Courses

Fairhaven College Course Descriptions

Below you will find our current course descriptions.  Previous quarter course descriptions are also available by selecting the quarter and year you are searching for.  Electronic course descriptions are available back to winter 2009.  For information on days and times as well as location please visit Classfinder.  To register for these classes log into Web4U. Important information about registration including deadlines and fees can be found on the Registrar's Office page.  For any questions about these course descriptions or for assistance with registration please call the Fairhaven College Office at 360-650-6680. For information on Fairhaven College Wait List Policies click here.

Fairhaven College Core Requirements:

Classes determined to satisfy a Fairhaven Core requirement will be identified using the following icons: 

Letter CRequired Core Music Note Humanities and the Expressive Arts II
Leaf iconScience and Our Place on the Planet II Human iconSociety and Individual II

Non-Fairhaven Students

Most Fairhaven classes open to all WWU students who meet the prerequisites in Phase II of registration.

FAIR 101A Intro Interdisciplinary Study Required Core

Credits: 1

Instructor: McClure

This class aims to introduce students to Fairhaven College resources, practices, processes and possibilities in their first quarter of enrollment in our program. Our class activities will include small group workshops, introductions to Fairhaven resources and people, community-based activities and individual advising. We will introduce the educational practices used at Fairhaven (Writing Portfolio; Transition Conference; Independent Study, Interdisciplinary Concentration, Narrative Evaluations...) and share the essentials you need to proceed toward your chosen major and take charge of your education.

Texts: There are no textbooks. Course materials provided in class and on Canvas.

Credit/Evaluation: This Fairhaven College Core Class is a graduation requirement. Award of credit will be based on documented attendance, participation and completion of assignments as indicated in the class syllabus. Bring your your curiosity, your questions and your active engagement. The learning outcomes for FAIR 101a include understanding resources, degree pathways, requirements and pedagogy that are the mission and practice at Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies.

FAIR 201A Critical & Reflective Inquiry Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Rowe

Topic: Information Overload This section explores the information explosion, the need to critically evaluate competing messages, and the importance of developing effective expressions of our own views. We will consider the plethora of technological innovations for conveying our words and how we manage them (or do they manage us?). We will entertain concomitant themes of credibility, diversity, and relevance in what we read and consider how to apply such concerns to our own writing. Our primary reading stimulates discussion with such questions as: How are Facebook and MySpace changing student life? How important is ethnic identity? Are there real, biologically caused differences between the way men and women act, think, speak, and behave? Do we need an ethics of consumption to combat child labor? Is a college education today the equivalent of high school forty years ago and are Americans getting dumber by the day? Is the earth warming at a dangerous rate or that just a lot of hot air? The essays written on different perspectives of these and other timely issues will help us hone our critical reading skills.

They will also serve as models for our own writing. Required Text: AMERICA NOW 11th ed., edited by Robert Atwan Recommended Text: A POCKET STYLE MANUAL 7th ed. by Diana Hacker. Credit/Evaluation: Credit will be awarded based regular, punctual attendance, meaningful contribution to discussions, completion of several essays, and completion of a formal research paper suitable for inclusion in your Fairhaven writing portfolio.

FAIR 201A Critical & Reflective Inquiry Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Bower

Politics in the Age of Trump: As I write this course description Donald Trump has been president for nearly two years. It's been two years of constant controversy, racism, sexism, angry, division, and more. All the while the economy (at least until October, when I wrote this) is humming along with a booming stock market, and low unemployment, but also slow wage growth, and record numbers of Americans in poverty. We will begin the course by seeking to understand the rise of Trump in both a historical context and in the dynamics of the 2016 election. Students will be responsible for helping to determine many of the other topics we will cover, and may include such things as the role of race in American politics, Christian conservatism, the new rise of American socialism, the role of women in the 2018 mid-term election, the politics of immigration, and others.

Our primary work will be to develop and answer questions that we wish to research, sometimes as a whole class, sometimes in small groups, and sometimes individually. Students in the class will have a hand in deciding what questions we ask, and will conduct the research (with my help and the help of reference librarians) to answer them. We will seek diverse viewpoints on these questions, from the political right, the left, and from international observers. I have no political agenda in teaching this course, but rather seek to help students construct well supported answers to the questions we ask. Students will develop reading and writing skills, library and internet research skills, communication and discussion skills, and skills in collaborative work. Since all these skills are necessary parts of the Fairhaven College student's academic toolkit, we will practice them regularly in this course.

Text: Abramowitz: The Great Alignment - Race, Party Transformation, and the Rise of Donald Trump. Other readings will be assigned via Canvas. Requirements for credit: Regular attendance in class, informed participation in class discussions, participation in the development of research questions and assignment of readings pertaining to the questions, weekly 2-3 page informed opinions on questions we are addressing, other written pieces, written reactions to class readings and other students' writing, completion of two drafts of a research paper, and a presentation based on the research paper.

FAIR 202A Core: Humanities/Express Arts Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Miyake

Music and Race in the US: Through this course, students will examine both the history of the representation of race and music in the US and also the ways in which such representations have been shaped by cultural, political, historical, social, and economic contexts in academia, the mass media, and popular culture. Students will examine a wide range of works including the accounts of early US professional and amateur ethnographers, modern popular music criticism, and academic works on this subject from the fields of anthropology, ethnomusicology, folklore, history, musicology, sociology, and cultural studies. These readings and class discussions will emphasize the ways in which multiple discourses from each of these different fields of study have impacted each other and worked both in unison and in tension to influence the ways in which the relationship between music and race in the US have been perceived and portrayed over the past several centuries. Required texts: Music and the Racial Imagination, Ronald Radano and Philip V. Bohlman, eds.; Black Lives Matter and Music: Protest, Intervention, Reflection, Fernando Orejuela and Stephanie Shonekan, eds. Texts for this course will also include other articles and book chapters as assigned by the instructor.

Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will take account of regular attendance, evidence of critical reading, engagement in class discussion, two written assignments, and one final project."

FAIR 203A Social Relationshp/Responsibil Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: O Murchu

The seminar will trace the origins of enlightenment ideas that "men" are born free and equal. We will examine how radical those ideas were in the context of their times, and how they provided a basis for limiting the power of the state and the church to intervene in propertied men's lives. We will then examine how the universalist ideals of the liberal enlightenment implicitly or explicitly excluded those without property, people of color, and women. We examine how workers' movements and thinkers, and African American thinkers, challenged, expanded, and deepened liberal conceptions of freedom and equality We ask whether modern liberal democracy can really provide equal citizenship for workers, women, and people of color, and we trace how movements for socialism, reconstruction, decolonization, and feminism try to remake the social order. My approach to teaching this course is that I will learn at least as much about our shared subject matter from you, my students, and our shared learning community, as any one of you will learn from me. The shared questions that we are all confronting in this course focus on the questions of what social justice requires and whether we can make the American social order (more) just. These questions are real, challenging and interesting for us and we hope that you will join us in the hard, but rewarding, struggle of thinking about these questions. Texts: Most course readings are available on Canvas including selections from John Locke's Second Treatise, and Karl Marx's "Alienated Labor," and Wage Labor and Capital. Three required books are: Patricia Hill Collins, Black Feminist Thought: Knowledge, Consciousness, and the Politics of Empowerment, 2nd ed. (NY: Routledge, 1999); Martin Luther King, Where Do We Go from Here?: Chaos or Community (Boston: Beacon, 2010); and Sara Uribe, Antgona Gonz lez, translated by John Pluecker (LA: Les Figues, 2013) Requirements for Credit: Faithful attendance and preparation; active and mutually respectful participation; three analytical papers (including one rewrite); a final short creative project; self-evaluations.

FAIR 203A Social Relationshp/Responsibil Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Pierce

Liberation & Domination

This course introduces students to modern social theory by focusing on themes of liberation and domination in the work of classic as well as marginalized thinkers. In exploring the theme of liberation and domination, we will trace how various influential thinkers of the modern period have constructed arguments that have been adopted and applied by the state to govern its populations. We will be asking key questions that direct our critical inquiry to foundational assumptions and forms of evidence used by modern social theorists. These questions include, how have modern social theorists such as John Locke constructed conceptions of private property and freedom? How do early conceptions of freedom and property justify the institution of slavery in the U.S.? In what ways do founding documents such as the Declaration of Independence set the stage for "Manifest Destiny" and indigenous dispossession? How do modern theories of society allow for and promote gendered ideologies and practices of oppression and violence in the workplace and society in general. In addition to these questions we will also be charting theories of liberation and emancipation that developed alongside and in opposition to dominant modern theories of society. Here we will examine the readings of Mary Wollstonecraft, Karl Marx, Ida B. Wells, W.E.B. Du Bois, Angela Davis, The Combahee River Collective, and others. So, in this sense, the course will critically analyze the dominant current of modern social theory as well as its revolutionary and liberatory undercurrents. Learning Outcomes: Define and understand the principal assumptions of modern social theory; Draw connections between modern notions of freedom, equality, private property, as it relates to the development of institutions and other governing mechanisms of the state; development of ability to critical read texts; developing critical writing skills through the construction of well researched and evidence based arguments. Required Texts: TBD Credit/Evaluation: Participation in class discussion and regular attendance; Timely and thoughtful completion of course readings and writing assignments; quality of writing

FAIR 203A Social Relationshp/Responsibil Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Delucio

Theme: Intersectionality Description: Intersectionality has become a buzzword in academic, social justice, and (increasingly) mainstream discourse. For example, "intersectional feminism" as a term and framework to critique the mainstream feminist movement for lacking an intersectional scope in its praxis. The purpose of this course is to dissect intersectionality and work towards understanding what it means at numerous levels. We will examine the history of the concept including its origins stemming from the experiences of Black women, its academic adoption, and how it is used in social science research. We will discuss how intersectionality fits within the framework(s) of traditional and modern social theory, and how it can serve to expand our sociopolitical understandings of U.S. society. From here, we'll also explore how intersecting societal oppressions can impact our day-to-day lives and our development of self. We will see how we can use an intersectional lens when analyzing popular media (e.g., TV shows, movies, music) to address issues of (mis)representation and appropriation. We will also identify the critiques and limits of intersectionality as a concept and theoretical framework in order to develop a working approach towards improving how we use this concept in thought, language, expression, and experience. Required Texts: Grzanka, P. R. (Ed.). (2014/2018). Intersectionality: A foundations and frontiers reader. New York, NY: Routledge Hill Collins, P. & Bilge, S. (2016). Intersectionality. Malden, MA: Polity Press. Additional readings will be uploaded to Canvas.

FAIR 206A Core:Science/Our Plc on Planet Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Bower

Environmental Photography This class aims to use photography as a tool to advance our understanding of nature. We will work on advancing our photographic skills and to develop an understanding of how cameras work, but our main goal in the class will be to use the camera to study the environment from a variety of perspectives through individual and group photography assignments and original group scientific research projects. Weekly photo shoots will focus on topics as technical camera skills, an environmental photo essay, animal behavior, nature in winter, and exploring a taxonomic group (for example, mosses or birds). The course culminates with small groups using photography to conduct a scientific study. Examples might include conducting a photographic survey of tree species on Sehome Hill, comparing historical vs. modern photographs to study environmental change over time, photography to analyze the distribution of tree species near rivers, or using photographs or video to study aggression in gulls at the beach. Note: For this course students will need to access a camera that allows them to control aperature and exposure (in other words - not a phone camera or a point and shoot camera), ideally an SLR style camera - these can be borrowed from Classroom Services at WWU. Texts: John Cox: Digital Nature Photography and other readings assigned via Canvas. Please note: The book for this course is available either via Kindle through Amazon, or you can buy a used copy (for almost no money) at a website. It will not be for sale in the WWU bookstore because it is out of print. You must buy one before the course starts. Requirements: Regular attendance in class and on field trips, completion of two drafts of a 5 page scientific paper based on a group field project, written responses to reading, weekly photo shoots, and a portfolio of photographs turned in at the end of the course.

FAIR 215F The Asian American Experience

Credits: 4

Instructor: Takagi

The Asian American Experience This is an introduction to the history and experience of Asians in America. This class will explore the factors for immigration, working and living conditions of Asian laborers in this country, and the social relations between the minority and majority, as well as those between the various Asian ethnic groups. Reading Requirements: Erika Lee, The Making of Asian America, A History Articles on Canvas Written Requirements: Annotated bibliographies of the readings. 1 paper (10 pages) This is a joint project.

Take home exam.

FAIR 221J Interdisciplinary Writing

Credits: 4

Instructor: Simon

In the 21st century, innovators will have to explain their ideas clearly and compellingly, and in various forms, to suit our message-dense media environment. This course is a craft / writing workshop in which students incorporate the art of storytelling to write creative personal essays (or other forms or hybrids - magazine features, memoirs, thought experiments, or interdisciplinary works, for example) based on their own interests, or on their work in their individualized majors or courses of study. Here, you can sharpen your chops for explaining, illustrating, and illuminating your ideas in writing, and use the crucial tools of elemental analysis and the creative writing workshop to hone your skills for persuasion through storytelling. You will learn to report your findings in creative and compelling new ways that could work as pieces of long-form journalism, as blog posts, as nonfiction book chapters, radio programs, podcasts, or some other new or not yet imagined form. We will work in a few modes - which may include short story, personal essay, reportage, and basic argument. Credit/evaluation: written assignments and revisions, written and oral critique of classmates' work, and regular attendance. Texts: Readings will be provided. Students will provide hard copies of their work for classmates.

FAIR 246 Mariachi Music/Perform&Culture

Credits: 3

Instructor: Miyake

Ever since its establishment as a centerpiece of Mexican popular culture in the first half of the 20th century, Mariachi music has acted both as a central expression of Mexican identity and also as one of the most widely recognized representations of Mexican people and culture for those outside of this community. Students in this class will explore this cultural and artistic movement through both academic engagement and hands-on experience in creating this music themselves. Class meetings will include sessions in which we will discuss academic and popular texts on Mariachi music and culture as well as participating in discussions with guest speakers and performers, and sessions in which class members will learn to perform Mariachi music in both individual and ensemble formats. No experience in performing Mariachi music is required for this class- all instruction and expected musical collaborations will be designed to fit the experience level of each individual student. This course is repeatable for up to a total of twelve (12) credits. Required Texts: Wade, Bonnie C. Thinking Musically: Experiencing Music, Expressing Culture. 3rd ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 2013. Sheehy, Daniel Edward. Mariachi Music in America: Experiencing Music, Expressing Culture. New York: Oxford University Press, 2006.

Texts for this course will also include other articles, book chapters, and music as assigned by the instructor.

NB: Alternate readings will be provided for students who have already received credit for this course in an earlier quarter Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will take account of regular attendance, evidence of critical reading, engagement in class discussion and completion of assignments.

FAIR 255Y Folk Music Experience

Credits: 2

Instructor: Bower

John Lennon & The Beatles This course combines playing and singing "the people's music," however that is defined, as well as the contexts in which this music has evolved. Students are encouraged to gain practice at playing one or more folk music instruments during the course, and are invited to join the course even if they are beginners at playing an instrument or if they prefer to just sing. For this quarter, we will study the culture and music surrounding John Lennon and the Beatles. We will read about John Lennon's life and the lives of his bandmates, friends, and other contemporaries. Students will be expected to participate in discussions on readings assigned during the first five weeks of the course. Each student will be asked to introduce one song to the class that enriches our knowledge of folk music or the context within which folk music has been written and performed. We will encourage the introduction of songs that come from music related to John Lennon and his contemporaries. Students will write a short research paper that forms the basis for their presentation on the song and its context. Students will also be responsible for learning and practicing the songs that are presented to the class, including practice in small groups.

Texts: Texts will change from quarter to quarter. For this course, we will read Philip Norman: JOHN LENNON: THE LIFE. Credit/Evaluation: Regular attendance and participation in our weekly sing, informed participation in class discussions, one short research paper and song presentation, and practicing music in a small group.

FAIR 270B Intro to Digital Video Prod

Credits: 2

Instructor: Miller

This class will introduce basic camera use and video editing in the digital medium. Students will script, shoot, and edit 5 assignments using Final Cut Pro X. Projects range from a 30-second commercial to a 3-5 minute final video on the student's choice of topic. The assignments are set up to encourage individual creativity & personal editing styles. Texts: Class Readings Credit/Evaluation: Completion of assignments, participation in class, attendance, and understanding gained from the class assignments.

FAIR 270H Intro to Audio Recording

Credits: 4

Instructor: Wallace

Introduction to Audio explores the techniques, tools, and technology used in multi-track recording. From a beginner's perspective, this course works to develop the fundamental skills of critical listening, analog signal flow, and basic analog/digital hybrid recording. By examining the various steps in the recording process students will learn the concepts and skills necessary to use studio equipment such as microphones (their characteristics and placement), mixing consoles (explained in detail), hard disk recording, patch bays, signal and effect processors, and headphone systems. Each student is also expected to attend a weekly two-hour small group lab, held in the studio, giving the student a chance to experience multi-track recording in a hands-on manner. Texts: Modern Recording Techniques (9th edition) by David Miles Huber and selected readings from The Audio Expert by Ethan Winer. Excerpts from the Audio Expert text will be available online. Credit/Evaluation: Students will be evaluated through a combination of participation, attendance (lab and lecture), reading assignments, and understanding gained from the material evaluated from a hands-on assessment. Additionally, students will be required to complete a basic tracking session with their lab assistant in the studio as a final project.

FAIR 297K Quant Rsrch Mthds

Credits: 4

Instructor: Delucio

Description: We all have curiosities and questions about how the world works. In the realm of social science, these questions typically center around people...how they interact, how they understand one another and their society, how they identify, what impacts their behavior, and how we can help them. This course will serve as an introduction to quantitative social science research methods and how to implement empirical research projects. The topics of this course will also be applicable to those with an interest in life and/or physical sciences seeking to understand, critique, and execute empirical studies. We will cover topics including philosophies of science, an overview of the research process, conducting ethical studies, experimental and descriptive research designs, biases in the research process, evaluating existing research, and critical quantitative approaches. Some overarching goals of this course include: demystifying the research process and what it entails and developing projects that may serve as a foundation for a future ISP or senior project. This course will emphasize that, at its core, research is about tapping into one's curiosities, asking questions, and figuring out ways to answer them.

Required text: Ruane, J. M. (2005). Essentials of research methods: A guide to social science research. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing.

Recommended reference: American Psychological Association. (2010). Publication manual of the American Psychological Association (6th ed.). Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association. Additional readings will be uploaded to Canvas. Evaluation Criteria: Regular attendance (i.e., no more than 3 absences); active and engaged participation in class discussions and activities; a reflective paper outlining personal motivations influencing research topics of interest; a research proposal on a topic of the student's choosing; and a final presentation.

FAIR 297L Trauma-Informed Engagement

Credits: 4

Instructor: Rowe

Trauma-informed care (TIC) is a growing field in a variety of vocational and educational settings, including behavioral health services, human services, teaching, emergency health care, cognitive health services, and more. Beyond vocational strength, many of our loved ones have or will experience trauma in their lives; by understanding trauma, we can offer informed, sensitive support to those working through the healing process. This seminar, taught by undergraduate student Abigail Miller, and sponsored by Professor Dan First Scout Rowe, focuses on the topic of TIC. Included within this course: The basics of understanding trauma, including the psychology and physiology of trauma; fostering trauma-sensitive spaces and multicultural care; treatment techniques for trauma recovery; coping strategies for those healing from trauma; local/regional/national resources; and critical examination of current TIC practices. Students will reflect their learning through weekly written, audio, or video reflections. At times, it may be tempting to use the topics discussed to process personal traumas, so reflection prompts will ask students to think beyond themselves. For example: What community setting do you envision using this information in, whether professionally, in a volunteer setting, or educational space? How might you implement the information into your selected community setting? What group(s) of people could benefit from learning about what we discussed in class this week? In addition to weekly reflections, students will engage with the creative process of making an altered book. To create an altered book, students will paint pages of an old hardback book of their choice (provided by instructor); use color, images, quotes, poetry, and writing to reflect on the information presented in class. This is not a personal journal. Ideally, the product will become a tool the students can reference in the future. Students will also complete a research-based final project of either a 4 to 5-page written paper or a 20 to 25-minute class presentation on the TIC topic of their choosing. Credit & Evaluation: Students must regularly attend class, with no more than 3 missed classes; complete all assigned readings; contribute informed participation in class discussions; complete weekly reflections as written, audio, or video submissions; complete a final paper or presentation; and complete the altered book project. Required Texts: Psychology of Trauma 101 by Lesia M Ruglass Disclaimer: This class, which delves into topics of trauma, will not be utilized as a platform for processing personal trauma. As an undergraduate student, I am not a certified therapist and therefore not adequately equipped to assist fellow students in processing personal trauma. If you are currently in recovery from trauma it may not be a good time for you to take this class, as some topics may be triggering and emotionally challenging. If you're interested in the topic of trauma-informed care, but unable to take the class, I encourage you to e-mail me (mille506@wwu.edu) for a list of sources used in the class for future studying.

FAIR 303A Core:Intrdisc Cncntrtn Sem Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Feodorov

Prerequisites: FAIR 101A, FAIR 201A, FAIR 203A, FAIR 305A What questions do you want to explore in your Interdisciplinary Concentration? (Are you asking questions, for example, about inequalities, ecology, musical cultures, or performance?) Why are these questions important enough intellectually, politically, socially or professionally to form the basis for your Interdisciplinary Concentration? Your challenge in the Concentration Seminar is a two- or three-fold one. First, you must answer the question of why your concentration matters to your own satisfaction. Second, you want to communicate the reasons why your concentration's questions matter to the mythical "average reader" in your rationale. Third, you must identify the set of courses, independent study projects, internships, or other forms of experiential learning that allow you to explore your underlying questions about your subject in the rest of your time at Fairhaven College. In practical terms, the seminar is designed to assist you with your development and writing of an interdisciplinary concentration. It will serve as a forum for discussion, guidance, and support during the proposal writing process. You will work collaboratively with your seminar, your instructor, and your concentration committee, to write your learning proposal and identify relevant courses and experiences to help you achieve your educational goals. Here are some of the practical questions this seminar will help to address: - What are the appropriate guidelines and requirements involved? - What exactly is it you want to achieve in your degree? - How can your intentions be given effective shape and form? - Who should be on your committee? - How do the parts of your concentration work together conceptually? - What are the best vehicles for your learning? - What should you put in and what should you leave out of your concentration? Text: Handbook on Canvas + Occasional Readings distributed in class Credit/Evaluation: Faithful preparation for and attendance at seminar; Steady work on your proposal; Contributions to the development of your group members' proposals. Credit for the course is granted when your completed committee-approved proposal has been filed with the Fairhaven Records Office and a regular self-evaluation form is submitted to the instructor.

FAIR 312 DIY Music Business Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Sehman

The music business has undergone staggering changes in recent years due to changing technologies, and the collapse of many of the old gatekeepers, corporations and power structures. Funding, production, promotion and distribution have largely become the artist's responsibility. While this has democratized creative music making in exciting and powerful ways, it has also placed new responsibilities on the independent artist. This course will begin with an examination of the traditional aspects of music business, including: Copyright, royalties, distribution, licensing, publishing and record contracts. We will follow that with an extensive study of the new DIY music business. We will look at the practical methods and skills required of today's musician, including: Direct engagement with listeners, creating an effective online presence, promotion, contacting media, booking shows, and successful methods for releasing and distributing recorded music. We will also examine the complex social and artistic issues that are a result of changes in the music business, such as: Copyright and ownership in the digital age; the (de)commodification of recorded music; power structures between corporations and the independent artist. Our dialogue surrounding the above topics will be based on the writing of experts in the field, the shared knowledge and experience of class members, and case studies/analysis of current artists and their innovative and creative methods in music business. *All students are welcome to participate in this course, whether they are an active musician or are simply interested in the state of the current music business. Texts: Herstand, Ari. How to Make it in the Music Business: Practical Tips on Building a Loyal Following and Making a Living as a Musician. Liveright, 2016. Passman, Donald. All You Need to Know About the Music Business. 9th ed., Free Press, 2015. Requirements/Evaluation: Students will be expected to complete readings and viewings for each class meeting, and actively participate in the resulting discussions. There will also be written reflections on select topics and readings. Students will complete a music business/entrepreneurship project on a topic of their choosing, which they will present to the class.

 

FAIR 312D Global Culture & World Society Society and Individual 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: O Murchu

How does globalization impact everyday life in the Global South and North? Is there an emergent world society or do friction and disjunctures shape relations between global and local institutions and cultures across the world? Does Globalization lead to a common cosmopolitan culture? transnational religious, social and political social movements, cultural flows, and institutional forms both represent and contest cultural globalization? This course explores special in global culture and world society. It is linked to World Issues Forum speaker series. Examples of topics include global popular culture in music or cinema, global health practices, transnational social movements, the diffusion of human rights, and borderlands cultures & literatures. This quarter the focus of Global Culture and World Society is on national identity in global cinema as a global cultural form of apprehending, communicating, and contesting the world. Course Texts--See reading schedule below; Available via Canvas and WWU Library Requirements for Credit: Faithful attendance, preparation and respectful, engaged participation; six discussion posts on World Issues Forums; a book review essay; a justice lab engagement; and a final synthetic analysis paper. ACGM GUR Competency (Personal and Social Responsibility: Understand and evaluate assumptions, values, and beliefs in context of diverse local, national and global communities.) In this course, students are exposed to values and viewpoints from a variety of cultures and societal roles through the World Issues Forum speaker series. Studying and writing about the heterogeneities of contemporary global society helps us to overcome provincialism, aids self-understanding and is an important element in an educated outlook on the contemporary world. ?

FAIR 314E Critical Pedagogy Society and Individual 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Calderon

In this course we will draw from empirical research to examine the social, political, economic, and historical context of schooling for students of color in U.S. K-12 and higher educational systems. Students will be introduced to a set of ethnic studies concepts and theories from which to better understand the educational experiences and realities of historically underrepresented students. The course will also challenge students to reflect on their educational experiences and the schooling conditions of students of color in general, and to apply the concepts introduced in class to their own educational experiences. More specifically, the course is intended to enable students to: 1)Develop an understanding of the histories, concepts, perspectives, and theories used to examine the complex realities of historically underrepresented students; 2)Articulate their understanding of concepts such as privilege, microagressions, institutional racism, whiteness, resistance, decolonization, and activism, and apply these concepts to their personal educational experiences and to the debate over educational (under)achievement, (in)equity, and the politics of education; 3)Engage in inter-ethnic/racial dialogues about race and racism, the use of power and privilege to institutionalize inequity, methods for achieving social and educational change. Texts: Pedagogy of the Oppressed, Teaching to Transgress. other Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will take account of regular attendance, evidence of critical reading, engagement in class discussion, and completion of assignments.

FAIR 323G Writing Practicum LongProjects Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Friedland

Writing Practicum--Long Projects Prerequisites: Students who have taken one of the following: 222H, 323G, 381G; or alternatively have worked on main campus or through self-directed ISP study in the field of creative writing; or by permission of the instructor. This writing workshop will focus on long projects (a collection of stories, poems, novella or novel) in progress. During each in-class session we will workshop a student's manuscript and offer line edits, revision suggestions, discussions, and additional reading recommendations. As part of your workshop you will be asked to give a presentation and a short reading of your manuscript in process, in turn you will offer your peers weekly feedback and close reading suggestions. At the end of the course you will provide a short reflection on your revision process and a plan for the completion of the project beyond the course. This practicum is designed for committed writers who need peer support and time to proceed with a longstanding work. There will be some additional readings on form, process and revision practices as well as occasional guest lectures from published authors. Students have to be willing to read manuscripts of substantial length and make time for extended writing and revision of their own work. While the class ultimately does not require you to *finish* a manuscript, your final manuscript, due at the end of the quarter, will be a new draft of your initial submission.

Evaluation: active participation during our in-class peer review sessions, timely submission of drafts and peer feedback, a fully revised submission of the manuscript in progress at the end of the quarter. Selected readings will be distributed through Canvas and in class.

FAIR 334L The Holocaust Society and Individual 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Akinrinade

Description: This course is an interdisciplinary examination of the origins, course, and aftermath of the Nazi Holocaust. It will situate the Holocaust within the context of World War II and the multiple genocides that occurred around the world in the twentieth century. The class traces the development of Nazism, and discusses the causes, progression and development of the onslaught against the Jews and Nazi efforts to eliminate other groups across borders and nationalities deemed to be a threat to German racial superiority. The class will pay attention to the ways in which Jews and other targeted groups responded to the crisis. It will also examine survivor accounts (including the impact on children of the victims and perpetrators), and issues of memorialization, politicization, representation, and sacralization of the Nazi Holocaust. At the end of the course, students will have attained a thorough, nuanced and interdisciplinary understanding, as well as the international context of the Holocaust. Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will take account of regular attendance, evidence of critical reading, engagement in class discussion, the quality of short reactions, and two essays.There will be no course credit for anyone who misses three (3) classes in the quarter. Text: WAR AND GENOCIDE: A CONCISE HISTORY OF THE HOLOCAUST: by Bergen, Doris,(3rd ed., 2016); Various readings assigned through Canvas

FAIR 336B Peace Corps Experience Society and Individual 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Helling

The Peace Corps Experience Course Description Begun in 1961, the Peace Corps is widely hailed as a successful program. As a federal institution, it is unique in its operation because it only allows a maximum of five years of service from its employees. Joseph H. Blatchford, Peace Corps Director, 1969-1971, claimed: The Peace Corps is respected in this country because Volunteers have sacrificed comfort and consumption to do a job in the developing world; because this country respects adventure, voluntary spirit, and the desire to help others. The Peace Corps is respected abroad because volunteers have often done the different jobs no one else was able or willing to do; because Volunteers have filled needs for trained manpower at critical times. Moreover, the Peace Corps comes without strings or ulterior motive, separate from American foreign policy, with no other purpose than to help where needed. Throughout this course we will examine and test the assumptions in Blatchford's statement. What does it mean to go into another country and culture to "help?" Is it possible for the thousands of Peace Corps Volunteers (PCV) to go to another place without "ulterior motive?"

Are Volunteers "guests" or "helpers" and what is the difference? What is one's duty to society and to oneself, and how does one navigate conflicting values of race, gender, sexual orientation, religion and wealth in light of this duty? There is now a wealth of literature written by RPCVs (Returned Peace Corps Volunteers) about their Peace Corps experiences. As the instructor served as a PCV in Niger, West Africa, 1988-1990, some of the readings will focus on West Africa. TEXTS: Articles as assigned Monique and the Mango Rains: Two Years with a Midwife in Mali, Kris Holloway When the World Calls: The Inside Story of the Peace Corps and Its First Fifty Years, Stanley Meisler Pat Alter (editor) series: 50 Years of Amazing Peace Corps Stories: Volume Two, Gather the Fruit One by One (The Americas) Book of your choice written about Peace Corps service Attendance and Assignment Requirements Attendance is important in this class; you will not get credit if you have more than 3 absences. Assignments are due at the start of the class period. **Also, we will be working on a Service-Learning Project, so expect to spend some hours outside of class on this project. Timely and thoughtful completion of short papers on each book; active and informed participation; 6-8 page, typed research paper and oral presentation on country of Peace Corps service after interviewing Returned Peace Corps Volunteers and reading a book on that country.

Learning Objectives: -Identify common narratives of the Peace Corps and complicate those views -Learn about the history of the Peace Corps -Consider what "success" might look like in international development work--who measures it? How is it measured? --Improve oral presentation skills --Improve academic research and writing skills --Reflect on what it means to travel to other communities and places

FAIR 336B Psychology of Race & Racism Society and Individual 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Haizlip

Psychology is the study of human motivation, how human beings perceive themselves and others, how human beings behave, and how human beings change. This class will focus on psychological issues in the context of the African American community and Black experience. We begin the course with an overview of Black/African American psychology as an evolving field of study and consider the Black/African American Psychology paradigm as one of the key conceptual frameworks for understanding the psychological experiences of African Americans. In the second part of the course, we explore a range of topics that pertain to the psychological experiences of African Americans such as racism and discrimination, achievement and schooling, kinship and family, racial identity, religion and spirituality, and African American mental health. A focus of the course is the range of theoretical and methodological approaches that scholars have developed to conceptualize the thoughts, styles, and behaviors of African Americans. Finally, we conclude the course with discussions of current topics, controversies, and recent advances in African American psychology. Throughout the course, a primary objective will be to consider how our knowledge of African American psychological experiences can be used to promote African American psychological health and wellness. In order to fully reflect upon privileges that are afforded as a result of social and cultural positionality, we must also deepen our empathy towards individuals and communities that experience various forms of disadvantage as a result of being the "other". Otherism is the overarching term that describes various prejudices (i.e., racism, classism, sexism, ageism, etc.) and the experience of being different, odd, weird, and an outsider in various social contexts and settings. Upon completion of this course students will: --Demonstrate knowledge of the historical roots of psychology from an African centered perspective and be able to identify the development of Black Psychology as a distinct system of psychological thought and research. --Display knowledge of the African centered world views and its role in the psychological study of people of African descent. --Demonstrate an understanding of how the "Lived Black Experience" can aid in the overall understanding of the Black experience and provide a frame of reference for which to study the psychological experience of other people throughout the world. --Explore his or her world views as it relates to their personal psychological and social experiences.

EVALUATION/ASSESSMENT: This course will use a combination of didactic discourse, consciousness raising seminars, audiovisual literature, and extensive discussion focusing on the historical and cultural representation of psychology from an "othering" centered perspective. Recommended Readings: Parham, Thomas A., Ajamu, Adisa and White, Joseph, L,. (2011).The Psychology of Blacks: Centering Our Perspective In African Consciousness. Forth Edition, Prentice Hall Wright, Bobby, E. (1984). The Psychopathic Racial Personality and Other Essays: Third World Press, Chicago (Book Provided by Instructor). Optional Readings: Russell, Kathy, Wilson, Midge, and Hall, Ronald, (1993). The Color Complex: The Politics of Skin Color Among African- Americans. Anchor Books Division of Random House, Inc. New York

FAIR 336B Neoliberalism & Public School Society and Individual 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Pierce

Neoliberalism and the Public School Neoliberalism is an economic and social model of governance rooted in the idea that society is best organized under the rule of radical free markets. This course examines and charts the rise of neoliberal driven school reform in the U.S. Special focus will be given to how free market school reform models treat ongoing racial and economic injustice in the U.S. Case study examples of New Orleans, Chicago, and Washington DC will be used to analyze the results of corporate education governance. Both a theoretical and historical approach will be taken to evaluate the claims made by neoliberal education reform proponents for achieving racial and economic equity through public education. Students will also be asked to analyze and present reflection projects on the recent Washington State Charter School Initiative (Proposition 1240) as well as community responses such as the "opt out" movement. Learning Outcomes: Define and understand the principal assumptions of neoliberal economic and social policy; Identify consequences of neoliberal education reform policies in major U.S. cities; Evaluate the claims of equity and justice made by proponents of neoliberal education reformers; Apply course knowledge to construct arguments for what a racially and economic just public education system should include Credit and Evaluation: Participation in class discussion and regular attendance; Timely and thoughtful completion of course readings and writing assignments; quality of writing assignments that use evidence from course readings; quality of reflection projects; critical and respectful engagement in class Required Texts: 1.) Naomi Kline, The Shock Doctrine. 2.) Kenneth Saltman, The Failure of Corporate School Reform. 3.) Pauline Lipman, The New Political Economy of Urban Education: Neoliberalism, Race, and the Right of the City

FAIR 336B Women of Color United States Society and Individual 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Takagi

Women of Color in the United States This class explores the history and experience of women of color in the United States. Prior classwork in U.S. history, women's studies, or American Cultural studies is essential for this class. This is because we will spend some of our time exploring how oppressions based on race, class, gender, and sexuality intersect or are interconnected in the lives of Asian, Black, Latina, and Native American women. In addition, we will closely examine is the dialectics of women's oppression. Women of color experience oppression in different ways and have created different forms of resistance based on their group's historical experience, culture, access to education and finance, and methods of political organizing. Another theme will focus on coalition building across ethnic and racial lines that go beyond--in the words of June Jordan--"getting the monsters off our backs." The goal of the course is to look at past and present concerns and tactics that will help all women--of any color--to take pride, to take strength, and to take stock for the future.

Required Readings: Possible texts include: This Bridge Called My Back, Fourth Edition: Writings by Radical Women of Color. This Bridge We Call Home, edited by Gloria Anzaldua and Analouise Keating. Colonize This! Young Women of Color on Today's Feminism, edited by Daisy Hernandez and Bushra Rehman. Articles on-line and on Canvas Written Requirements: 3 (5 page) papers. Other Requirements Regular, punctual attendance. Collaborative, oral presentations Informed participation in class discussions. Work collaboratively with other students

 

FAIR 336B Dysfunctional Family Society and Individual 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Haizlip

The nuances of our family dynamics play an important role in understanding how we behave in other relationships and in our community. While we may not give it much attention, our concept of family has a great impact on individual and social psychology. As societies perception of family continues to grow and evolve, this course aims to normalize dysfunctional dynamics in all families, as well as differentiate between "Dysfunction and Abuse".

Abuse is characterized by a person subjecting, or exposing, another person to behavior that may result in psychological trauma, including anxiety, chronic depression, or post-traumatic stress disorder. This course focuses on problems which emerge as a result of varying parenting practices and family constellation dynamics specifically. The course addresses a broad spectrum of issues including the definition of dysfunctional families, the factors which cause child maltreatment, families with substance abusing parent (alcohol, drugs, etc.), emotional abuse, physical abuse, financial abuse, sexual abuse, and treatment and prevention. We will also expand the topic into the investigation of abuse towards animals, looking at theoretical perspectives of the abused, as well as the abuser. As a result of the psychological trauma caused by abuse, the course will further investigate how victims of abuse cope, heal, and survive after experiencing abuse.

Evaluation/Assessment: Students will participate in deeply personal reflective activities, growth groups, and academic debates. Evaluation and assessment will rely heavily on class participation, reflective journaling, and social learning projects.

Essential Readings: Brown, L. (2008). Cultural Competence in Trauma Therapy: Beyond the Flashback. American Psychological Association.

Drozdek, B & Wilson, J. (Eds) (2007). Voices of Trauma: Treating Survivors Across Cultures. Springer. Van der Kolk, B.A., McFarlane, A.C., and Weisaeth, L., (Eds.) (2007). Traumatic Stress: The Effect of Overwhelming Experience on Mind, Body, and Society. Guilford Press: New York.

FAIR 336N Global Food Sovereignty Science and Our Place on the Planet 2

Credits: 4

Global Food Sovereignty: Food sovereignty is the right of people to define their own food systems. We will examine and define the concept of food sovereignty within a regional and global context, emphasizing food access, food security, agroecology, and social justice issues. The class will also study the US Farm Bill as well as international food policies and organizations that influence food system organization and operations. Students will discuss and reflect on texts and related articles from several contemporary food sovereignty thinkers and activists and guest speakers will be engaged in local food issues. We will also focus specifically on Pacific Northwest food traditions and the role of cultural identity and health in current food sovereignty efforts. In the third section of this course, students will be asked to investigate food sovereignty in their own lives and present this experiential learning and reflection to the class. Required Texts: --Formerly Known as Food by Kristin Lawless --Food and Society by Amy Guptill, Denise Copelton, Betsy Lucal --Seed Sovereignty, Food Security by Vandana Shiva (Ed) --The Third Plate by Dan Barber Additional Readings will be provided on CANVAS Canvas Learning Outcomes: Define food sovereignty --Apply ecological and social concepts to global food systems --Identify food access, security and justice issues on regional and global levels --Evaluate the impact of farm policy on food availability and production --Determine and recognize Pacific Northwest traditional foods and their social and economic relevance Evaluation: Participation in class discussions and field trips, timely completion of readings, completion of i) weekly response papers and a ii) final independent project

FAIR 336N Brain Science Science and Our Place on the Planet 2

Credits: 5

Brain Science What is going on in our brain as we go through our daily tasks? How does our brain change throughout our life? How and when do our brains differ from one another? What effect does stress and environmental elementa have on our brain? Is the brain hardwired for morality? What part of the brain promotes a sense of self? Or spirituality? Participants will discover answers to these and other questions in this exploration of brain structures and functions and correlating behavior patterns. We will examine the mechanisms of thinking, learning, planning and emotions. Through current neuroscience understanding, we will learn about the essential chemical messengers that communicate within the brain and body. We will discover how our environment, diseases and disorders affect our brain. We will find out how neuroplasticity allows us to change and compensate for alterations in our brain and body systems. Throughout the quarter we will investigate essentials of brain health. Students can expect to learn through presentations, discussions, reading/media and interactive instructional strategies that promote active student involvement using brain-based learning methodologies. Learning outcomes are that students will be able to: -identify brain structures and their functions -understand primary chemical brain messengers and the functions they fulfill for human behavior, actions and emotions -learn how disorders and disease affect the brain/body -recognize how differences in brain structures and chemistry manifest and how neuroplasticity adapts the brain to changes. Course Materials: Readings from a current neuroscience text and related book chapters plus assignments from The Anatomy of the Human Brain by John P.J. Pinel. In-class and assigned videos / podcasts. Credit/Evaluation: This course requires active participation in class and full attendance as well as completion of periodic responses to readings/media and individual research with a class presentation.

FAIR 336V Experimental Drawing Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Feodorov

Experimental Drawing (Please note that this is a 300-level studio art course. Prior experience in drawing and two-dimensional art-making is encouraged since the course assumes students have already developed some basic drawing skills.) Description: With the invention of the camera, the need for an art that duplicated perceived reality began to wane. Artists began to experiment with what lay behind the visual assumptions of so-called reality. As society changed, they believed that art too must change, and the perpetuation of traditional realist techniques was no longer valid in the age of the airplane, audio recording and moving pictures. In this course students will explore experimental drawing techniques, the use of new and non-traditional materials, and focus on the development of concept and context as part of their art-making process. Students will begin through the analyzation and abstraction of forms, experimenting with color, composition, and implying depth and movement, while also re-thinking the "realist" tradition of Western art and questioning what we visually assume to be reality. As the quarter progresses, students will be expected to combine their art-making with their ideas, questions and concerns about the world. Students will also be introduced to works by numerous artists who have been instrumental in the development of abstract and non-representational art, as well as contemporary artists whose work addresses the world through more conceptual means. Credit and Evaluation: Students will complete at least 5 artworks in class and 5 artworks outside of class. They will also turn in a sketchbook of at least 40-pages and participate in workshops and class discussions. Evaluation will be based upon attendance, informed participation in discussions, and demonstrated commitment and engagement with their projects. No text is required. However, students must provide a large 18 x 24 inch drawing pad (no newsprint!), and various drawing materials (to be specified later), and a sketchbook no smaller than 9 x 12 inches. A materials list will be provided at least a week before classes begin.

FAIR 343U Embodied Agency

Credits: 4

Instructor: Nichols

We are Homo sapiens sapiens, which is Latin for wise or knowing person. As humans we have named ourselves after our capacity for reflective awareness. We are aware that we are aware, and within this awareness we must act and choose. This course follows two major concepts, embodiment and agency, to explore how they work together to create and guide our movement through the world. We will utilize the literature of embodiment and agency to bolster our conceptual understanding of choice and movement in the context of self, culture, race, class, and gender. In particular, we will seek to understand movement and agency as key concepts for constructing one's sense of identity, and for articulating one's experiences. This course will also be an opportunity to develop our natural and innate capacities for reflective awareness through mindfulness and somatic-based practices. Among the questions we will ask in this course are: What is my work--not my job, but the work that creatively inspires me? Where do my actions originate? How does my attention affect my choices? How can each of us embody our purpose, values, and passions, and make choices (agency) to bring about a shift in the social body and--hopefully--influence the world stage? What is the creative manifestation of our unique visions and how do we embody them? How does the body provide valuable forms of information beyond cognition that can guide our agency? How do we develop agency that is inspired, purposeful and in service to the common good? Required Text: Embodiment and Agency, by Sue Campbell and Letitia Maynell. Additional readings will be made available on Canvas. Credit and Evaluation:?Informed and regular discussion, participation in experiential learning, and regular attendance. Students will also be responsible for keeping a weekly journal, preparing bi-weekly reading questions, writing four papers, and a final class presentation on agency.

FAIR 351W Printmaking Narratives Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: S'eiltin

Description: This intermediate printmaking class is designed for students who wish to refine their printmaking skills through the creation of images that represent stories or themes. The depiction of fiction, fantasies and truths will be realized in a variety of printing methods such as relief and woodcut prints, reduction prints and dry point. Students will also have the option to refine one printing technique and focus on one story or theme throughout the entire quarter. Recommended Text: Ross, Romano, Ross: THE COMPLETE PRINTMAKER Requirements: A total of 40 prints: the final print portfolio may represent a variety of printmaking techniques and styles, or may represent one or two techniques only.

A sketchbook/journal is essential in this class and should be used during demonstrations and for each major assignment. We will review sketchbooks throughout the quarter. At the end of the quarter the sketchbook should be filled. Sketches and studies must represent the evolution of creative ideas. Attendance: Attendance is crucial in learning the various techniques presented during demonstrations and workshops. It is of the utmost importance that students attend all demonstrations and critiques. Attendance will be closely monitored. Credit/Evaluation: The class and instructor will critique prints every two weeks. The final evaluation is based on the student's completion of all assignments, participation in workshops and critiques and attendance. Students will be encouraged to break creative boundaries, to take risks and to produce technically skilled prints that reflect the development of a personal style and the ability to visually render a story or theme.

FAIR 364 World Music and Culture Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Sehman

World Music and Culture This course examines various music traditions of the world, along with their many surrounding cultural contexts. The study of specific musical styles and traits will be accompanied by an examination of how individuals and cultures make that music meaningful in their lives, including: culturally specific conceptions, aesthetics, and definitions of music; specific functions of music in culture; music as a tool for individual and cultural identity; the process of musical composition and transmission; methods of teaching and learning; social status and roles of music makers; globalization, diaspora and their effect on music traditions. Specific music cultures studied will include? --South Indian Carnatic classical music --Indian Bollywood film music? --Javanese and Balinese gamelan? --Indonesian puppet theatre (Wayang kulit) --West African Mande storytelling music --Shona mbira music of Zimbabwe This course will also provide an overview of ethnomusicology, the academic field involving the study of music in culture. Topics will include: Standard research methods and goals; the ethics and power structures of fieldwork; objectivity and subjectivity in the field; methods of documenting music; the individual performer/performance as representative (or not) of the whole. --All students are welcome to participate in this course; No experience with technical music making is required.

Texts: Titon, Jeff Todd, editor. Worlds of Music. 5th ed., Schirmer Cengage, 2009. Wade, Bonnie C. Thinking Musically. 3rd ed., Oxford University Press, 2013. Requirements/Evaluation: Students will be expected to complete all reading and listening assignments, and actively participate in class discussions. Each student will present a reading/listening and lead class discussion at least once during the quarter. There will be short written reflections based on reading and listening assignments. Students will complete a research project on a topic of their choosing.

 

FAIR 370I Introduction to Pro Tools

Credits: 4

Instructor: Wallace

Prerequisites: 270H (before or during) or permission of instructor This class will introduce students to mixing and editing audio with Avid's Pro Tools 12 software. Covered topics will include: importing and recording audio into Pro Tools, editing and manipulating performances, MIDI, the use of plug-ins, and an overview of mixing processes such as compression/limiting, dithering and equalization. As this is primarily a mixing class, having already recorded material is useful but not required. Students will be expected to attend class regularly and demonstrate critical listening skills through critique of their classmates' work. Additionally, the Fairhaven Mixing Suite will be available for use all quarter and required for certain projects. Texts: Reprinted materials. Credit/Evaluation: Projects will be evaluated throughout the quarter by the instructor and the other members of the class.

FAIR 370J Studio Recording

Credits: 4

Instructor: Fish

Prerequisite: FAIR 370I or FAIR 370P Studio Recording I takes the concepts introduced in Intro to Audio and Intro to Pro Tools and allows the student to apply and practice them in a hands-on manner, with the goal of becoming familiar with and competent in the use of the equipment in the Champion St Studio. Students will complete at least four multi-track recording projects and will have the opportunity to work on other recording sessions as well. Through the students' work on these projects they will learn efficiency and speed in the techniques of tracking, overdubbing, and mixdown sessions. The recording projects will be evaluated by the instructor as well as the other students in the class. This course will also involve development of critical listening skills as well as the creative and imaginative expression possible in audio recording. Students will keep a detailed journal of their session work. This is a Pro Tools based course and enrolled students will gain access to the Fairhaven Studio, Mixing Suite, and Champion St Studios. Texts: The Recording Engineer's handbook (3rd edition) by Owsinski Credit/Evaluation: Each student must finish the assigned projects which will be critiqued by the instructor and peers based on sound quality, balance, clarity and realization. Overall evaluation will be made based on effort, participation and growth as an engineer.

FAIR 370K Advanced Studio Recording

Credits: 4

Instructor: Fish

Prerequisite: FAIR 370J or FAIR 370H This class will give students with advanced recording experience the opportunity to record and mix on an industry standard Pro Tools 12 HD system. Students will enhance their knowledge of Pro Tools and learn how to use this software in conjunction with a large-format analog mixing console. Topics such as drum sample replacement, audio quantization, convolution impulse responses, spectrum analysis, DSP processing and other advanced topics will be covered. Students will be expected to conduct at least three recording/mixing sessions throughout the quarter and prepare a final portfolio for in-class critique. Students will also learn how to properly configure Pro Tools HD hardware and software components, how to setup session templates and how to utilize each component of an HD/analog system. Enrolled students will gain access to the Fairhaven Studio, Mixing Suite, and Champion St Studios. Texts: Reprinted materials Credit/Evaluation: Projects will be evaluated throughout the quarter by the instructor and the other

FAIR 381G American Indian Novels Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Rowe

Topic: American Indian Novels This course explores the surprising entry of American Indian novels into American literature. Through reviews and essays we will briefly survey novels from the middle and late twentieth century that have become the canon of the genre. Then we will read novels from what Dean Rader describes as post-renaissance literature. Many of these works written since 2000 revise the pan-Indian themes of many earlier works and respond to a Native nationalism or present, as LeAnne Howe describes, a "tribalography." In addition to the theme of nationalism, we will pay particular attention to how the novelists use issues of gender and sexual identity to critique settler state colonialism, patriarchy, and oppression. Texts: King, Thomas. The Truth About Stories. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2005; Erdrich, Louise. The Last Report on the Miracles at Little No Horse. New York: HarperCollins, 2000; Silko, Leslie Marmon. Gardens in the Dunes. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2000; Earling, Debra Magpie. Perma Red. New York: BlueHen, 2002; and Treuer, David. The Translation of Dr. Appeles: A Love Story. St. Paul, MN: Graywolf, 2006. Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will be based on consistent attendance, prepared and active participation in class discussions, and quality of written work. Assignments will include short, 500-750 word review essays on each novel, and a final 1500-2000 word thematic paper.

FAIR 381G Borders&Crossings Lit&Practice Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Friedland

Borders and Crossings--A Study in Literature and Practice A literature in practice situates students at the crossroads of lived experiences and social realities in which narratives are created. The goal is to make pertinent connections between literary production and its context beyond the page to which a deep reading of any world compels us towards. In this course, we will study borders, both a political reality and an imaginative construct - an organizing principle that allows for a holistic approach to the course's guiding question: what does it mean to be a crosser of borders? In order to answer this question in its widest sense, we will operate in an intermediate space between academic discipline and community engagement, research and creative practice. This course readings will reflect literature produced at local, national and international borders, translation practices, documentary poetics, diaspora narratives and aesthetics, as well as ethical considerations when working with or writing about migrant and refugee communities. During our in-class sessions, we will integrate the study of border and migration themed literature with weekly visits from faculty, community organizations and activists. The course is linked to three World Issues Forum speakers and multiple field trips. Evaluation: active participation during our in-class discussions and peer review sessions; timely submission of drafts, participation in field trips, keeping a journal and make pertinent links between texts and practical experiences in the field, submit a final portfolio of writings. Required Readings: Tell Me How It Ends by Valeria Luiselli Unaccompanied by Javier Zamora Antigona Gonzales by Sara Uribe (Transl. John Pluecker) The Brothers by Masha Gessen Learning Objectives: --Increase awareness of and engagement in local border issues. --Hone writing skills in multiple genre forms: essays, interviews, poetry, field reports. --Foster collaborative learning spaces across campuses and disciplines. --Engage in critical discussions, comparative understandings, and interdisciplinary methods for addressing border issues. --Develop new critical and creative interventions that add to the dynamic archive of border processes. --Read major and minor works of contemporary border literature.

 

FAIR 393B Rights,Liberties,Justice in Am Society and Individual 2

Credits: 4

This class is a Constitutional Law class. We will read the Federalist papers and the Magna Carta to understand the beginnings of our legal system. We will dissect the US Constitution and learn its structure, federal powers, individual liberty, Due Process and Equal Protection clauses, first amendment speech, religion, and privacy. In the process we will discuss contemporary issues and cases as they are informed by prior cases. Required Texts: Constitutional Law: Principles and Policies, Third Edition. Chemerinsky Selected Federalist Papers. Dover Thrift Editions 2001. Alexander Hamilton and James Madison.

FAIR 403A Advanced Seminar Required Core

Credits: 4

Instructor: Akinrinade

Description: This course, in your final quarter at Fairhaven College, provides an opportunity for reflection on your education. The class provides a supportive community for the summary and critical reflection process, whether you pursued a WWU major or a Fairhaven concentration. The final output will be a Summary and Evaluation (S & E) of your Fairhaven education. Through this S & E, you will reflect on your educational choices and their consequences, identify unifying trends, articulate the meaning of significant ideas and experiences, and note the gaps that remain. The course offers time to look forward, consider possibilities and challenges of your chosen community and/or occupation, and to examine questions of social responsibility and activism in relation to your education and future aspirations. This course is a collaborative effort, involving intensive writing, continuous conversation, presentations and active listening to each other. Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will take account of regular attendance, engagement in class discussions and active collaboration in the Summary and Evaluation writing process, and a Summary and Evaluation document submitted at the end of the quarter. There will be no course credit for anyone who misses three (3) classes in the quarter. Text: HILBERG, RAUL: THE POLITICS OF MEMORY: THE JOURNEY OF A HOLOCAUST HISTORIAN (1996)

FAIR 414D Topic Social Justice Education Society and Individual 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Calderon

Topics in Social Justice Education This course explores key themes and ideas that have been developed within the area of study referenced as Critical Indigenous studies. Collectively, concepts of sovereignty, Indigenous self-determination, epistemology/ways of being, amongst others, are explored in relationship to the nation-state, citizenship, and empire. Some of the major contributions by Indigenous scholars we will cover include settler colonialism, Native feminisims, by scholars such as Jodi Byrd, Dolores Calderўn, Glen Coulthard, Sarah Deer, David Gegeo, Daniel Justice, Audra Simpson, Leann Simpson, Linda Tuhiwai Smith, Kim TallBear, Margo Tamez, and Eve Tuck.

Selected readings will be available on the course Canvas site. Credit/Evaluation: Regular attendance, engaged/active participation in all class exercises, engagement in class discussion, strong evidence of reading, quality performance on assignments throughout the quarter, quality of writing.

FAIR 422K Advanced Legal Writing Society and Individual 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Helling

Advanced Legal Writing and Analysis Prerequisite: SENIOR standing and FAIR 311B American Legal System or PLSC 311 or Instructor Permission This class is the capstone course for the Law, Diversity and Justice concentration and minor. You should take it in your SENIOR year. Please do NOT take it if you do not have the prerequisites. You will build on the legal analysis skills gained in previous legal seminars by writing a polished, ten-page appellate brief on a current legal issue. You will be assigned to argue one side of a case pending before the U.S. Supreme Court. At the end of the quarter, you will engage in an oral argument about your case to a panel of three attorneys who will question you (hopefully in the Whatcom County Courthouse). Required Text: Bryan A. Garner, The Winning Brief (3rd edition) Evaluation/Credit: No more than THREE absences. Informed participation in class discussion by keeping up with the reading load and doing the assigned exercises in the textbook. Successful completion of case briefs of relevant cases and the creation of a Cases Notebook. Successful completion of the appellate brief in proper citation format BY THE DEADLINE. Successful oral argument in the Moot Court. Learning Objectives:

--Review of legal vocabulary, role and hierarchy of trial and appellate courts, and the importance of the judicial system in government --Review of the sources and hierarchy of law, including the role of precedent and statutory construction --Review of basic legal research techniques --Continued practice with writing case briefs --Emphasis on legal reasoning--the synthesis of case law --Strengthen argument writing skills through the creation of an appellate brief --Strengthen oral advocacy skills through argument in a Moot Court

FAIR 440N Ethnoecology Science and Our Place on the Planet 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Tuxill

Ethnoecology is the study of conceptions of ecological relationships and the natural world held by different peoples and cultures. In this course we employ ethnoecology to explore the role of traditional ecological knowledge--also called indigenous or local knowledge--in maintaining and restoring healthy ecological relationships between communities and the environment. We begin by comparing local ways of knowing with western science, identifying the epistemological strengths and challenges of each. Using a case study approach, we then explore how ethnoecology is conceptualized, systematized, and helps guide the management of landscapes and biota by rural, indigenous, and folk communities in many different contexts worldwide. Students will examine how traditional ecological knowledge based on a profound and active engagement with place can lead to a rethinking of conventional approaches to environmental conservation and rural development.

Texts: SACRED ECOLOGY: TRADITIONAL ECOLOGICAL KNOWLEDGE AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT by F. Berkes; ZAPOTEC SCIENCE: FARMING AND FOOD IN THE NORTHERN SIERRA OF OAXACA by R.J. Gonzalez; and THE SHEPHERD'S LIFE: MODERN DISPATCHES FROM AN ANCIENT LANDSCAPE by J. Rebanks. Additional reading assignments on Canvas.

Credit/evaluation: Regular attendance and informed contribution to class discussions is the foundation of this course. Evaluation will be based on each student's grasp and understanding of the concepts and issues presented in the readings. Students also will: 1) prepare an oral presentation on a case study of traditional ecological knowledge and its application; and 2) complete a final take-home essay evaluation.