like bioremediation and composting, will also be highlighted.

REQUIRED TEXTS: Building Better Soils for Better Crops 3rd Edition by Fred Magdoff Harold Van Es (free download available); Comprehensive Assessment of Soil Health--The Cornell Framework (free download available); Additional readings, articles, and information will be provided on CANVAS.

LEARNING OUTCOMES:

>Identify soil organisms and understand their function in soil

>Define soil health and its applications in agriculture and natural ecosystems

>Relate biologically mediated processes in soil to environmental resilience >Evaluate the role of soil biology in applied soil ecology concepts

EVALUATION: Participation in discussions and demonstration activities, completion of i) weekly response papers ii) Outback Farm soil analysis group project iii) Mid-term take-home exam and iv) Individual research paper and presentation due at the end of the quarter.

FAIR 335C Multicultural Psychology Society and Individual 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Delucio

This course will be taught online remotely and synchronously during the time listed on the Class Schedule.

Description: Multicultural Psychology is a field that seeks to understand how variability among different cultural groups within the U.S. can offer insight into viable models of everyday experiences. We will explore how multiculturalism is viewed within psychology and how it impacts both research and applied aspects in the field. Historically, multicultural psychology has had a primary focus on racial identity within the U.S. context; however, there is increasing need to understand how social identities exist in relation to one another. As such, we will examine the intersections between race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, ability, and other social/marginalized group memberships. We will be examining questions such as: What is multiculturalism and what does it take to define something as "multicultural"? How does someone's intention factor in when considering the impact of race-related comments? What are possible impacts of stereotypes on academics, employment, and parenting? In addition, we will explore differences in worldviews (e.g., individualism v. collectivism), means of communication, cultural identity development, acculturation, ways to build multicultural competence, and critiques of the field. Emphasis will be placed on empirical research and psychological theory, aimed at helping you develop ways to apply and discuss these theories as they relate to real-word examples and events.

Required Texts: Mio, J., Barker, L., Domenech-Rodriguez, M., & Gonzalez, J. (Eds.). (2019). Multicultural psychology: Understanding our diverse communities (5th ed.). Oxford University Press. Tatum, B. D. (2017). Why are all the Black kids sitting together in the cafeteria? And other conversations about race (2nd ed). Basic Books: New York. Additional readings will be uploaded to Canvas

Recommended reference: American Psychological Association. (2020). Publication manual of the American Psychological Association (7th ed.). Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association.

Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will include regular attendance; active and engaged participation in class discussions; facilitating discussion about an assigned article; 2 reflective papers; and a final literature review about a topic related to multicultural psychology.

FAIR 335Q Qualitative Research Methods Society and Individual 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Delucio

This course will be taught online remotely and synchronously during the time listed on the Class Schedule.

Description: We all have curiosities and questions about how the world works. In the realm of social science, these questions typically center around people...how they interact, how they understand one another and their society, how they identify, what impacts their behavior, and how we can help them. This course will serve as an introduction to qualitative social science research methods and how to implement empirical research projects. We will cover topics including philosophies of science, an overview of the research process, conducting ethical studies, differences in qualitative methods and methodologies, biases in the research process, evaluating existing research, and community-based approaches. We will also be discussing interviewing strategies and how we can use qualitative methods as a means of story-telling. Some overarching goals of this course include: demystifying the research process and what it entails, and developing projects that may serve as a foundation for a future ISP or senior project. This course will emphasize that, at its core, research is about tapping into one's curiosities, asking questions, and figuring out ways to answer them.

Required text: Braun, V., & Clarke, V. (2013). Successful qualitative research: A practical guide for beginners. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publishing.

Recommended reference: American Psychological Association. (2020). Publication manual of the American Psychological Association (7th ed.). Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association. Additional readings will be uploaded to Canvas Evaluation Criteria: Regular attendance; active and engaged participation in class discussions and activities; a reflective paper outlining personal motivations influencing research topics of interest; a research proposal on a topic of your choosing; and a final presentation.

 

FAIR 336B Psychology of Music Society and Individual 2

Credits: 4

This course will be taught online remotely and synchronously during the time listed on the Class Schedule.

Music is often thought to be a human universal; something that people experience and engage with throughout history and across cultural groups. What, then, are the functions of music? The purpose of this course is to examine this question from multiple psychological perspectives. We will start within a biological framework and consider the evolutionary origins of music, its neural mechanisms, and the development of music processing. Next, we will turn to the fields of cognitive psychology and embodied cognition to explore the relationship between music and language as well as how music is used to communicate emotive meaning that can influence visual processing and body movement. From the personality and social psychological perspectives, we will examine the ways in which music can contribute to and reproduce a sense of personal, social, and collective identity. Finally, we will consider musical behavior in applied contexts, such as consumer behavior, music therapy, and the medical environment. By the end of the course, students will be able to have meaningful and complex conversations about the function of music as it relates to human experiences and behavior, informed by empirical findings and various psychological perspectives. Moreover, students will be able to apply course content to understand music's influence on their own life.

*Note. Students are not required to be able to read music or have an extensive music background.

Required Texts: Readings will be posted on Canvas and will primarily be empirical readings from the psychological literature, with a particular focus on biological/evolutionary, cognitive, personality, and social psychology.

Criteria for Evaluation: Regular attendance to online class/discussion/activity sessions (i.e., no more than 3 absences); active and engaged participation in class discussions and activities; one concise 3-4-page paper on what ideals/beliefs are reproduced given to what we listen; and one multi-stage project consisting of: study/article review and summary, follow-up idea (e.g., research question, intervention, teaching a musical concept) with reference list, and final presentation.

FAIR 336B Indigenous Political Thought Society and Individual 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Baker

This course will be taught online remotely and synchronously during the time listed on the Class Schedule.

Theme: Indigenous political thought, research methodologies and knowledge production

This course engages with critical Indigenous thinkers in order to provide a foundation in theories of political mobilization, cultural resurgence and decolonization. Because kinship relationships to place and all existents of that place are fundamental to understanding indigeneity, these concepts must be studied in the context of particular Indigenous peoples. To that end we will read works by Pacific Islander and First Nations knowledge producers, and engage on the ground with Salish Sea knowledge producers to understand the ways that Indigenous communities are working towards transforming colonial relationships embedded within settler state structures. In addition to exploring ways that Indigenous peoples mobilize to resist these settler state structures of domination, we examine the ways Indigenous communities are building networks of Indigenous futures through embodied ancestral knowledge and place-based ethics in the present. This course also asks us to reflect on our on-going political responsibilities with respect to settler and Indigenous relationships.

Credit/Evaluation: Regular attendance, engaged/active participation in all class exercises, engagement in-class discussion, strong evidence of reading, quality performance on assignments throughout the quarter, quality of writing.

Required Texts Decolonizing Methodologies: Research and Indigenous Peoples. Smith, Linda Tuhiwai; A Nation Rising: Hawaiian Movements for Life, Land, and Sovereignty. Goodyear-KaК»ЕЌpua, Noelani, Ikaika Hussey, and Erin Kahunawaika'ala Wright, eds.; and As We Have Always Done: Indigenous Freedom Through Radical Resistance by Leanne Simpson.

FAIR 336N Cooking, Cuisine, & Sustainability Science and Our Place on the Planet 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Tuxill

This course is scheduled to be taught using a combination of in-person face-to-face fieldwork and synchronous online remote instruction. 

This course starts with the premise that our personal health and the ecological health of our planet both depend upon what happens in the kitchen. We will explore the science and culture of food preparation and preservation, with a goal of understanding how culinary traditions and scientific knowledge can inform contemporary ideas about cooking and eating. Along the way we also will cook together in class each week, gaining and sharing the basic kitchen literacy needed to make timely, delicious meals--and to make healthy, ecologically sustainable food a vital part of our busy American lives.

Texts: COOKED by Michael Pollan. Other readings will be drawn from a broad range of academic and applied literature and distributed via Canvas.

Credit/Evaluation: Regular attendance and informed contribution to discussions and in-class cooking is essential. You also will be required to 1) keep a kitchen journal; 2) research, write, and present a study of the natural history of a particular food ingredient, dish, or culinary technique; 3) participate in a group project on food system sustainability analysis; and 4) contribute to a class recipe collection.

 

FAIR 336N Northwest Mycology Science and Our Place on the Planet 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Lloyd

This course is scheduled to be taught using a combination of in-person face-to-face fieldwork and synchronous online remote instruction. 

Like Santa Claus, mushrooms are cloaked in mystery, lying hidden for most of the year only to pop out and surprise us with bounty. This course concerns mycology- the study of fungi, a kingdom of life more closely related to animals than plants. We will examine several types of fungi includes mushrooms, yeasts, and molds, focusing on those which play a tremendous role in ecological communities in the Pacific Northwest or are important to humans for food and medicine. During this course students will gain practical skills in identifying and using mushrooms and develop an applied research project.

Texts:

Required- MUSHROOMS DEMISTIFIED by David Aurora, MYCELIUM RUNNING by Paul Stamets. Other required readings will consist of journal articles, and essays made available electronically.

Recommended- ALL THAT THE RAIN PROMISES by David Aurora.

Weekly student expectations: >1 hour asynchronous lecture. Posted Mondays. Complete by Thursday afternoon. >1-2 hours of readings to be completed by Thursday afternoon. >3 hour face to face field trip*/lab Thursdays from 3:30-6:30PM. >2-4 hours of independent work on assignments and studying for quizzes. *Students must be capable of getting themselves to field trip locations 3-30 miles from campus.

Credit/Evaluation: as part of the course, students will be expected to: 1)Prepare a digital collection of 50 mushroom species that includes digital photographs of the mushroom, habitat, and spore print along with notes about how the species can be used. 2)Research and write a paper about a mushroom species. 3)Give a brief class presentation about a significant mushroom species. 4)Weekly quizzes on mushroom ID and lecture/reading themes. 5)Contribute to a collaborative class project related to mushroom cultivation, mycoremediation, or other topics related to this course. Regular class attendance and informed contribution to discussions is essential. Students also will be evaluated on their grasp and understanding of the themes and issues presented in the readings.

Topics: Mushroom anatomy, ecology (carbon cycling, symbiotic and parasitic relationships), food species (wild edible mushrooms, cultivated mushrooms, role in beer, wine, cheese), medicine, recreation, sustainable harvest, major mushroom families (amanitas, agarics, boletus, morel, truffle, bizarre mushrooms like codonopsis, yeasts and molds, etc.), and mycoremediation.

FAIR 336V Mixed Media Art & Social Commentary Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Feodorov

This course is scheduled to be taught using a combination of synchronous online remote instruction and optional in-person face-to-face studio work in small groups.

Course Description (Please note that this is a 300-level studio art course. Prior experience in art-making is required since the course assumes students have already developed some basic technical skills.)

In the early 20th Century many artists began combining non-traditional materials into their artworks in order to develop what they believed to be a more "total", relevant and even revolutionary art form. Utilizing images and text from newspapers and magazines, combining photography, found objects, drawing, painting, audio, and film they pushed the boundaries of what was considered Art at the time. Though they had varying objectives, many used this new strategy of art-making as a means of portraying, critiquing, and advocating for social change and justice. Their ideas and experiments continue to influence and inspire new generations of artists, especially in our digital age.

This course will introduce students to alternative methods of creating visual art and its potential for commenting upon and advocating for social and environmental justice. Students will draw from issues that they are learning about in their other classes to create informed artworks that examine and critique our current global situation. Students are responsible for completing 6 art projects using a variety of media and materials, as well as writing artist statements for each project. Students are required to read and write short responses to five essays during the quarter. Two of these will be of the student's choosing and related to the topic they wish to explore through their art projects. Students are also required to actively participate in class discussions and project crits.

Note: While course fees go to providing some basic art supplies, students will still need to purchase their own to use at home and to bring to class. What these are will, of course, depend upon what each student chooses to use for their projects. Text: No text is required. However, required readings will be made available on Canvas or online.

Credit and Evaluation: Evaluation is based upon regular and attentive attendance, timely and thoughtful completion of all assignments, informed and consistent participation in class discussions, and demonstrated commitment and engagement with their projects. More than three unexcused absences will result in no credit being awarded.

FAIR 339 Folk & Traditional Music in the U.S. Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Miyake

This course will be taught online remotely and synchronously during the time listed on the Class Schedule.

Students in this course will examine a wide range of community music traditions in the United States from bluegrass festivals to mariachi music to local punk scenes in settings ranging from urban night clubs to rural front porches. Students will examine these cultural events and practices through an ethnographic perspective and focus on the relationship between music production and participation and the broader cultural contexts in which they occur. Through the discussion of course readings, audio and video examples, discussions with guest speakers, and primary ethnographic research, students will both become more familiar with a number of specific folk and traditional music practices and also gain a clearer understanding of the roles these music traditions play in their specific performance contexts as well as the broader US cultural system with which they interact every day. It is also the aim of this study to enable students to more clearly understand their own participation in community music cultures of the United States and to more closely consider the role of this music in their own lives and cultural practices as well as in the lives of others both nearby and across the country.

Required Texts:
Lornell, Kip, and Anne K Rasmussen. The Music of Multicultural America: Performance, Identity, and Community In the United States. Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2016.
Murphy, Clifford R., Henry Glassie, Douglas Dowling Peach, and Ola Belle Reed. Ola Belle Reed and Southern Mountain Music On the Mason-Dixon Line /. Atlanta, GA: Dust-to-Digital, 2015.

Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will take account of regular attendance, evidence of critical reading, engagement in-class discussion, two written assignments, and one research paper.

FAIR 343U Embodied Agency

Credits: 4

Instructor: Nichols

“When we are engaging introceptive awareness we momentarily break the hold of the habitus, we ‘unbraid’ movement practices from ideological ends and open up the possibility of no longer perpetuating ‘social structures at the level of the body.” - Deidre Sklar

Course Description: We are Homo Sapiens Sapiens, which is Latin for wise or knowing. Sapience comes from this root and refers to wise judgment and judgment refers to the understanding of rightness or wrongness, usefulness, or value of activity and action. As humans we have named ourselves after our capacity for reflective awareness, we are aware that we are aware and within this awareness, we must act and we must choose. With awareness comes language, which is paramount for our coordinated construction of identity, action, and culture. In order to have a sense of agency, we must be able to choose some direction, some course of action, and coordinate activity, language, and relationships to produce our intentions. Although it is easy to take agency for granted it is built on a highly complex and interdependent relationship between cultural practices and embodied activity. This course follows two major threads, embodiment, and agency, to understand how they work together to create our movement through the world. Although “movement through the world” is seemingly simple it is this very aspect that is the most complex and deserving of deep inquiry, as movement is contextual and understood through the ability to construct identity, feel our identity, and coordinate our experience to express our intentions. We will utilize the literature of embodiment, agency, and phenomenology to create and bolster our language and our conceptual understanding of choice and movement in context of self, culture, race, class, and gender. Simultaneously we will develop our natural and innate capacities for reflective awareness through mindfulness and somatic experiential learning.

Required Texts: Agency and Embodiment: Performing Gestures/Producing Culture 2009 by Carrie Noland. Several peer-reviewed articles supplied in class.

Credit/Evaluation: Regular and on-time attendance, informed & engaged discussion, and completion of all assignments: Four 3-5 page reading synopsis, midterm project, and a final collaborative presentation.

FAIR 370I Introduction to Pro Tools

Credits: 4

Instructor: Wallace

This course will be taught online remotely and synchronously during the time listed on the Class Schedule.

Intro to Pro Tools builds off knowledge gained in the Intro to Audio course regarding the use of basic audio recording equipment, such as mixing consoles, compressors, equalizers, and other outboard processors. Students will take this knowledge and apply it to the digital realm while learning the specifics of recording audio and MIDI, editing, and mixing using Avid's Pro Tools software. Covered topics will include importing and recording audio into Pro Tools, editing and manipulating performances, MIDI, the use of plug-ins, and an overview of mixing processes such as compression/limiting and equalization. Students will be expected to attend class regularly and demonstrate critical listening skills through critique of their classmates' work. Additionally, the Fairhaven Mixing Suite, Fairhaven Recording Studio, and the Miller Hall computer lab will be available for use all quarter to allow access to the Pro Tools software. Students are will be required to utilize these facilities in order to complete their assignments and demonstrate competency in using professional studio equipment. Texts: Online materials. Credit/Evaluation: Projects will be evaluated throughout the quarter by the instructor.

FAIR 370J Studio Recording

Credits: 4

Instructor: Fish

This course is scheduled to be taught via in-person face-to-face instruction. 

Prerequisite: FAIR 370I or FAIR 370P Studio Recording I takes the concepts introduced in Intro to Audio and Intro to Pro Tools and allows the student to apply and practice them in a hands-on manner, with the goal of becoming familiar with and competent in the use of the equipment in the Champion St Studio. Students will complete at least four multi-track recording projects and will have the opportunity to work on other recording sessions as well. Through the students' work on these projects they will learn efficiency and speed in the techniques of tracking, overdubbing, and mixdown sessions. The recording projects will be evaluated by the instructor as well as the other students in the class. This course will also involve development of critical listening skills as well as the creative and imaginative expression possible in audio recording. Students will keep a detailed journal of their session work. This is a Pro Tools based course and enrolled students will gain access to the Fairhaven Studio, Mixing Suite, and Champion St Studios. Texts: The Recording Engineer's handbook (3rd edition) by Owsinski Credit/Evaluation: Each student must finish the assigned projects which will be critiqued by the instructor and peers based on sound quality, balance, clarity and realization. Overall evaluation will be made based on effort, participation and growth as an engineer.

FAIR 370K Advanced Studio Recording

Credits: 4

Instructor: Fish

This course is scheduled to be taught via in-person face-to-face instruction. 

Prerequisite: FAIR 370J or FAIR 370H This class will give students with advanced recording experience the opportunity to record and mix on an industry standard Pro Tools 12 HD system. Students will enhance their knowledge of Pro Tools and learn how to use this software in conjunction with a large-format analog mixing console. Topics such as drum sample replacement, audio quantization, convolution impulse responses, spectrum analysis, DSP processing and other advanced topics will be covered. Students will be expected to conduct at least three recording/mixing sessions throughout the quarter and prepare a final portfolio for in-class critique. Students will also learn how to properly configure Pro Tools HD hardware and software components, how to setup session templates and how to utilize each component of an HD/analog system. Enrolled students will gain access to the Fairhaven Studio, Mixing Suite, and Champion St Studios. Texts: Reprinted materials Credit/Evaluation: Projects will be evaluated throughout the quarter by the instructor and the other

FAIR 375S Business Plans & Social Entrepreneurship

Credits: 4

Instructor: Coulet du Gard

This course will be taught online remotely and synchronously at the time listed on the Class Schedule

Description: This course examines business plans for social entrepreneurship (small business and nonprofit structures), emphasizing socially responsible and sustainable systems.

Have you ever dreamed of starting your own business or becoming part of a team to create a nonprofit organization? Have you ever wondered why so many small businesses and new nonprofits fail? This course is a practical course analyzing and applying step-by-step the major processes in creating a solid plan for social entrepreneurship success. Students interested in pursuing a career in the nonprofit world, creating their own nonprofit, or establishing a for-profit business will be required to create a business plan by the end of the quarter. Emphasis will be placed on US systems, although the course will also provide a few examples from international social entrepreneurship. Canvas documents comprise a part of the readings/videos.

Course Objectives: Upon completion of this course students will be able to:

  • identify basic components of a business plan
  • analyze case studies of for-profit and non-profit business plans
  • design and formulate a complete business plan
  • assess socially responsible and environmentally sound organizations

Texts and Materials: Required: 1. MacMillan, Ian and James D. Thompson. The Social Entrepreneur's Playbook, Expanded Edition, 2013 2. Lee, Jennifer The Right-Brain Business Plan: A Creative, Visual Map for Success, 2011 3. Canvas documents and links

FAIR 380A Music Production Composition Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Sehman

This course will run online, with weekly Zoom meetings. This course is largely project-based, so the online environment will ideally not change the fundamental goals of the class. As well, my hope is that peers will be able to meet online to share and comment on creative work throughout the quarter (as we would in person).

We will use the software Ableton Live, which students will need access to on their home computers. As of now, Live is available as a free 3-month trial, which will cover the entire length of the quarter.  

*If you currently own and use other DAW software, be in touch as it will likely work for this class.

*If you don’t have a computer to run the software, be in touch and we can explore options. (For example, ATUS may have laptops to loan, if you’re in Bellingham.)

Prerequisite: FAIR 270h (or concurrent)

The goal of this course is to provide students with the essential tools to create and express through music production, sound design, and composition. No experience is required, and this course intends to engage students at whatever experience level they enter at.

This course will focus on creating music using the software, Reason, though the topics and skills can be applied to many music-making platforms. We will learn the essential operation of that software, with the goal of empowering students to create music and sound pieces in a wide variety of styles, whether those be songs, experimental sound works, beat making, ambient music, or spoken word pieces.

Topics in Music production, sound design, and composition will include:

-Elements of sound synthesis: oscillators, envelopes, filters, LFOs.

-The instruments of music production: synths, samplers, sequencers, and drum machines.

-Sound design: manipulating, shaping, and processing material to expressive through sound.

-Using and manipulating samples to incorporate outside sound sources into the student's works.

-Song structure: forming the linear architecture and flow of a piece.

-Song orchestration: an examination of the "vertical" layering of sounds to create dense textures.

By the end of this course, students will have a portfolio of 4-5 pieces. This course will also focus on the creative process, as it relates to music production. As a group of active creators, we will discuss common creative practices, workflow, creative roadblocks, and other relevant topics that arise during the creative process.

Text: Making Music: Creative Strategies for Electronic Music Producers. By Dennis DeSantis

Requirements/Evaluation: Students will complete 4-5 sound projects. Students will be expected to actively pursue musical creation in this class. Evaluation will be based on the student's active involvement with their own work and engagement with the class, not the style or skill level of their creative work.

FAIR 381G Literature in Practice: The Poetics of Transgenerational Trauma Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Friedland

Topics in Literature: The Transgenerational

This course will be taught online remotely and synchronously during the time listed on the Class Schedule.

How does writing and reading connect us to events that we did not experience directly ourselves, but that we have inherited and are marked by nonetheless? What haunts our present, what ancestors do we feel burdened or impressed by?

In this class we will engage critically with Meena Alexander's notion of the poetics of transgenerational trauma ("the transmission of trauma across generations and its literary testimony") and connected theories, such as Marianne Hirsch's postmemory ("being connected to the past not by recall but by imaginative investment, projection, and creation"), and Jane Wong's poetics of haunting. We will look at literature that contends with familial histories, narratives of war and diaspora, collaborations with the dead, and writing as a space of collective and personal memory making. Together, we will consider what it means to be, what Jacques Lacan neologized as, the parlêtre--the speaking being, the body gripped by language. Part of this engagement will include embodied practices such as dream work and automatic writing.

Note: This class is rooted in the study of literature and will contextualize trauma primarily through the analysis and composition of prose and poetry. 

Required Reading: To be announced at the beginning of the quarter. 

Credit Evaluation: Active participation in book discussions and peer review. Students are also expected to produce a portfolio of original writings that integrates feedback and revision suggestions.

FAIR 381G Interdisciplinary Short Story Workshop Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Simon

This course will be taught online remotely and synchronously during the time listed on the Class Schedule.  

The short story is a specific literary art form in fiction; how might we use it to engage the ideas we are shaping and exploring in our other work – ideas about politics and equity and justice and environment and climate and physics and disease and food systems and urban design? In evolutionary biology or visual arts or music or law? How can we use fiction to approach problems and solutions and knowledges of all sorts?

 Short stories deal in the depths of human experience, the macrocosm in the microcosm. In this interdisciplinary Creative Writing workshop, we will explore the short story, with an eye to bending its shape to accommodate innovation in the form itself, and in the subject matter that the story might address. We will read exemplary published short stories that might engage the realms of other ways of knowing. Centrally, we will craft and critique and revise our own short stories. We will employ artmaking as an essential epistemological process, as a way of knowing, about the other fields of our interest – and the short story as a form for exploring ideas about the world.

Credit/Evaluation: Regular reading and homework assignments, 2-3 major written works, written and oral critique of classmates’ work.

 

FAIR 403A Advanced Seminar Required Core

Credits: 4

Instructor: Friedland

This course will be taught online remotely and synchronously during the time listed on the Class Schedule.

Anne Treat, Spring 2007 Fairhaven College graduate, said: "There is no possible way I can give justice to the complexity of experiences, triumphs, pitfalls, and challenges of my academic career in the course of this paper. This artifact of self-reflection is simply a pause in the broader conversation of my academic journey, an invitation for me to mindfully articulate the ways those things I've studied, read, discussed and experienced over the past four years have informed and challenged my personal development, and how I've chosen to integrate and express that knowledge through the actions of my life."

This seminar is a wonderful opportunity to reflect on what you have been up to all these years of being educated--through writing, conversation, presentations, and listening to each other. You will read and discuss a book and other readings, co-facilitating at least one discussion; write and share a variety of short writing assignments, designed to help you complete your Summary and Evaluation, and provide a supportive community in which to summarize and critically reflect upon your Fairhaven (or Life) education. Each student will also present or teach something to the class from the heart of his or her educational experience. This course is one of our favorites to teach at Fairhaven because we learn so much about our students, and the many intriguing, complex, deep, creative and quirky ways there are to be human and to become educated. The class also illustrates the value of writing as a process of discovery, synthesis, and meaning. We will all do our best to help you express most clearly what your education has been about, and are honored to learn from your stories, your minds, your creativity, and your lives. The course will be as significant as you make it. Be honest. It is your life, your education, so let us understand what it has meant and what it really means to you now.

FAIR 412E Criminal Law Society and Individual 2

Credits: 4

This course will be taught online remotely and synchronously during the time listed on the Class Schedule.

This course is a study of substantive American criminal law using a law school casebook. Topics include the theories of punishment and rehabilitation, intent, and defenses such as insanity and self-defense. We will compare the common law and Model Penal Code versions of criminal law by looking at case studies of specific crimes.

Requirements: Rigorous reading load, averaging 30 dense pages per class. Regular and punctual attendance required and students will be expected to come to class having read and briefed the legal cases. No more than three absences allowed. Weekly response papers and three papers of 4-6 pages of case analysis required.

Text: Joshua Dressler, Cases and Materials on Criminal Law (Sixth edition) (important to get the right edition)

Prerequisites: Introductory course on the American legal or political system (or permission of the instructor). 

FAIR 414D Topics in Social Justice Education Society and Individual 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Pierce

This course will be taught online remotely and synchronously during the time listed on the Class Schedule.

Historical & Philosophical Perspectives on Race-Class in Public Education

Course Description and Goals: The public education system in the U.S. has historically been considered the great "leveling" institution--one of only places people from all racial, ethnic, and class backgrounds have the best chance of achieving "the American Dream". But what if this story about public education in the U.S. has never been true? How would we re-evaluate the public education in the U.S. if we viewed this official history against the grain, from the standpoint of communities who have systematically remained racially stigmatized and economically disadvantaged is U.S. society despite access to public education? Moreover, what would reading the official history of the American public education system against the grain also tell us about white communities in the U.S. and in particular how schooling contributes to the ongoing project of white supremacy? In exploring these and related questions, this class takes an historical and philosophical approach in reassessing the goals and aims of the public education system in the U.S. by drawing on the Black Radical Tradition as well as settler colonial and Marxist thinkers. The primary goal of this course is twofold. First, to gain a better understanding of who the public education system in the U.S. was designed to serve and in what ways. The second goal will be to link this analysis to contemporary debates and controversies around antiblackness and education, the preservation and persistence of white supremacy U.S. society and culture, and indigenous education movements rooted in decolonial projects. The course will also focus on how marginalized communities have created and practiced resistive models of education in the U.S. that point to alternative ways of learning and being in society outside of these power dynamics.

Core learning objectives and themes of the seminar include:

>Ability to critically evaluate democratic assumptions of the public education system

>Draw connections between white supremacy, colonization, and capitalism to the design of public schooling in the U.S.

>Gain competency in areas of research such as the Black Radical Tradition and decolonial theorists

Learning outcomes of this course include:

>Being able to thoughtfully and critically evaluate evidence used in the debates on how to best fix the "achievement gap" between white and students of color

>Development of writing skills based on reasoned argumentation that recognizes and evaluates the merit of different forms of evidence

>Development of oral critical thinking skills and ability to provide strongly reasoned positions

Texts: All course Texts Available on Canvas course page

FAIR 432Q Ecological Restoration Science and Our Place on the Planet 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Tuxill

This course is scheduled to be taught using a combination of in-person face-to-face fieldwork and synchronous online remote instruction. 

Prereq: Fair 206A, equivalent introductory coursework in ESCI or ENVS, or permission of the instructor.

Long-term solutions to contemporary environmental problems involve not just conservation of the natural environment, but increasingly the restoration and recovery of ecologically healthy communities and landscapes. This course introduces you to the science and practice of restoring ecological systems. We will examine the implications of ecological theory for understanding how natural landscapes change in response to human activities. In particular, we will examine case studies where shifts in natural resource use, environmental policies, and land management have helped restore the ecological integrity of forests, rivers, grasslands, and other ecosystems. You will apply knowledge and build practical skills by working in groups to plan, implement, and assess ecological restoration projects at local field sites. Reflecting the interdisciplinary approach of this course, we also will connect our scientific understanding to social meanings of ecological restoration as experienced by individuals, communities, and cultures.

Texts: Reading assignments will be drawn from scientific journals and other primary texts, and distributed via Canvas.

Credit/Evaluation: Regular attendance and informed contribution to discussions is essential. Evaluation will be based on each student's grasp and understanding of the issues presented in the readings. Students also will: 1) work in teams to research, plan, implement, and evaluate an ecological restoration project locally; 2) document their work with a written project proposal, oral presentation, and final report; and 3) complete at least 2 hours of service learning with a local conservation organization involved in ecological restoration, documented with a brief written report.