Courses

Fairhaven College Course Descriptions

Below you will find our current course descriptions.  Previous quarter course descriptions are also available by selecting the quarter and year you are searching for.  Electronic course descriptions are available back to winter 2009.  For information on days and times as well as location please visit Classfinder.  To register for these classes log into Web4U. Important information about registration including deadlines and fees can be found on the Registrar's Office page.  For any questions about these course descriptions or for assistance with registration please call the Fairhaven College Office at 360-650-6680. For information on Fairhaven College Wait List Policies click here.

Fairhaven College Core Requirements:

Classes determined to satisfy a Fairhaven Core requirement will be identified using the following icons: 

Letter CRequired Core Music Note Humanities and the Expressive Arts II
Leaf iconScience and Our Place on the Planet II Human iconSociety and Individual II

Non-Fairhaven Students

Most Fairhaven classes open to all WWU students who meet the prerequisites in Phase II of registration.

FAIR 101A Intro Interdisciplinary Study Required Core

Credits: 1

Instructor: Blick

This class aims to introduce students to Fairhaven College resources, practices, processes and possibilities in their first quarter of enrollment in our program. Our class activities will include small group workshops, introductions to Fairhaven resources and people, community-based activities and individual advising. We will introduce the educational practices used at Fairhaven (Writing Portfolio; Transition Conference; Independent Study, Interdisciplinary Concentration, Narrative Evaluations...) and share the essentials you need to proceed toward your chosen major and take charge of your education. Texts: There are no textbooks. Course materials provided in class and on Canvas. Credit/Evaluation: This Fairhaven College Core Class is a graduation requirement. Award of credit will be based on documented attendance, participation and completion of assignments as indicated in the class syllabus. Bring your your curiosity, your questions and your active engagement. The learning outcomes for FAIR 101a include understanding resources, degree pathways, requirements and pedagogy that are the mission and practice at Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies

FAIR 201A Critical & Reflective Inquiry Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Sehman

Theme: Keywords in Sound 5 Credits While music is possibly the most obvious example of sound in many of our lives, this course will use that as a jumping off point, to consider sound as a broad cultural and theoretical phenomenon. We will use a keywords approach (taken from the title of one of our texts) as the basis for an examination of sound. For example: Space (how does sound define the [public / private] space we inhabit?); Noise (as metaphor; as a form of power); Voice (as a form of communication; a source of identity, agency; an instrument; a tool for resistance). A fundamental goal of this course is for students to interrogate the ways they conceptualize and interact with sound, both in their individual lives, and as a lived culture. In short, to denaturalize that which is often ubiquitous.

Critical and Reflective Inquiry will achieve the above through a deep focus on: *Reading: Course reading will involve academic texts examining theoretical issues of sound, from the emerging field of Sound Studies. It will also include writing by musicians and music journalists. And lastly, we will read some creative fiction with sound as its subject. *Writing will include: brief reflection essays on readings and other prompts; one research project; one personal reflection essay/creative project which examines sound in your life. *Seminar skills will focus on the art of discussion, listening, and class community building. Texts: Novak, David and Matt Sakakeeny, editors. Keywords in Sound. Duke University Press, 2015. Hopper, Jessica. The First Collection of Criticism by a Living Female Rock Critic. Featherproof Books, 2015. Graff, Gerald and Cathy Birkenstein. They Say / I Say: The Moves That Matter in Academic Writing. 4th ed., W. W. Norton, 2018.

FAIR 201A Critical & Reflective Inquiry Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Takagi

Theme: Journeys In this section we will explore the different kinds of journeys Americans have been taking over the centuries, and how they make sense of those life travels, through texts, films and through class discussion. In addition, we will embark on an intellectual journey, which will include developing and honing the skills, tools and knowledge to be a strong student and a productive, responsible member of the larger community. For each class member, this part of the journey will include identifying and analyzing one's voice and the privileges and burdens built into that voice, identifying and analyzing others' voices and building respect for those diverse perspectives, and to critically assess all forms of information (oral, written and visual). The main skill emphasized in this class will be writing. During the quarter you will sharpen and hone your writing skills. You will learn to construct an argument, gather evidence, shape your thesis to fit the audience, and organize your thoughts. In addition, you will also learn to seminar, peer edit papers, and critically analyze materials. Finally, you will learn to research and write a 6-8 page research paper with a minimum of 4 sources, proper citations and a bibliography.

Required Reading Readings on Canvas and on-line through library database Additional requirements: Regular attendance. 2 absences will reflect negatively on your evaluation. 3 absences and you will not receive credit for the class. If there is a personal/family difficulty, please let me know as soon as possible. Active participation in class and small group discussions. If you are uncomfortable with speaking in front of people, please see me as soon as possible. Peer editing of writing plan. Paper requirements: One biographical journey paper (2-3 pages, double-spaced) + proper citation. One reflection paper (2 pages, double-spaced) + proper citation. One research paper topic (1 page, double-spaced).

FAIR 202A Core: Humanities/Express Arts Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Feodorov

Description: Throughout history, art has both adorned and justified the lifestyles of the rich and famous. From huge idealized statues of rulers to the often frilly paintings of 18th Century French Rococo, art has both pandered to and titillated the upper classes. However, it is a rash over-simplification to dismiss the entire history of Art as only catering to the tastes of the wealthy and powerful. In this combination seminar and studio class, we will not only investigate how art has been complicit with power, but also how artists and theorists both create and advocate for art that critiques and resists power, voices their experiences and identities, promotes and supports social change, and envisions alternative futures. Students will create 3 visual art projects based upon the themes discussed in class, write response papers to required readings and actively participate in class discussions. Students will also give a presentation in class on an artist whose work fits within the theme of the course. Credit and Evaluation: Evaluation will be based upon regular and attentive attendance, timely and thoughtful completion of all assignments, informed and consistent participation in class discussions, and demonstrated commitment and engagement with their projects. More than three unexcused absences will result in no credit being awarded. No text is required. However, required readings will be made available on Canvas or online. Depending on your project ideas, you may need to invest in some art supplies outside of the minimal amount available in the art room.

FAIR 203A Social Relationshp/Responsibil Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: O Murchu

Overview The seminar will trace the origins of enlightenment ideas that "men" are born free and equal. We will examine how radical those ideas were in the context of their times, and how they provided a basis for limiting the power of the state and the church to intervene in propertied men's lives. We will then examine how the universalist ideals of the liberal enlightenment implicitly or explicitly excluded those without property, people of color, and women. We examine how workers' movements and thinkers, and African American thinkers, challenged, expanded, and deepened liberal conceptions of freedom and equality. Empirically, we examine the feminist struggle against mass incarceration and the question of whether the United States is a democracy even narrowly understood. We ask what changes it would take to make America a democracy with equal citizenship for workers, women, and people of color, and the democratic rights of non-citizens. My approach to teaching this course is that I will learn at least as much about our shared subject matter from you, my students, and our shared learning community, as any one of you will learn from me. The shared questions that we are all confronting in this course focus on the questions of what social justice requires and whether we can make the American social order (more) just. These questions are real, challenging and interesting for us and we hope that you will join us in the hard, but rewarding, struggle of thinking about these questions.

Course Learning Goals -To begin to build a set of philosophical and theoretical concepts for understanding the contemporary social world and its historical foundations -To learn how to read dense texts and practice expository writing including direct citation, paraphrasing, and summarizing -To reflect critically on ideas of Social Justice and the Fairhaven Mission's commitments to justice and diversity -To have fun with ideas Texts: Most course readings are available on Canvas. Three books have been ordered by the University bookstore: -Martin Luther King, Where Do We Go from Here?: Chaos or Community (Boston: Beacon, 2010) -Steven Levitsky and Daniel Ziblatt, How Democracies Die (NY: Crown, 2018) -Emily Thuma, All Our Trials: Prisons, Policing, and the Feminist Fight to End Violence (Urbana: University of Illinois, 2019)

FAIR 203A Social Relationshp/Responsibil Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Miyake

Theme: Whiteness Studies Through this course, students will examine both the history of the representation of race and whiteness in the United States and Western Europe and also the ways in which such representations have been shaped by cultural, political, historical, social, and economic forces and contexts in political and economic structures, academia, the mass media, and popular culture. Students will examine a wide range of works related to this increasingly established field of inquiry regarding these issues from the fields of anthropology, history, sociology, political science, and cultural studies. These readings and class discussions will emphasize the ways in which multiple discourses from each of these different fields of study have impacted each other and worked both in unison and tension to influence the ways in which the study and concepts of race and whiteness have been perceived and portrayed over the past several centuries.

FAIR 206A Core:Science/Our Plc on Planet Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Schwandt

Fair 206A: Population, Health, and the Environment Course Description: Exploring Malthus' premise through a lens two centuries later, students in this course will learn the primary factors influencing population growth: births, deaths, and migration, and apply this knowledge to understand global population dynamics. Topics will include the demographic transition, the youth demographic gift, population aging, rapid urbanization, and the effect of HIV/AIDS on population growth. Links between population, health, and the environment will be emphasized throughout the course, such as the effect of rapid population growth, especially urbanization, on environmental degradation, as well as the effects of environmental degradation on human survival.

Text: Laurie Mazur, A Pivotal Moment: Population, Justice and the Environmental Challenge (Washington DC: Island Press, 2010)

Requirements for Credit and Criteria for Evaluation: Students will be evaluated on their attendance, preparation for, via reading reflections, and participation in course discussions as well as one group research project, presentation, and paper (2,000 word minimum) on a group designed population, health, and/or environment research question of the group's choice.

FAIR 215F The Asian American Experience

Credits: 4

Instructor: Takagi

This is an introduction to the history and experience of Asians in America. This class will explore the factors for immigration, working and living conditions of Asian laborers in this country, and the social relations between the minority and majority, as well as those between the various Asian ethnic groups. Reading Requirements: Erika Lee, The Making of Asian America, A History, 2015. Articles on Canvas Written Requirements: 10 (annotated bibliographic sets). These bibliographies are worth 33.3% of the total grade. (Total 100 points) 1 paper (10 pages) This is a joint project. This paper is worth 33.3% of the total grade. (Total 100 points) Take home exam. This exam is worth 33.3% of the total grade. (Total 100 points) For Fairhaven students, all bibliographic entries, papers, and exams will be evaluated.

FAIR 221J Interdisciplinary Writing

Credits: 5

Instructor: Simon

In the 21st century, innovators must explain their ideas clearly and compellingly, and in various forms, to suit our message-dense media environment. This course is a craft / writing workshop in which students incorporate the art of storytelling to write well-researched creative personal essays (or other forms or hybrids - magazine features, memoirs, thought experiments, or interdisciplinary works, for example) based on their own interests, or on their work in their individualized majors or courses of study. Here, you can sharpen your chops for explaining, illustrating, and illuminating your ideas in writing, and use the crucial tools of elemental analysis and the creative writing workshop to hone your skills for persuasion through storytelling. You will learn to report your findings in creative and compelling new ways that could work as pieces of long-form journalism, as blog posts, as nonfiction book chapters, radio programs, podcasts, or some other new or not yet imagined form. We will work in a few modes - which may include short story, personal essay, reportage, and basic argument. Credit/evaluation: written assignments and revisions, written and oral critique of classmates' work, and regular attendance. Texts: Readings will be provided. Students will provide hard copies of their work for classmates.

FAIR 223G Elements of Style

Instructor: Tag

What is a comma but a claw rending the sheet, the asthmatic's grasp? What is a question mark but what's needed to complete this thought? Punctuation: what is it, after all, but another way of cutting up time, creating or negating relationships, telling words when to take a rest, when to get on with their relentless stories, when to catch their breath?--Karen Elizabeth Gordon If you care even the least whit about how you write, this is a class for you. We will certainly examine the rules and principles of English composition, including grammar, punctuation, word usage, sentence construction, and strategies for proofreading and revision. But such examinations are sometimes dull, stuffy, self-righteous, and boring. Ours will attempt a more stylish exploration of written style, like trying on hats in a haberdashery, or hounding the hobgoblins from our foolish consistencies, or swinging outward on a swaggering buccaneer's highest rope. Will it be dangerous? Of course! An education should be. So come all ye word-sick, word-loving, word-puzzled pilgrims. Bring your grammatical contusions and confusions. Your punctuated paralysis. Your fears of saying what you have to say, clearly and directly. Together we will try to unlock the mysteries of writing with style (or at least help decide when to use a dash--when parentheses). We will un-dangle our participles, un-awk our words. All are welcome to take this course. This will be a fun and challenging one-credit course, hopefully helping each of us get out of our one-horse towns, tilt at a few windmills, and learn what there is to learn in the wide, wide world of writing well. Text: Noah Lukeman, A Dash of Style. Credit/Evaluation: Faithful attendance. Active participation in all in-class writing exercises. Quality and completion of weekly writing exercises. Presentation of a special project.

FAIR 246 Mariachi Music/Perform&Culture

Credits: 3

Instructor: Miyake

This course is repeatable for up to a total of twelve (12) credits. Ever since its establishment as a centerpiece of Mexican popular culture in the first half of the 20th century, Mariachi music has acted both as a central expression of Mexican identity and also as one of the most widely recognized representations of Mexican people and culture for those outside of this community. Students in this class will explore this cultural and artistic movement through both academic engagement and hands-on experience in creating this music themselves. Class meetings will include sessions in which we will discuss academic and popular texts on Mariachi music and culture as well as participating in discussions with guest speakers and performers, and sessions in which class members will learn to perform Mariachi music in both individual and ensemble formats. No experience in performing Mariachi music is required for this class- all instruction and expected musical collaborations will be designed to fit the experience level of each individual student. Required Texts: Wade, Bonnie C. Thinking Musically: Experiencing Music, Expressing Culture. 3rd ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 2013. Sheehy, Daniel Edward. Mariachi Music in America: Experiencing Music, Expressing Culture. New York: Oxford University Press, 2006. Texts for this course will also include other articles, book chapters, and music as assigned by the instructor. NB: Alternate readings will be provided for students who have already received credit for this course in an earlier quarter Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will take account of regular attendance, evidence of critical reading, engagement in class discussion and completion of assignments.

FAIR 255Y Folk Music Experience

Credits: 2

Instructor: Bower

This course combines playing and singing folk music with the study of the contexts in which folk music has evolved. For this quarter, the course will focus on music surrounding the 1969 Woodstock Music and Art Fair. We will look at the story of Woodstock and make connections between Woodstock and the 1960's folk revival as well as 60's rock and roll music. Students will be expected to participate in discussions on the book Woodstock: The Oral History during the first five weeks of the course. Each student will also be asked to introduce one song to the class that enriches our knowledge of folk music or the context within which folk music has been written and performed. These songs should come from the Woodstock and the 1960's music scene. Students will write a short research paper that forms the basis for their presentations on the song and its context. Students will also be responsible for learning and practicing the songs that are presented to the class, including practice in small groups. Students are encouraged to gain practice at playing one or more folk music instruments during the course and are invited to join the course even if they are beginners at playing an instrument or if they prefer to just sing.

Texts: Texts will change from quarter to quarter. For the spring we will read Joel Makower: WOODSTOCK: THE ORAL HISTORY. Requirements for credits and criteria for evaluation: Regular attendance and participation in our weekly sing, informed participation in class discussions, one short research paper and song presentation, and practicing music in a small group.

FAIR 270B Intro to Digital Video Prod

Credits: 2

Instructor: Miller

This class will introduce basic camera use and video editing in the digital medium. Students will script, shoot, and edit 5 assignments using Final Cut Pro. Projects range from a 30-second commercial to a 3-5 minute final video on the student's choice of topic. S/U grading.

FAIR 270H Intro to Audio Recording

Credits: 4

Instructor: Wallace

Introduction to Audio explores the techniques, tools, and technology used in multi-track recording. From a beginner's perspective, this course works to develop the fundamental skills of critical listening, analog signal flow, and basic analog/digital hybrid recording. By examining the various steps in the recording process students will learn the concepts and skills necessary to use studio equipment such as microphones (their characteristics and placement), mixing consoles (explained in detail), hard disk recording, patch bays, signal and effect processors, and headphone systems. Each student is also expected to attend a weekly two-hour small group lab, held in the studio, giving the student a chance to experience multi-track recording in a hands-on manner. Texts: Modern Recording Techniques (9th edition) by David Miles Huber and selected readings from The Audio Expert by Ethan Winer. Excerpts from the Audio Expert text will be available online. Credit/Evaluation: Students will be evaluated through a combination of participation, attendance (lab and lecture), reading assignments, and understanding gained from the material evaluated from a hands-on assessment. Additionally, students will be required to complete a basic tracking session with their lab assistant in the studio as a final project.

FAIR 303A Core:Intrdisc Cncntrtn Sem Required Core

Credits: 5

Instructor: Friedland

Prerequisites: FAIR 101A, FAIR 201A, FAIR 203A, FAIR 305A What questions do you want to explore in your Interdisciplinary Concentration? (Are you asking questions, for example, about inequalities, ecology, musical cultures, or performance?) Why are these questions important enough intellectually, politically, socially or professionally to form the basis for your Interdisciplinary Concentration? Your challenge in the Concentration Seminar is a two- or three-fold one. First, you must answer the question of why your concentration matters to your own satisfaction. Second, you want to communicate the reasons why your concentration's questions matter to the mythical "average reader" in your rationale. Third, you must identify the set of courses, independent study projects, internships, or other forms of experiential learning that allow you to explore your underlying questions about your subject in the rest of your time at Fairhaven College. In practical terms, the seminar is designed to assist you with your development and writing of an interdisciplinary concentration. It will serve as a forum for discussion, guidance, and support during the proposal writing process. You will work collaboratively with your seminar, your instructor, and your concentration committee, to write your learning proposal and identify relevant courses and experiences to help you achieve your educational goals. Here are some of the practical questions this seminar will help to address: - What are the appropriate guidelines and requirements involved? - What exactly is it you want to achieve in your degree? - How can your intentions be given effective shape and form? - Who should be on your committee? - How do the parts of your concentration work together conceptually? - What are the best vehicles for your learning? - What should you put in and what should you leave out of your concentration? Text: Handbook on Canvas + Occasional Readings distributed in class Credit/Evaluation: Faithful preparation for and attendance at seminar; Steady work on your proposal; Contributions to the development of your group members' proposals. Credit for the course is granted when your completed committee-approved proposal has been filed with the Fairhaven Records Office and a regular self-evaluation form is submitted to the instructor.

FAIR 305A Writing & Transition Conferenc Required Core

Credits: 3

Instructor: Schwandt

The Writing Portfolio and Transition Conference are Core graduation requirements for all Fairhaven College students. Your Writing Portfolio will be a selective collection of your academic writing and an introductory statement of self-assessment about your writing at this point in your education. It will be reviewed and assessed by your Fairhaven faculty advisor. Your Transition Conference is a constructive mid-point conversation with advising resource people you invite to share your educational plans and collect advice officially moving you from the "Exploratory" stage of Fairhaven's program into the "Concentrated" stage of your educational plans, regardless of your choice of major. You should embark on these requirements when you and your faculty advisor agree you're ready for them. This is not a class, however you must attend one orientation meeting early in the quarter. Details about the orientation meeting schedule will be sent to all enrolled students via email and posted on the FAIR 305A class CANVAS site. In order to receive credit for FAIR 305A you must: 1) Submit your Writing Portfolio prepared according to specifications to be provided at our orientation and on our class Canvas site. 2) Schedule and conduct a Transition Conference which includes writing and circulating a Transition Conference Statement to your invited participants prior to the conference. Additional details and instructions will be provided at our orientation and on our class Canvas site.

FAIR 314E Critical Pedagogy Society and Individual 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Calderon

In this course we will draw from empirical research to examine the social, political, economic, and historical context of schooling for students of color in U.S. K-12 and higher educational systems. Students will be introduced to a set of ethnic studies concepts and theories from which to better understand the educational experiences and realities of historically underrepresented students. The course will also challenge students to reflect on their educational experiences and the schooling conditions of students of color in general, and to apply the concepts introduced in class to their own educational experiences. More specifically, the course is intended to enable students to: 1)Develop an understanding of the histories, concepts, perspectives, and theories used to examine the complex realities of historically underrepresented students; 2)Articulate their understanding of concepts such as privilege, microagressions, institutional racism, whiteness, resistance, decolonization, and activism, and apply these concepts to their personal educational experiences and to the debate over educational (under)achievement, (in)equity, and the politics of education; 3)Engage in inter-ethnic/racial dialogues about race and racism, the use of power and privilege to institutionalize inequity, methods for achieving social and educational change. Texts: Pedagogy of the Oppressed, Teaching to Transgress, Juarez Girls Rising, and various research articles. Credit/Evaluation (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory): Evaluation will take account of regular attendance, evidence of critical reading, engagement in class discussion, and completion of assignments.

FAIR 334J Genocide Society and Individual 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Akinrinade

Course Description: This course explores the meaning, origins, forms and causes of genocide. It will examine major cases of genocide up to the present century as a basis for understanding the phenomenon. Case studies will include the experience of Native Americans, the Armenians in the Ottoman Empire, the Nazi Holocaust, the Khmer Rouge period in Cambodia, and the cases of Rwanda and the Darfur region of The Sudan. To better understand the subject, the course will compare genocide, considered by many as the "ultimate crime" with other cases of mass murders, including war crimes and crimes against humanity - a recurring part of armed conflict in more recent times. The course will also explore ways in which this crime can be confronted and the role of international law in dealing with genocide. Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will take account of regular attendance, evidence of critical reading, engagement in class discussion, the quality of short reactions, and two assignments. There will be no course credit for anyone who misses three (3) classes in the quarter. Text: THE ROOTS OF EVIL: THE ORIGINS OF GENOCIDE AND OTHER GROUP VIOLENCE, by Staub, Ervin; Others TBA.

FAIR 334K Human Trafficking & Smuggling Society and Individual 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Akinrinade

Course Description: This course is an interdisciplinary examination of the various manifestations of human trafficking and human smuggling: human trafficking, bonded labor, forced labor, worst forms of child labor, organ trafficking, prostitution and sexual slavery. It examines the rise and growth of these issues, as well as the social, political, economic, and legal consequences for peoples around the world. The course also examines the challenges of addressing human trafficking and human smuggling, and the appropriate policy responses to the problem by governments, civil society, businesses, the international community, and individual actors. Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will take account of regular attendance, evidence of critical reading, engagement in class discussion, the quality of short reactions, and two assignments. No course credit for anyone missing three classes. TEXT: Louis Shelley, Human Trafficking: A Global Perspective (2010)

FAIR 334P Salish Sea Marine Biology Science and Our Place on the Planet 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Bower

Pre-Reqs: Fairhaven 206 The Salish Sea is an international inland sea that includes the Strait of Juan De Fuca, Strait of Georgia, Puget Sound, and many smaller bays and inlets (such as Bellingham Bay). These waters are fascinating and important biologically. Eroding mountains provide and rivers deliver nutrients to the marine ecosystem, while complex currents, tides, and high winds mix nutrients throughout the water column, providing the life source for a highly productive and diverse food web featuring plankton, seaweeds, invertebrates, fish, birds, and marine mammals, and more. These waters have and continue to support many human communities, from Coast Salish and other tribes, to today's ever-increasing human population. Past and present resource use and pollution threatens the biological integrity of this marine system. In this field course we will examine all of these things. We will learn to identify common marine species, and will seek to understand how Salish Sea ecosystems function- from estuaries, to intertidal zones, to the deeper pelagic waters. We will also consider the threats to the marine environment and evaluate what is being done to preserve and restore its biological integrity. Texts: To Be Determined - I will email students in December to let them know what texts I have chosen.

Credit/Evaluation: Regular attendance and informed participation in classes and field trips, ability to learn to identify species of marine algae, invertebrates, birds, fish, and marine mammals. Two drafts of a group scientific field research project based in the marine environment, and a presentation on marine environmental issues. Note this class will meet for four hour field trips on five Thursdays during the quarter, and will also do three nighttime visits to tidepools (to be arranged). We will not meet on some Thursdays in the quarter.

 

FAIR 335H HIV & AIDS in a Global Context Science and Our Place on the Planet 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Schwandt

Course Description: Students in this course will learn the biology of HIV and AIDs as well as the social and political factors that affected the spread, positively or negatively, of HIV in a global context. Topics will include the typology of the HIV virus, how the virus interacts with the human host, the spread of HIV, the process of moving from HIV infection to an AIDs diagnoses, the history of HIV from an American perspective, the history of HIV from a non-Western perspective, the current approach to HIV treatment, and the future direction of HIV prevention and treatment programs. Links between the biology, social, political, and historical aspects of HIV in a global context will be emphasized throughout the course - as well as with other infectious diseases.

Text: AIDS in the 21st Century; by Tony Barnett and Alan Whiteside Credit/Evaluation: Students will respond to required readings with written and creative reflective assignments and by participating in class discussions. Students will also do a critical movie review of one film on the course topic - sharing clips from the movie and the critique with the course. Finally, students will also be responsible for completing two drafts of a formal research paper related to the course topic of HIV/AIDs. Regular, prompt attendance is essential to your learning and to the nurturing of our class learning community. Informed participation in class discussions and timely completion of all reading, creative, and writing assignments is required. Evaluation will be based on demonstrated understanding and engagement with the course content.

FAIR 335P Global Biodiversity Conservation Science and Our Place on the Planet 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Tuxill

This course studies "biodiversity"--the diversity and richness of life on earth. Do you enjoy different kinds of fruits, vegetables, and spices in your daily diet? Thankful for fast-acting medicine--or maybe a soothing herbal tea--when you're sick? Appreciate clean water, fertile soil in your garden, and clothes made from natural fibers and dyes? Thank biodiversity for all of that. Over the past two decades, biological diversity--including the variety of living organisms and ecological patterns in nature--has emerged as a key concept for how scientists, philosophers, and many others think about the environment and our place in it. The future that people determine for biodiversity will play a crucial role in the health of the planet and the sustainability of human societies. This course has three primary goals. The first is to learn how biological diversity is defined, measured, mapped, and understood through ecological science. The second is to understand the benefits biodiversity provides for humankind and the ways that those benefits are increasingly placed at risk. The third goal is to explore strategies and policies for conserving and sustaining biological diversity worldwide. In exploring threats to biodiversity and the policies and institutions designed to conserve it, we will examine underlying assumptions about globalization, sustainability, and environmental preservation.

Texts: BIOPHILIA by E.O. Wilson. Additional readings and references will be available on line at the course Canvas site. Credit/Evaluation: Regular attendance and informed contribution to discussions and field labs (including two Saturday field trips). Students also will complete: (1) online research assignments and field labs; (2) a mid-term essay exam (take home, open book); and (3) a class presentation and final paper on a case study of biodiversity conservation.

FAIR 336B Psych of Race & Racism Society and Individual 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Haizlip

Psychology is the study of human motivation, how human beings perceive themselves and others, how human beings behave, and how human beings change. This class will focus on psychological issues in the context of the African American community and Black experience. We begin the course with an overview of Black/African American psychology as an evolving field of study and consider the Black/African American Psychology paradigm as one of the key conceptual frameworks for understanding the psychological experiences of African Americans. In the second part of the course, we explore a range of topics that pertain to the psychological experiences of African Americans such as racism and discrimination, achievement and schooling, kinship and family, racial identity, religion and spirituality, and African American mental health. A focus of the course is the range of theoretical and methodological approaches that scholars have developed to conceptualize the thoughts, styles, and behaviors of African Americans. Finally, we conclude the course with discussions of current topics, controversies, and recent advances in African American psychology. Throughout the course, a primary objective will be to consider how our knowledge of African American psychological experiences can be used to promote African American psychological health and wellness. In order to fully reflect upon privileges that are afforded as a result of social and cultural positionality, we must also deepen our empathy towards individuals and communities that experience various forms of disadvantage as a result of being the "other". Otherism is the overarching term that describes various prejudices (i.e., racism, classism, sexism, ageism, etc.) and the experience of being different, odd, weird, and an outsider in various social contexts and settings. Upon completion of this course students will: --Demonstrate knowledge of the historical roots of psychology from an African centered perspective and be able to identify the development of Black Psychology as a distinct system of psychological thought and research. --Display knowledge of the African centered world views and its role in the psychological study of people of African descent. --Demonstrate an understanding of how the "Lived Black Experience" can aid in the overall understanding of the Black experience and provide a frame of reference for which to study the psychological experience of other people throughout the world. --Explore his or her world views as it relates to their personal psychological and social experiences. EVALUATION/ASSESSMENT: This course will use a combination of didactic discourse, consciousness raising seminars, audiovisual literature, and extensive discussion focusing on the historical and cultural representation of psychology from an "othering" centered perspective. Recommended Readings: Parham, Thomas A., Ajamu, Adisa and White, Joseph, L,. (2011).The Psychology of Blacks: Centering Our Perspective In African Consciousness. Forth Edition, Prentice Hall Wright, Bobby, E. (1984). The Psychopathic Racial Personality and Other Essays: Third World Press, Chicago (Book Provided by Instructor). Optional Readings: Russell, Kathy, Wilson, Midge, and Hall, Ronald, (1993). The Color Complex: The Politics of Skin Color Among African- Americans. Anchor Books Division of Random House, Inc. New York

FAIR 336B Neoliberalism & Public School Society and Individual 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Pierce

Neoliberalism and the Public School

Neoliberalism is an economic and social model of governance rooted in the idea that society is best organized under the rule of radical free markets. This course examines and charts the rise of neoliberal driven school reform in the U.S. Special focus will be given to how free market school reform models treat ongoing racial and economic injustice in the U.S. Case study examples of New Orleans, Chicago, and Washington DC will be used to analyze the results of corporate education governance. Both a theoretical and historical approach will be taken to evaluate the claims made by neoliberal education reform proponents for achieving racial and economic equity through public education. Students will also be asked to analyze and present reflection projects on the recent Washington State Charter School Initiative (Proposition 1240) as well as community responses such as the "opt out" movement. Learning Outcomes: Define and understand the principal assumptions of neoliberal economic and social policy; Identify consequences of neoliberal education reform policies in major U.S. cities; Evaluate the claims of equity and justice made by proponents of neoliberal education reformers; Apply course knowledge to construct arguments for what a racially and economic just public education system should include Credit and Evaluation: Participation in class discussion and regular attendance; Timely and thoughtful completion of course readings and writing assignments; quality of writing assignments that use evidence from course readings; quality of reflection projects; critical and respectful engagement in class Required Texts: 1.) Naomi Kline, The Shock Doctrine. 2.) Kenneth Saltman, The Failure of Corporate School Reform. 3.) Pauline Lipman, The New Political Economy of Urban Education: Neoliberalism, Race, and the Right of the City

FAIR 336B Dysfunctional Family Society and Individual 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Haizlip

The nuances of our family dynamics play an important role in understanding how we behave in other relationships and in our community. While we may not give it much attention, our concept of family has a great impact on individual and social psychology. As societies perception of family continues to grow and evolve, this course aims to normalize dysfunctional dynamics in all families, as well as differentiate between "Dysfunction and Abuse". Abuse is characterized by a person subjecting, or exposing, another person to behavior that may result in psychological trauma, including anxiety, chronic depression, or post-traumatic stress disorder. This course focuses on problems which emerge as a result of varying parenting practices and family constellation dynamics specifically. The course addresses a broad spectrum of issues including the definition of dysfunctional families, the factors which cause child maltreatment, families with substance abusing parent (alcohol, drugs, etc.), emotional abuse, physical abuse, financial abuse, sexual abuse, and treatment and prevention. We will also expand the topic into the investigation of abuse towards animals, looking at theoretical perspectives of the abused, as well as the abuser. As a result of the psychological trauma caused by abuse, the course will further investigate how victims of abuse cope, heal, and survive after experiencing abuse. Evaluation/Assessment: Students will participate in deeply personal reflective activities, growth groups, and academic debates. Evaluation and assessment will rely heavily on class participation, reflective journaling, and social learning projects. Essential Readings: Brown, L. (2008). Cultural Competence in Trauma Therapy: Beyond the Flashback. American Psychological Association. Drozdek, B & Wilson, J. (Eds) (2007). Voices of Trauma: Treating Survivors Across Cultures. Springer. Van der Kolk, B.A., McFarlane, A.C., and Weisaeth, L., (Eds.) (2007). Traumatic Stress: The Effect of Overwhelming Experience on Mind, Body, and Society. Guilford Press: New York.

FAIR 336B Psychosocial Apprchs to Gender Society and Individual 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Delucio

Description: This course provides an overview of the various theoretical perspectives and empirical research in the social sciences concerning gender. Initially, we will consider some of the general perspectives of how gender has historically been studied. Then, we will turn to selected specific topics, such as gender identity development, stereotyping, and work/career experiences, for which gender similarities and differences have been examined. Considerable attention will be directed toward understanding the complex social category of "gender," given that gender can be constructed differently depending on the cultural context, the perceiver's goals, and even the life stage of the experiencer. We will spend time discussing how gender intersects with other identities (like race, sexual orientation, and disability) to influence our understanding of gender and how these intersections influence different outcomes related to behavior, as well as physical and mental health. Course Texts: There will be no required textbook for this course. Course readings will be provided on Canvas.

Criteria for Credit/Evaluation: Regular attendance (i.e., no more than 3 absences); active and engaged participation in class discussions; a reflective paper outlining personal gender identity development and understanding; a critical analysis paper analyzing gender representations in media; and a final presentation

FAIR 336N Global Food Sovereignty Science and Our Place on the Planet 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Jessica Gigot

Food sovereignty is the right of people to define their own food systems. We will examine and define the concept of food sovereignty within a regional and global context, emphasizing food access, food security, agroecology, and social justice issues. The class will also dissect the US Farm Bill as well as international food policies and organizations that influence food system organization and operations. Students will discuss and reflect on texts and related articles from several contemporary food sovereignty thinkers and activists and guest speakers/field trips will be engaged in local food issues. We will also focus specifically on soil health, Pacific Northwest food traditions, and the role of cultural identity and health in current food sovereignty efforts. In the third section of this course, students will be asked to investigate food sovereignty in their own lives and present this experiential learning and reflection to the class. REQUIRED TEXTS (will be available at library): -Food and Society by Amy Guptill, Denise Copelton, Betsy Lucal -One Size Fits None by Stephanie Anderson -The Third Plate by Dan Barber Additional Readings will be provided on CANVAS. CANVAS LEARNING OUTCOMES: -Define food sovereignty -Apply ecological and social concepts to global food systems -Identify food access, security and justice issues on regional and global levels -Evaluate the impact of farm policy on food availability and production -Determine and recognize Pacific Northwest traditional foods and their social and economic relevance EVALUATION: Participation in class discussions and field trips, timely completion of readings, completion of i) weekly response papers and a ii) final independent project.

FAIR 336V Art & Memory Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Feodorov

Prereq: Previous studio art classes or permission of instructor. This combination Studio Art/Seminar course focuses on utilizing memories and dreams as the basis for the creation of visual art. Students can draw upon their experiences and dreams using a variety of techniques such as drawing, painting, installation, photography, and mixed media. Students are encouraged to mine their personal memories to imbue their art with a deeper sense of meaning. A large part of this course focuses on continuing to develop existing art-making skills and the honing of conceptual themes. Students are required to keep a sketchbook (no less than 40 pages) to be turned in at the end of the quarter. My goal is to encourage and challenge you to explore new territories beyond your comfort zones. This course is about serious yet playful exploration. If you are looking for an "easy art class", this course is not for you. Students will also explore various theories about art and the subconscious, as well as artist movements such as Symbolism, Surrealism and German Expressionism. Students are expected to think critically about these theories and their relationship to ongoing issues of privilege, colonization and cultural appropriation. So, No Dream Catchers please! Students will be responsible for four art projects outside of class, as well as four in-class art projects, and write artist statements to accompany them. Students will present their projects to the class for discussion. Students will also give a class presentation in PowerPoint on an artist of their choosing whose work fits within the themes of memory and dream. Credit/Evaluation: Credit is based upon regular attendance, timely completion of all art projects, readings and writing assignments, regular informed participation in class discussions, engagement with the sketchbook and willingness to take creative and conceptual risks.

FAIR 336V Resistance Art of Indigena Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: S'eiltin

The contemporary visual and literary arts of Native peoples address historical injustice with passion and clarity, while offering hope for the future, and thus provides examples for investigation of related issues such as personal and cultural histories, government and state relations and the critique of Euro-American institutional practices. We will view and read the contributions of Native/Indigena artists whose work challenges the sociopolitical codes used to define Native Identity, sovereignty and cultural representation and renewal. We will experience the work and philosophy of various artists through the presentation of slides, literature, discussions and collaborative art workshops. Credit/Evaluation: The goal of the course is to gain an awareness of contemporary Native American art and its ability to reflect social, political and cultural issues.?Students will be required to create works of art, write three response essays, and a final research paper, 5 to 7 pages in length, which demonstrates an understanding of key concepts covered in the course.?Regular class attendance and full participation, and completion of all assignments are required. Students must be thoroughly prepared to share their understanding and observations of assigned readings. Absences exceeding more than three classes will result in no credit.

FAIR 343U Survey of Somatic Psychology

Credits: 4

Instructor: Nichols

Students interested in the emerging field of mind-body topics will benefit from this in-depth survey of Somatic Psychology. Through the assigned text and other interdisciplinary literature, lectures, discussion, and experiential inquiry, we will examine the emergence of a transdisciplinary inquiry into the nature and debatable unity of the body, the mind, the environment, and the resulting self-organizing felt sense experience. Over the past two decades this inquiry has matured into the field of Somatic Psychology, which seeks to advance philosophical arguments and empirical evidence to support, refine, and clarify the basic assumptions of a somatic life. Parallel to this intellectual mission is developing practical applications in the clinical psychotherapeutic domain. This course will map the historical emergence of Somatic Psychology and track the core questions and assumptions that define the field. We will examine a variety of body-centered psychotherapies and movement practices, and critically assess current and future challenges of the field, centering on some of the deepest and most passionate questions of academic inquiry. Are the mind and body separate? How do the mind and body relate? What is healing? What is energy? What is the placebo effect, and what does it say about the mind and body relationship? How does the gut participate in reason? How is our experience as embodied beings sculpted by culture? This course will embrace thinking through multiple lines of reasoning and the experiential exploration of Somatic Psychology. Text: THE EMERGENCE OF SOMATIC PSYCHOLOGY AND BODYMIND THERAPY, Barnaby B. Barratt (2010, Palgrave Macmillan). Credit/Evaluation: (1) Regular and timely attendance; (2) consistent participation; (3) one midterm visual map showing comprehension of the development of the field; (4) one 6-8 page integration paper, and (5) one final group project/ presentation on a specific branch of Somatic Psychology.

FAIR 343U Adv Topics in Mind and Body

Credits: 4

Instructor: Nichols

This course will be an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the emerging field of psychedelic science. It will begin with a cross-cultural look at the anthropology of psychedelics and entheobotany--the study of god- or divine-inducing plants. This course will review the data on the use and applications of entheogenic plants (and fungi as well), and differentiate the counter-cultural 1960's perspective from current research. We will examine and critically evaluate current research on the capacity of entheogenic plants to help issues ranging from terminal illness, PTSD, a range of addictions, and more. Along with this we will critically look at the use of psychedelics among people of marginalized experience and women. Through a variety of authors and educators we will look at alternative perspectives from marginalized voices. Some of these are; Dr. Monnica T. Williams, Ifetayo Harvey, and Nese Devenot. Learning Outcomes: -Understanding of the anthropological and cross-cultural context of psychedelic research. -Understanding of entheobotany. Identification and assessment of current science on the therapeutic potential and applications of entheogenic plants. Understand the complexity of critical issues around Psychedellic use among diverse populations. Credit/Evaluation: Informed and regular discussion. Participation in movement, breathing, and dance activities. Biweekly reading questions. Two synopsis papers. One 6-8 page research paper on a topic of your choice relating to our inquiry. Required Text: Plants of the Gods (2nd Edition) by Richard Evans Schultes. How to change your mind by Micheal Pollan. Also journal articles (TBA) posted on Canvas.

FAIR 364 World Music and Culture

Credits: 4

Instructor: Sehman

This course examines select music traditions of the world, along with their many surrounding cultural contexts. The study of specific musical styles and traits will be accompanied by an examination of how individuals and cultures make that music meaningful in their lives, including: culturally relative conceptions, aesthetics, and definitions of music; specific functions of music in culture; music as a tool for individual and cultural identity; the process of musical composition and transmission; methods of teaching and learning; social status and roles of music makers; globalization, diaspora and their effect on music traditions. Specific music cultures studied will include? *South Indian Carnatic classical music *Indian Bollywood film music? *Javanese and Balinese gamelan? *Indonesian puppet theatre (Wayang kulit) *West African Mande storytelling music *Shona mbira music of Zimbabwe This course will also provide an overview of ethnomusicology, the academic field involving the study of music in culture. Topics will include: Standard research methods and goals; the ethics and power structures of fieldwork; objectivity and subjectivity in the field; methods of documenting music. *All students are welcome to participate in this course; No experience with technical music making is required.

Texts Titon, Jeff Todd, editor. Worlds of Music. 5th ed., Schirmer Cengage, 2009. Wade, Bonnie C. Thinking Musically. 3rd ed., Oxford University Press, 2013. Requirements/Evaluation Students will be expected to complete all reading and listening assignments, and actively participate in class discussions. Each student will present a reading/listening and lead class discussion at least once during the quarter. There will be short written reflections based on reading and listening assignments. Students will complete a research project on a topic of their choosing.

FAIR 370I Introduction to Pro Tools

Credits: 4

Instructor: Wallace

Prerequisites: 270H (before or during) or permission of instructor

Intro to Pro Tools builds off of knowledge gained in the Intro to Audio course regarding the use of basic audio recording equipment, such as mixing consoles, compressors, equalizers, and other outboard processors. Students will take this knowledge and apply it to the digital realm while learning the specifics of recording audio and MIDI, editing, and mixing using Avid's Pro Tools software. Covered topics will include: importing and recording audio into Pro Tools, editing and manipulating performances, MIDI, the use of plug-ins, and an overview of mixing processes such as compression/limiting and equalization. Students will be expected to attend class regularly and demonstrate critical listening skills through critique of their classmates' work. Additionally, the Fairhaven Mixing Suite and Fairhaven Recording Studio, as well as the Miller Hall computer lab will be available for use all quarter and required for certain projects. Texts: Reprinted materials. Credit/Evaluation: Projects will be evaluated throughout the quarter by the instructor.

FAIR 370J Studio Recording

Credits: 4

Instructor: Fish

Prerequisites: 370I or 370P Studio Recording takes the concepts introduced in Intro to Audio and Intro to Pro Tools and allows the student to apply and practice them in a hands-on manner, with the goal of becoming familiar with and competent in the use of the equipment in the Champion St Studio. Students will complete at least three multi-track recording projects and will have the opportunity to work on other recording sessions as well. Through the students' work on these projects they will learn efficiency and speed in the techniques of tracking, overdubbing, and mixdown sessions. The recording projects will be evaluated by the instructor as well as the other students in the class. This course will also involve development of critical listening skills as well as the creative and imaginative expression possible in audio recording. Students will keep a detailed journal of their session work. This is a Pro Tools based course and enrolled students will gain access to the Fairhaven Studio, Mixing Suite, and Champion St Studios.

Texts: The Recording Engineer's handbook (3rd edition) by Owsinski

Credit/Evaluation: Each student must finish the assigned projects which will be critiqued by the instructor and peers based on sound quality, balance, clarity and realization. Overall evaluation will be made based on effort, participation and growth as an engineer.

FAIR 370K Advanced Studio Recording

Credits: 4

Instructor: Fish

Prereq: FAIR 370J or 370H

This class will give students with advanced recording experience the opportunity to record and mix on an industry standard Pro Tools 12 HD system. Students will enhance their knowledge of Pro Tools and learn how to use this software in conjunction with a large-format analog mixing console. Topics such as drum sample replacement, audio quantization, convolution impulse responses, spectrum analysis, DSP processing and other advanced topics will be covered. Students will be expected to conduct at least three recording/mixing sessions throughout the quarter and prepare a final portfolio for in-class critique. Students will also learn how to properly configure Pro Tools HD hardware and software components, how to setup session templates and how to utilize each component of an HD/analog system. This is a Pro Tools based course and enrolled students will gain access to the Fairhaven Studio, Mixing Suite, and Champion St Studios. Repeatable for up to 12 credits, but with instructor approval and only if open spaces are available after students who are not repeating the course have had a chance to register. S/U grading Texts: Reprinted materials.

FAIR 381G Topics: Reimagining Borders Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Friedland

Borders, Diaspora, Belonging A literature in practice situates students at the crossroads of lived experiences and social realities in which narratives are created. The goal is to make pertinent connections between literary production and its context beyond the page to which a deep reading of any world compels us towards. In this course, we will study borders, both a political reality and an imaginative construct - an organizing principle that allows for a holistic approach to the course's guiding question: what does it mean to be a crosser of borders? In order to answer this question in its widest sense, we will operate in an intermediate space between academic discipline and community engagement, research and creative practice. The course readings reflect literature produced at local, national and international borders, translation practices, documentary poetics, diaspora narratives and aesthetics, as well as ethical considerations when working with or writing about migrant and refugee communities. During our in-class sessions we will integrate the study of border and diaspora literature with visits from writers, activists and community organizers.

-Evaluation: active participation during our in-class discussions and peer review sessions; timely submission of drafts, keeping a journal and make pertinent links between texts and practical experiences in the field, submit a final portfolio of writings. Course Objectives: -Hone writing skills in multiple genre forms: essays, interviews, poetry, reportage -Foster collaborative learning spaces across campuses and disciplines. -Engage in critical discussions comparative understandings, and interdisciplinary methods for addressing border issues. -Develop new critical as well as creative interventions that add to the dynamic archive of border processes, which continue to shape its meaning. Read major and minor works of contemporary border literature.

 

FAIR 381G Topics in Lit: Journaling Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Credits: 5

Instructor: Tag

This class will be co-taught by Stan Tag and Ruby Ted Seago, a Fairhaven senior.

What sort of diary should I like mine to be? Something loose-knit and yet not slovenly, so elastic that it will embrace anything, solemn, slight or beautiful that comes into my mind. I should like it to resemble some deep old desk, or capacious hold-all, in which one flings a mass of odds and ends without looking them through. I should like to come back, after a year or two, and find that the collection had sorted itself and refined itself and coalesced, as such deposits so mysteriously do, into a mould, transparent enough to reflect the light of our life, and yet steady, tranquil compounds with the aloofness of a work of art.--Virginia Woolf

What sort of diary or journal would you like yours to be? Journals can be reflective, cathartic, transformational, private, performative, visual, auditory--a container of time, experience, and identity. Journals take many forms. The word "journal" itself means "a place to shine the light." What is it you want to illuminate in your own life? In the life of the world inside you? Around you? Emily Dickinson said, "I dwell in Possibility." How might you create your journal to not only reflect honestly on your experiences, but to reimagine them and to dwell in the possibilities such reimagining offers you and others? In this class we will explore the intersections between the personal and the private and the performance of self; we will write together and on our own, sharing some readings and keeping others to ourselves. We will go on field trips, taking notes in real time, observing the world around us. We will read widely and deeply from a diverse range of journals by writers, activists, artists, explorers, and others. We will experiment with forms of journaling, reframing, reimagining, and navigating our conceptualizations of what it means to keep a journal. At times we will work with prompts in and out of the classroom investigating different parts of our lives--memory, family, relationships, identity, emotions, obsessions, questions--and do freewriting exercises to loosen up our writing body. We hope our personal and collective journeys in this class will awaken each of us to live with more depth, curiosity, artfulness, and motivation as we continue journaling long after the class ends. 

Texts: To be announced. Many readings will be on Canvas. Credit/Evaluation: Faithful attendance, completion of all the readings, participation in class discussions, activities, and all individual and group work. Quality and completion of written and creative assignments, including reflection essays, artwork, presentations, journal exercises, and a quarter-long journal.

FAIR 403A Advanced Seminar Required Core

Credits: 4

Instructor: Helling

ANNE TREAT, Spring 2007 grad, said: "There is no possible way I can give justice to the complexity of experiences, triumphs, pitfalls and challenges of my academic career in the course of this paper. This artifact of self-reflection is simply a pause in the broader conversation of my academic journey, an invitation for me to mindfully articulate the ways those things I've studied, read, discussed and experienced over the past four years have informed and challenged my personal development, and how I've chosen to integrate and express that knowledge through the actions of my life" This seminar is a wonderful opportunity to reflect on what you have been up to all these years of being educated--through writing, conversation, presentations, and listening to each other. You will read and discuss a book and other readings, co-facilitating at least one discussion; write and share a variety of short writing assignments, designed to help you complete your Summary and Evaluation, and provide a supportive community in which to summarize and critically reflect upon your Fairhaven (or Life) education. Each student will also present or teach something to the class from the heart of his or her educational experience. This course is one of our favorites to teach at Fairhaven because we learn so much about our students, and the many intriguing, complex, deep, creative and quirky ways there are to be human and to become educated. The class also illustrates the value of writing as a process of discovery, synthesis and meaning. We will all do our best to help you express most clearly what your education has been about, and are honored to learn from your stories, your minds, your creativity, and your lives. The course will be as significant as you make it. Be honest. It is your life, your education, so let us understand what it has meant and what it really means to you now.

FAIR 412E Criminal Procedure Society and Individual 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Helling

Text: Joshua Dressler, Cases and Materials on Criminal Law (Sixth edition) (important to get the right edition) Prerequisites: Introductory course on the American legal or political system (or permission of the instructor). Description: This is a study of substantive American criminal law using a law school casebook. Topics include the theories of punishment and rehabilitation, intent, and defenses such as insanity and self-defense. We will compare the common law and Model Penal Code versions of criminal law by looking at case studies of specific crimes. Requirements: Rigorous reading load, averaging 30 dense pages per class. Regular and punctual attendance required and students will be expected to come to class having read and briefed the legal cases. Weekly response papers and three papers of 4-6 pages of case analysis required. No more than three absences allowed.

FAIR 414D Topic Social Justice Education Society and Individual 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Calderon

Topics in Social Justice Education This course explores key themes and ideas that have been developed within the area of study referenced as Critical Indigenous studies. Collectively, concepts of sovereignty, Indigenous self-determination, epistemology/ways of being, amongst others, are explored in relationship to the nation-state, citizenship, and empire. Some of the major contributions by Indigenous scholars we will cover include settler colonialism, Native feminisims, by scholars such as Jodi Byrd, Dolores Calderon, Glen Coulthard, Sarah Deer, David Gegeo, Daniel Justice, Audra Simpson, Leann Simpson, Linda Tuhiwai Smith, Kim TallBear, Margo Tamez, and Eve Tuck. Selected readings will be available on the course Canvas site. Credit/Evaluation: Regular attendance, engaged/active participation in all class exercises, engagement in class discussion, strong evidence of reading, quality performance on assignments throughout the quarter, quality of writing.

FAIR 422J Art of the Essay: Writing the Body Humanities and the Expressive Arts 2

Instructor: Tag

This is an advanced level course in the art of essay writing--what some call the "personal essay" and others call "creative nonfiction." The etymological roots of the word "essay" mean simply to try, to make an attempt. In our essays we will be making honest attempts to say clearly and creatively what it is swirling around inside us. Essayist Scott Russell Sanders says: "Unlike novelists and playwrights, who lurk behind the scenes while distracting our attention with the puppet show of imaginary characters, unlike scholars and journalists, who quote the opinions of others and shelter behind the hedges of neutrality, the essayist has nowhere to hide. While the poet can lean back on a several-thousand-year-old legacy of ecstatic speech, the essayist inherits a much briefer and skimpier tradition. The poet is allowed to quit after a few lines, but the essayist must hold our attention over pages and pages. It is a brash and foolhardy form, this one-man or one-woman circus, which relies on the tricks of anecdote, conjecture, memory, and wit to enthrall us." This course will challenge each of us to push the boundaries of the personal essay form, focusing particularly on "writing the body," surely a potentially brash and foolhardy topic if there ever was one. And perhaps something vital and necessary, close to the skin, something we rarely take the time to explore in words. What is the body? Our bodies? Mine? Yours? What are the connections between body and mind? Body and soul? Body and the food we eat, the liquids we drink, or the air we breathe? What is the history of our bodies? How do family and culture and gender shape the ways we see and feel about our bodies? What do scars, moles, creases, hair, bones, pain, diseases say about who we are? What can we mean by producing a "body" of writing? Each of us will explore these questions and more and write and share three fully-revised and finished personal essays, each of them illuminations on the rich and intriguing possibilities in writing the body. Texts: Lidia Yuknavitch, The Chronology of Water; Ta-Nehisi Coates, Between the World and Me; Elissa Washuta, My Body is a Book of Rules; Ruth Ozeki, The Face: A Time Code.  Credit / Evaluation: Faithful attendance and participation in the work, writing workshops, and discussions of the class. Completion and quality of weekly writing exercises, and four personal essays, three of them revised, finished, and shared.

FAIR 422K Advanced Legal Writing Society and Individual 2

Credits: 4

Instructor: Lopez

This course is the SENIOR year capstone for the Law, Diversity & Justice Curriculum and will require you to put in a substantial amount of work using the law school writing textbooks. Students develop two main projects. Students write an appellate brief based on a question in front of the U.S. Supreme Court for which there is no answer. For the second project, students present the oral arguments to their briefs to a panel of three judges (known as a Moot Court). Though these projects may seem daunting at first, steady work will make them possible. It is imperative that you create a schedule and follow it.

Required Texts: A Practical Guide to Legal Writing and Legal Method, Sixth Edition. Dernbach, et. al. ISBN: 978-1-4548-8081-3. Evaluation/Credit: No more than THREE absences. Informed participation in class discussion by keeping up with the reading, load and doing the assigned exercises. Successful completion of case briefs of relevant cases and the creation of a Cases Notebook. Successful completion of the appellate brief in proper citation format BY THE DEADLINE. Successful oral argument in the Moot Court. Learning Objectives: -Review of legal vocabulary, role and hierarchy of trial and appellate courts, and the importance of the judicial system in government -Review of the sources and hierarchy of law, including the role of precedent and statutory construction -Review of basic legal research techniques -Continued practice with writing case briefs -Emphasis on legal reasoning--the synthesis of case law -Strengthen argument writing skills through the creation of an appellate brief -Strengthen oral advocacy skills through argument in a Moot Court -Strengthen project and time management skills