Courses

Fairhaven College Course Descriptions

Below you will find our current course descriptions.  Previous quarter course descriptions are also available by selecting the quarter and year you are searching for.  Electronic course descriptions are available back to winter 2009.  For information on days and times as well as location please visit Classfinder.  To register for these classes log into Web4U. Important information about registration including deadlines and fees can be found on the Registrar's Office page.  For any questions about these course descriptions or for assistance with registration please call the Fairhaven College Office at 360-650-6680. For information on Fairhaven College Wait List Policies click here.

Fairhaven College Core Requirements:

Classes determined to satisfy a Fairhaven Core requirement will be identified using the following icons: 

Required Core  Humanities and the Expressive Arts II
Science and Our Place on the Planet II Society and Individual II

Non-Fairhaven Students

Most Fairhaven classes open to all WWU students who meet the prerequisites in Phase II of registration.

FAIR 101A Intro Interdisciplinary Study

Credits: 1

Instructor: McClure

Prerequisites: Admission to Fairhaven College This class aims to introduce students to Fairhaven College resources, practices, processes and possibilities in their first quarter of enrollment in our program. Our class activities will include small group workshops, introductions to Fairhaven resources and people, community-based activities and individual advising. We will introduce the educational practices used at Fairhaven (Writing Portfolio; Transition Conference; Independent Study, Interdisciplinary Concentration, Narrative Evaluations...) and share the essentials you need to proceed toward your chosen major and take charge of your education.

Texts: There are no textbooks. Course materials provided in class and on Canvas. Credit/Evaluation: This Fairhaven College Core Class is a graduation requirement. Award of credit will be based on documented attendance, participation and completion of assignments as indicated in the class syllabus. Bring your curiosity, your questions and your active engagement. The learning outcomes for FAIR 101a include understanding resources, degree pathways, requirements and pedagogy that are the mission and practice at Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies.

FAIR 201A Critical & Reflective Inquiry

Credits: 5

Instructor: Brown

Doing, Being, Becoming: Prerequisite: Admission to Fairhaven College What happens when we center the body as a site of knowledge production and meaning making? How can we use the senses, embodiment, movement, and more to better understand the embedded politics of space, identity, and everyday life? This course is an introduction to the field of Performance Studies. Performance Studies is an interdisciplinary field that draws on anthropology, cultural studies, gender studies, critical race theory, and more and uses performance to look beyond the stage to mine the historical, social, cultural, and political constructs of our day to day lives. We will look at storytelling, folklore, digital media, political speeches, rituals, celebrations, everyday behavior, objects, environments--all of which communicate and enact certain values, beliefs, and messages that shape what we see, what we think, and how we act. By learning to analyze these structures, students will be able to apprehend and intervene upon their own positionality. In addition, performance studies believes in embodied learning, so we will apply key theories to sites and events through hands-on assignments. Required Texts: Course Pack from Bookstore Credit: Students will receive credit for the course upon meeting all attendance and participation policies in the syllabus, submitting all assignments by the appropriate due date, and the satisfactory quality of in and out of class assignments including, but not limited to: active participation in discussion and embodied workshops, completing all readings and viewings outside of class, field trips, in-class exercises, and a final research paper.

FAIR 201A Critical & Reflective Inquiry

Credits: 5

Instructor: Helling

Civil Rights Prerequisite: Admission to Fairhaven College This class will take a good look at what "civil rights" are in a legal sense and whether relying on them can achieve equality in our country.

What is the reach and promise of the law in securing equality?

Are there inherent obstacles in pursuing a legal strategy? How might we best go about fashioning a society that includes everyone fully? Texts:

THE NEW JIM CROW by Michelle Alexander; BETWEEN THE WORLD AND ME by Ta-Nehisi Coates; MARCH (volumes 1-3) by John Lewis. Credit/Evaluation: This is a seminar class that relies heavily on increasingly sophisticated discussions of privilege and law; thus, attendance is extremely important as concepts build on one another and class discussions cannot be replicated. Active participation in discussions informed by thoughtful reflection on the readings expected. Assignments include an educational autobiography, a visit to court, weekly reflection papers, and an oral presentation coupled with a ten-page research paper on a topic having to do with civil rights (in the broadest sense).

FAIR 201A Critical & Reflective Inquiry

Credits: 5

Instructor: Miyake

Food, Culture, and Society: Prerequisite: Admission to Fairhaven College Students in this course will learn to examine both broad and specific issues in the relationships between food and community, society, culture, and identity through a social science perspective, asking questions such as: How can traditional foodways serve as an expression of cultural identity for a local or diasporic community? How do regional and global social, political, and economic forces impact the relationship between food and culture in local communities? What can the oral and folk histories of food practices within a community tell us about important cultural shifts related to political power, economic control, colonialism, and other central themes to the functioning of that community? Being focused on an elemental component of human survival, the study of food across multiple contexts provides a unique lens through which students can explore not only the practices and cultures of social groups from around the world, but also come to a fuller and more holistic understanding of their own food-related social and cultural practices and how these issues shape their own worlds and those of others around them. We will approach these issues through course readings and discussions as well as hands-on ethnographic fieldwork projects. Texts: Counihan, Carole. 2009. A Tortilla Is Like Life: Food and Culture in the San Luis Valley of Colorado. Austin, TX: University of Texas Press. Counihan, Carole, and Penny An Esterik, eds. 2018 (4th ed.). Food and Culture: A Reader. New York: Routledge. Fern ndez-Armesto, Felipe. 2003 Near a Thousand Tables: A History of Food. New York: Free Press. Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will take account of regular attendance, evidence of critical reading, engagement in class discussion and completion of assignments.

FAIR 201A Critical & Reflective Inquiry

Credits: 5

Instructor: Pierce

Salmon and Imperial Culture: Prerequisite: Admission to Fairhaven College Salmon have been described as a keystone species by ecologists and conservation biologists, a species that exists as a crucial hub in a network of ecological relations. Yet salmon are also an important nexus in which to understand cultural and political relations within the history of the United States as an industrial capitalist and settler colonial society. In this course we will use an interdisciplinary approach that draws from environmental history, critical indigenous studies, neoliberal studies, and scientific discourses to map the complexities associated with the life of salmon. Through our interdisciplinary inquiry of salmon, these relevant questions will guide us: How have salmon been understood and related to by indigenous and settler communities in the Salish Sea region? How did industrial fishing management and practices transform the way we think about and value salmon in U.S. culture and society? How should we understand the controversy surrounding the first genetically engineered animal (the aquadvantage salmon) made for human consumption by powerful aquaculture corporations? Finally, how do the debates and controversies around salmon aquafarming in the Salish Sea region offer ways to think about more just and sustainable futures for salmon and people while avoiding greater ecological and cultural devastation?

While engaging with interdisciplinary texts on exploring the life of salmon, this course also emphasizes critical reading and writing as a core concern. This means that our class will focus and have discussion on what it means to engage a text critically and how to best construct written arguments. Along with instructor feedback on each written assignment, students will also engage in peer-editing and working collaboratively on developing research questions for the final writing assignment.

Texts: Reading assignments will be distributed on canvas in pdf format. Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation in the course will be based on your engaged participation and attendance in the seminar, writing assignments including a research paper and presentation on your research. Students will also write a personal learning narrative and develop a writing plan by the end of the quarter that focuses on identifying and evaluating the strengths and areas of improvement in your writing.

FAIR 201A Critical & Reflective Inquiry

Credits: 5

Instructor: Friedland

Mythology: Prerequisite: Admission to Fairhaven College What are the origins of our beliefs and cultural narratives? In a world where arguably everything is made up of stories, it serves us well to investigate the underlying mythologies that spur their interpretations and assertions to truth. In this course we will focus both on the term 'mythology' as a narrative form/genre and a culturally specific assembly of origin stories. We will investigate interpretative tools that can re-contextualize myths and add new commentaries into existing discourses. As part of this exploration we will think about personal and collective mythologies that we each live by. How might we critically reflect and subvert some of these inheritances? What are some of the current mythologies that we see dominating our civic spaces, the media, and institutions? How might we question and further nuance their representation of reality? Over the course of the quarter, we will read three interpretative examples of the story of Antigone, originally written by Sophokles around 441 BC: Anne Carson's poetic translation, Antigonick, Sara Uribe's political assemblage, Antigona Gonzales, and Judith Butler's Antigone's Claim. Each version will reveal a specific interpretative tool and a critical framework for claiming ancient stories for new and necessary imaginations. Evaluation: You are expected to be present in class (more than two absences will result in not receiving credit). You will write a personal mythology, re-contextualize a myth to critically discuss a current issue, and write a research paper that looks at the larger sociopolitical and historical context of its emergence and also its evolution through time.

FAIR 201A Critical & Reflective Inquiry

Credits: 5

Instructor: Rowe

Information Overload: Prerequisite: Admission to Fairhaven College This section explores the information explosion, the need to critically evaluate competing messages, and the importance of developing effective expressions of our own views. We will consider the plethora of technological innovations for conveying our words and how we manage them (or do they manage us?). We will entertain concomitant themes of credibility, diversity, and relevance in what we take in and consider how to apply such concerns to our own writing. Our primary reading stimulates discussion with such questions as: Is free speech endangered on campus? Is American immigration working? Is the criminal justice system broken? What does marriage mean today? The essays written on different perspectives of these and other timely issues will help us hone our critical reading skills.

They will also serve as models for our own writing. Required Text: AMERICA NOW 12th ed., by Robert Atwan Recommended Text: A POCKET STYLE MANUAL, 2016 MLA Update Edition 7th ed., by Diana Hacker. Credit/Evaluation: Credit will be awarded based regular, punctual attendance, meaningful contribution to discussions, completion of several essays, and completion of a formal research paper suitable for inclusion in your Fairhaven writing portfolio.

FAIR 202A Core: Humanities/Express Arts

Credits: 5

Instructor: Feodorov

Art, Power and Resistance "Art is not a mirror to reflect reality, but a hammer with which to shape it" - Bertolt Brecht Throughout history, art has both adorned and justified the lifestyles of the rich and famous. From huge idealized statues of rulers to the often frilly paintings of 18th Century French Rococo, art has both pandered to and titillated the upper classes. However, it is a rash over-simplification to dismiss the entire history of Art as only catering to the tastes of the wealthy and powerful. In this combination seminar and studio class, we will not only investigate how art has been complicit with power, but also how artists and theorists create and advocate for art that critiques and resists systems of power and oppression, voices their experiences and identities, promotes and supports social change, and envisions alternative futures. Text: None, but required readings will be available on Canvas or online. Credit/Evaluation: Students will create 3 art projects based upon the themes discussed in class, write response papers to required readings and actively participate in class discussions on readings and art projects. Students will also give a presentation in class on an artist whose work fits within the theme of the course. Regular and punctual attendance is required. More than three unexcused absences will result in no credit being given.

FAIR 203A Social Relationshp/Responsibil

Credits: 5

Instructor: Lopez

Topic:  Justice as Healing: Indigenous view on the Justice System
 
This class explores theories of social norms through the lens of the Justice System. In this class, we will begin exploring theories and social norms behind our legal and political system, and our current laws. We will pay close attention to how social theories weave through our daily lives in complete anonymity while guiding our every step.  Students will engage with big questions about society – what we see as norms, their origins, and their current forms. We will learn about the legal process for arrest, prosecution, and imprisonment.  We will also learn about alternatives to our current system based on indigenous ways of Community Peacemaking and Restorative Justice. This class includes a tour of the Whatcom County Jail.
 
Required Texts:
Justice as Healing – Indigenous Ways. Writings on Community Peacemaking and Restorative Justice from the Native Law Center. Editor Wanda D McCaslin.
 
Other readings and videos as provided by instructor.

 

FAIR 203A Social Relationshp/Responsibil

Credits: 5

Instructor: Estrada

Social Identity:

This section will explore the process of social identity formation in the United States through the lens of modern social theory. The goal of the class is to explore multiple perspectives on the formation of the state, individual rights within society, equality as well as the roles and responsibilities of individuals within their respective communities. The focus of the class will concern itself with the roots and application of Western ideals of freedom and equity that arguably form the basis for the United States' liberal democracy. The seminar will outline the origins of the enlightenment and the basis for "natural" rights and freedoms in conjunction with the derived roles of society and government. We will then examine how the universalist ideals of the liberal enlightenment have implicitly or explicitly excluded those without property, people of color and women. We will also define what the "social compact" has meant in different periods of American history, and the relationship of various groups to this compact. Can liberal democracy really provide equal citizenship for workers, women and people of color? How have the movements of socialism, reconstruction, decolonization, ethnic identity and feminism tried to reformulate and transform the social order? Texts: SELECTED READINGS on John Locke and Adam Smith; C.Lemert, 4th ed., SOCIAL THEORY:THE MULTICULTURAL &CLASSIC READINGS (Jackson, TN: Perseus Books, 2010); R. D'Angelo & H. Douglas, 8th ed., TAKING SIDES: CLASHING VIEWS ON CONTROVERSIAL ISSUES IN RACE & ETHNICITY (NY: Mc Graw Hill, 2009); M.J. Sandel, JUSTICE: WHAT'S THE RIGHT THING TO DO (NY: Farrar, Strauss, Giroux, 2009); Recommended Reading: Zinn, H. PEOPLE'S HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES: 1492-PRESENT, (NY: Harper Collins, 2003) Credit/Evaluation: Credit will be granted for regular attendance, evidence of preparation, satisfactory completion of 2-3 written perspective papers in addition to a group term project and class group presentation. Criteria for evaluation include informed and active engagement in class discussions; informative, relevant group presentation and a term project paper that illustrates a sound grasp of social theory and critical paradigms.

FAIR 203A Social Relationshp/Responsibil

Credits: 5

Instructor: Haizlip

Analysis of the Individual: How does one become who they are? What makes the "I"? The purpose of this seminar is to investigate the influences of individual culture on the development of personality, cognition, behavior, and embodied psychosomatic consciousness. While culture is dynamic and multidimensional, through a somatic psychology paradigm, this course will examine the evolution of one's gender, sexual, racial/ethnic, and spiritual/religious identity development. Course topics will cover: White/Black/Latino/Asian Racial Identity Development, Queer Identity Development, Transgender Theories, and Spiritual/Religious Identity Development. This seminar course will rely on growth groups, interpersonal reflection activities, multimedia observation, academic debates, and consciousness raising groups. Students should expect deeply self-evaluative and reflective activities as the hallmark of every aspect of this course, as the primary goal of this course is personal growth. Essential Readings: A Class Manual of weekly articles will be prepared by the Instructor Dr. Breyan Haizlip. Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will take account of regular attendance (no more than three absences), as this course relies centrally on in-class growth group participation and out of class immersion activities. Students will also be assessed on evidence of critical reading, active, respectful, and thought-provoking engagement in class discussion, weekly video reflection journals that include personal observations regarding insights learned from the course, one in-depth 6-8 page Personal Development Paper, one Cultural Immersion Service Learning Project, and one final project presentation. There will be no course credit for anyone who misses more than three classes in the quarter.

FAIR 206A Core:Science/Our Plc on Planet

Credits: 5

Instructor: Herring

The scientific method has yielded most of the key technological advances of the last 200 years, and has expanded our understanding of the universe beyond the imaginations of our forebears. It has also enabled the exponential growth in population and resource use that currently strains our planetary capacity. In this course, we will explore the power and limitations of using science as a lens for addressing the most pressing environmental issues of the 21st century. The course will explore the origins and philosophies of science, using this as the basis for students to explore, in depth, case studies, around which much of the course will be organized. The first case study will explore the use of fossil fuels and the search for alternatives that are less damaging to the environment. Following this work, students will select case studies and branch out into teams. Students are expected to engage critically on their selected issues with their teammates and will be individually responsible for writing a chapter of their team's situation analysis. Possible case studies include: ocean acidification; sustainable food systems to feed the global population; global loss of biodiversity; or another case study selected by students. Finally, each team will develop an outreach and action plan, and take at least one concrete action before the end of the course. Students may choose among many options for this part of the course including (but not limited to) political action, artistic expression, education, performance, community service projects, etc. Text resources: What Science is and How it Works, Derry, 1999. Climate Change: What Everyone Needs to Know, Romm, 2015. These will be supplemented by various readings on Canvas. Evaluation of student work will be based on several factors, including -Active engagement and participation in the course (including attendance!) -

Demonstrated understanding of how scientists use the scientific method to test hypotheses, including collecting, interpreting, and analyzing quantitative data. -Demonstrated understanding of the power and limitations of the various methods used by scientists. -Completion of at minimum one concrete action step that addresses one of the case studies.

FAIR 210A World Issues

Credits: 5

Instructor: Akinrinade

We are citizens of the world. As global citizens, what do we know and understand about global issues and ourselves in a world faced with complex issues, such as growing economic disparities, fragile democracies, environmental degradation, wars and militarism, civil liberties, racial profiling, and globalization? How do we become intelligently informed? What is our awareness of and participation in local and global efforts for positive social change? This course explores the complex dynamics of our globalized world from a holistic, inter-disciplinary, and transnational perspective. Together we examine multiple world issues, such as global inequality and poverty, food security, human rights, water, energy, population growth, migration, cultural change, and public health, and our individual and community roles as agents of social change on local and global levels. This course is connected to the Wednesday World Issues Forum speaker series. Text: TBA; selected readings for each speaker on Canvas. Credit/Evaluation: Attendance (required); preparation for class; respectful, engaged participation in class; reading and speaker reflections; a final summary essay, and a social justice action. There will be no course credit for anyone who misses three (3) classes in the quarter.

FAIR 212C Intro Political Economy

Credits: 5

Instructor: O Murchu

What is political economy? How can we use political economy to understand and address local and global crises, including last decade's global financial crisis? This course will be a non-traditional problem centered introduction to the study of the economy, with the focus on Macroeconomics. Using a new open-source online textbook from world famous heterodox economists we will focus on: capitalism and history; technology; firms and workers; labor and labor markets; banks and money; markets and power; government and markets; unemployment; and government policy. This course will offer a deeper focus on real world problems and on social power relations in the determination of economic outcomes than a conventional introduction to economics.* This course is designed to help Fairhaven students explore the very real connections between economics, politics, history and public policy. * If you need a thorough grounding in microeconomics for further classes, I recommend ECON 206 Introduction to Microeconomics. Texts: On Sale in AS Bookstore The CORE Team, The Economy: Economics for a Changing World, New York: Oxford, 2017 or available as an open source Ebook at: http://www.core-econ.org/ Requirements for attendance: Faithful attendance, preparation and participation; in-class problem solving homework assignments; regular self or peer assessed homework; small final paper of your choice.

FAIR 218C The Hispano/A-American Exper

Credits: 4

Instructor: Estrada

Note: The course is cross-listed and meets with AMST 203 and Fairhaven students will be evaluated in the Fairhaven manner rather than receiving a final grade for the course. Students taking the Fairhaven section will be graded S/U and written self-evaluations will be required. This course will examine the socio-political, cultural and institutional structures directly impacting Chicano/a-Hispano-a populations within the United States and will provide an introduction to the historical and contemporary development of the Chicano/a community. An interdisciplinary approach will be taken as we focus on such topics as education, immigration, economic stratification as well as urbanization. Special emphasis will be given to the evolution of the roles of Xicanas as well as the development of social protest and social change within the barrio setting. Texts: FROM INDIANS TO CHICANOS: THE DYNAMICS OF MEXICAN AMERICAN CULTURE by Vigil; MASSACRE OF THE DREAMERS: ESSAYS ON XICANISMA by Castillo. Credit/Evaluation: The course will meet two times a week. Attendance is mandatory unless cleared by the instructor ahead of time or in the case of illness. The course will consist of lectures, discussions, videos and guest lecturers. Evaluation is based on participation in classroom discussions, two perspective papers, one midterm exam and a group term project paper and oral presentation.

FAIR 243U Embodied Mindfulness

Credits: 4

Instructor: Nichols

Embodied Mindfulness In this class, we will learn various practices of embodied mindfulness and sensory awareness, and ask whether and how they can influence the development of empathy, health and individual wellbeing. We all face difficult experiences, a guaranteed part of being alive. In response, human beings have developed a range of methods to deal with crises and negative life events. Recent research--spanning disciplines as diverse as bio-behavioral medicine, the cognitive and affective neurosciences, physics and psychology--have investigated the potential benefits of practicing mindfulness, including stress reduction, alleviation of emotional suffering, and strengthening of the immune system. Mindfulness and body/mind intelligence increasingly are also being understood as important factors in the development of improved mental health. Our methods will include an experiential approach, using practices from both disciplines of mindfulness and sensory awareness. We also will examine stress reduction from a personal approach. "Mindfulness means maintaining a moment-by-moment awareness of our thoughts, feelings, bodily sensations, and surrounding environment. Mindfulness also involves acceptance, meaning that we pay attention to our thoughts and feelings without judging them--without believing, for instance, that there's a 'right' or 'wrong' way to think or feel in a given moment. When we practice mindfulness, our thoughts tune into what we're sensing in the present moment rather than rehashing the past or imagining the future." --greatergood.berkeley.edu "To stop your mind does not mean to stop the activities of the mind. It means your mind pervades your whole body." - Shunryu Suzuki, Zen Texts: The Miracle of Mindfulness by Thich Nhat Hanh; Reclaiming Vitality and Presence: Sensory Awareness as a Practice for Life by Charlotte Selver, Tao Te Ching edited by Stephen Mitchell, and a range of published literature available through WWU via Canvas. Credit/Evaluation: Demonstration of learning will include consistent and regular attendance, in-class participation, and fulfillment of reading assignments. Answering reading questions for discussion and keeping a journal of personal observations regarding practices learned from the class. Two papers of at least 5 pages each, and one in-depth final project presentation.

FAIR 245 Theory/Structure in Pop Music

Credits: 4

Instructor: Sehman

This course will examine the fundamental concepts of music theory, including reading and writing musical notation, scales, intervals, triads, chord progressions, and musical structure. We will then take the crucial next step of applying theory, to understand how those techniques are used in context to create meaningful, expressive music. We will analyze songs in different styles and genres, chosen by both the instructor and students. The sheet music for these songs will be used as a means for analysis, to better understand the music theory and songwriting techniques used. Through analysis, written responses and discussion of songs, students will be encouraged to refine their ability to clearly and effectively communicate their ideas about music. Focus will also be given to the larger cultural context the songs and artists we examine exist within. A song has many internal structures and meanings. But importantly a song also looks outward, interacting with the culture it exists within. And this is fundamental to our understanding of that music. The goal of this course is to enrich our understanding of the music we interact with, whether it be as listeners, performers or songwriters. No experience with music theory or reading music notation is required. Text: Principles of Music, by Philip Lambert (Oxford University Press) Requirements/Evaluation: Students will be expected to complete all reading and listening assignments, and participate in class discussion that arise from these. There are will also be weekly music theory assignments. Students will analyze and present at least one song to the class during the quarter. Evaluation will be based on successful completion of material and active involvement.

FAIR 246 Mariachi Music/Perform&Culture

Credits: 3

Instructor: Miyake

This course is repeatable for up to a total of twelve (12) credits. Ever since its establishment as a centerpiece of Mexican popular culture in the first half of the 20th century, Mariachi music has acted both as a central expression of Mexican identity and also as one of the most widely recognized representations of Mexican people and culture for those outside of this community. Students in this class will explore this cultural and artistic movement through both academic engagement and hands-on experience in creating this music themselves. Class meetings will include sessions in which we will discuss academic and popular texts on Mariachi music and culture as well as participating in discussions with guest speakers and performers, and sessions in which class members will learn to perform Mariachi music in both individual and ensemble formats. No experience in performing Mariachi music is required for this class- all instruction and expected musical collaborations will be designed to fit the experience level of each individual student. Required Texts: Wade, Bonnie C. Thinking Musically: Experiencing Music, Expressing Culture. 3rd ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 2013. Sheehy, Daniel Edward. Mariachi Music in America: Experiencing Music, Expressing Culture. New York: Oxford University Press, 2006. Texts for this course will also include other articles, book chapters, and music as assigned by the instructor. NB: Alternate readings will be provided for students who have already received credit for this course in an earlier quarter Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will take account of regular attendance, evidence of critical reading, engagement in class discussion and completion of assignments.

FAIR 255Y Folk Music Experience

Credits: 2

Instructor: Miyake

Bluegrass This course combines playing traditional folk music with the study of the contexts in which folk music has evolved. For this quarter, the course will focus on the early history of bluegrass music. Students will be expected to participate in discussions on the book Bluegrass: A History by Neil Rosenberg during the first five weeks of the course. Each student will also be asked to introduce one song to the class that enriches our knowledge of bluegrass or the context within which bluegrass has been written and performed. Students will write a short research paper that forms the basis for their presentation on the song and its context. Students will also be responsible for learning and practicing the songs that are presented to the class, including practice in small groups. Students are encouraged to gain practice at playing one or more folk music instruments during the course, and are invited to join the course even if they are beginners at playing an instrument or if they prefer to just sing.

Texts will change from quarter to quarter. For the fall we will read Neil Rosenberg: Bluegrass: A History. Requirements for credits and criteria for evaluation: Regular attendance and participation in our weekly sing, informed participation in class discussions, one short research paper and song presentation, and practicing and performing music in a small group.

FAIR 258W Intro Acrylic Painting

Credits: 5

Instructor: Feodorov

If you could say it in words there would be no reason to paint. - Edward Hopper This studio art class will focus on the use of acrylic painting techniques and elements of form, composition and color using still life, photographs and memory to create a minimum of 4 paintings: 4 in-class and 4 outside of class. The goal is not to make "pretty pictures", but to learn to analyze, question and interpret what we see. Projects will stress not only the rendering of objects and figures, but also strategies for imbuing your paintings with meaning and insight. Students are required to work during and outside of class time while also maintaining a 40-page sketchbook. In addition, students will research and give a presentation to the class on an artist/painter whose work they admire and why. While some limited supplies will be provided, students must also purchase and bring their own arts supplies, such as acrylic paints, canvases or panels, brushes, rags, and plastic cups for water and mixing. A materials list will be emailed to registered students a week before the beginning of class. We will also plan a field trip to the Seattle Art Museum sometime during the quarter. Text: None, but occasional required readings will be assigned. Credit and evaluation: Credit is based upon regular and punctual attendance, participation in class discussions, and timely completion of all projects. Students are also required to share their studio projects during group feedback sessions.

FAIR 263B American Indian Experience

Credits: 4

Instructor: Rowe

Note: This class is cross-listed and meets with AMST 202. Materials fee: None. This course introduces the study of American Indians. It discusses the indigenous people of North America with a focus primarily on those within the settler state boundaries of the United States. Lectures and readings address Indian histories before and since the various European invasions but will focus on the history of Indians' relations with the United States. Course materials touch on current issues such as health, the environment, education and economic development. The course employs readings, lectures, discussion, films and experiential learning to meet its goal. Students will write short response papers, an essay on the assigned novel, and midterm and final exams. Texts: Required: Bruce E. Johansen, The Native Peoples of North America. James Welch, Fools Crow. Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation for purposes of granting credit will be based on regular attendance, meaningful participation in discussions, completion of assignments, completion of midterm and final exams, and quality of writing.

FAIR 270H Intro to Audio Recording

Credits: 4

Introduction to Audio explores the techniques, tools, and technology used in multi-track recording. From a beginner's perspective, this course works to develop the fundamental skills of critical listening, analog signal flow, and basic analog/digital hybrid recording. By examining the various steps in the recording process students will learn the concepts and skills necessary to use studio equipment such as microphones (their characteristics and placement), mixing consoles (explained in detail), hard disk recording, patch bays, signal and effect processors, and headphone systems. Each student is also expected to attend a weekly two-hour small group lab, held in the studio, giving the student a chance to experience multi-track recording in a hands-on manner. Texts: Modern Recording Techniques (9th edition) by David Miles Huber and selected readings from The Audio Expert by Ethan Winer. Excerpts from the Audio Expert text will be available online. Credit/Evaluation: Students will be evaluated through a combination of participation, attendance (lab and lecture), reading assignments, and understanding gained from the material evaluated from a hands-on assessment. Additionally, students will be required to complete a basic tracking session with their lab assistant in the studio as a final project.

FAIR 303A Core:Intrdisc Cncntrtn Sem

Credits: 5

Instructor: Brown

Prerequisites: FAIR 101A, FAIR 201A, FAIR 203A, FAIR 305A What questions do you want to explore in your Interdisciplinary Concentration? (Are you asking questions, for example, about inequalities, ecology, musical cultures, or performance?) Why are these questions important enough intellectually, politically, socially or professionally to form the basis for your Interdisciplinary Concentration? Your challenge in the Concentration Seminar is a two- or three-fold one. First, you must answer the question of why your concentration matters to your own satisfaction. Second, you want to communicate the reasons why your concentration's questions matter to the mythical "average reader" in your rationale. Third, you must identify the set of courses, independent study projects, internships, or other forms of experiential learning that allow you to explore your underlying questions about your subject in the rest of your time at Fairhaven College. In practical terms, the seminar is designed to assist you with your development and writing of an interdisciplinary concentration. It will serve as a forum for discussion, guidance, and support during the proposal writing process. You will work collaboratively with your seminar, your instructor, and your concentration committee, to write your learning proposal and identify relevant courses and experiences to help you achieve your educational goals. Here are some of the practical questions this seminar will help to address: - What are the appropriate guidelines and requirements involved? - What exactly is it you want to achieve in your degree? - How can your intentions be given effective shape and form? - Who should be on your committee? - How do the parts of your concentration work together conceptually? - What are the best vehicles for your learning? - What should you put in and what should you leave out of your concentration? Text: Handbook on Canvas + Occasional Readings distributed in class Credit/Evaluation: Faithful preparation for and attendance at seminar; Steady work on your proposal; Contributions to the development of your group members' proposals. Credit for the course is granted when your completed committee-approved proposal has been filed with the Fairhaven Records Office and a regular self-evaluation form is submitted to the instructor.

FAIR 305A Writing and Transition Conference

Credits: 3

Prerequisites: FAIR 101A, FAIR 201A The Writing Portfolio and Transition Conference are Core graduation requirements for all Fairhaven College students. Your Writing Portfolio will be a selective collection of your academic writing and an introductory statement of self-assessment about your writing at this point in your education. It will be reviewed and assessed by your Fairhaven faculty advisor. Your Transition Conference is a constructive mid-point conversation with advising resource people you invite to share your educational plans and collect advice officially moving you from the "Exploratory" stage of Fairhaven's program into the "Concentrated" stage of your educational plans, regardless of your choice of major. You should embark on these requirements when you and your faculty advisor agree you're ready for them. This is not a class, however you must attend one orientation meeting early in the quarter. Details about the orientation meeting schedule will be sent to all enrolled students via email and posted on the FAIR 305a class CANVAS site. In order to receive credit for FAIR305a you must: 1) Submit your Writing Portfolio prepared according to specifications to be provided at our orientation and on our class Canvas site. 2) Schedule and conduct a Transition Conference which includes writing and circulating a Transition Conference Statement to your invited participants prior to the conference. Additional details and instructions will be provided at our orientation and on our class Canvas site.

FAIR 311B The American Legal System

Credits: 5

Instructor: Lopez

American Legal Systems--Reproductive Rights An in-depth look at the American legal system and how it affects individuals and society, with coverage of legal vocabulary, sources of law, the structure of the government, the Supreme Court and the judicial system. The structure and evolving nature of the legal system, legal reasoning and the role of courts in government. Case analysis skills will be stressed, including identifying the issue, procedural history, facts, reasoning and holding of each case. This class is required for the Law, Diversity and Justice concentration and minor. It should serve as a foundation for students interested in the legal system. Learning Objectives: Examination of the role and importance of the judicial system in government, including federal, state and tribal legal systems, with an emphasis on the U.S. Supreme Court. Critical thinking skills stressed, including an analysis of how systemic inequalities may be replicated by the existing legal systems Introduction to common law and the doctrine of stare decisis by following a line of precedent on a specific theme. -Introduction to writing case briefs with an ability to identify procedural history, issue(s), analysis, holding(s) and dicta -Introduction to civil law and criminal law -Basic legal vocabulary -Introduction to legal database Lexis/Nexis -Public presentation skills Texts: Class Manual of case readings prepared by Instructor; Barron's Law Dictionary Credit and Evaluation: No more than THREE absences will be allowed if you want credit for this class. Active and informed class participation will be expected. Assignments will include oral presentations on Supreme Court Justices, weekly case briefs and worksheets, an 8-10 page research paper.

FAIR 323G Strange Fictions

Credits: 4

Instructor: Friedland

Strange Fictions

We need the books that affect us like a disaster, that grieve us deeply. A book must be the axe for the frozen sea inside of us. --Franz Kafka In this class we will follow H‚lЉne Cixous's three steps on the ladder of writing, visiting the school of the dead, the school of dreams and the school of roots. It is in these spaces that we initiate ourselves into the strange science of writing. Strange because we will approach the unclassifiable, the silent, the disaster in forms that appropriately mirror their logic; writing that is not necessarily bound to genre, plot or character development but which, at heart, attempts to avow complex forms of perception and existence. We will apprentice writers such as Fleur Jaeggy, Clarice Lispector, and Unica ZЃrn who descend and trespass, whose novels are also philosophical tracts, biographies that are part fictitious, and stories written as poems. As we explore these hybrid forms in our readings, we will experiment with different writing techniques and prompts to elicit our own as-yet-unknown narratives. To that end, be prepared to risk and explore experiential modalities.

Evaluation: You are expected to be present during our in-class sessions, and come prepared to discuss weekly readings, give peer-feedback and share your own work. Over the course of the quarter you will revise several pieces and compile a final portfolio for review. You will also present your own explorations as part of H‚lЉne Cixous' three steps of writing. Texts: H‚lЉne Cixous's: Three Steps on the Ladder of Writing; Fleur Jaeggy: These Possible Lives; Clarice Lispector: The Hour of the Star; Selah Saterstrom: The Pink Institution; Unica ZЃrn: Dark Spring.

FAIR 334C International Human Rights

Credits: 5

Instructor: Akinrinade

Prerequisite: FAIR 203A International Human Rights Description: This course examines the idea of human rights, its historical, philosophical and legal origins. It explores the notion of universal rights and examines the relativity debate. It will introduce students to rights that are guaranteed and selective substantive rights will be examined - civil and political rights; economic, social and cultural rights, and other classes of rights. Other considerations include national, regional and international institutions created to supervise implementation of and compliance with those rights. It will also consider the role of non-governmental organizations and activists who seek to enforce human rights. Text: TEXTBOOK ON INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS, by Smith, Rhona K. M. Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will take account of regular attendance, evidence of critical reading, engagement in class discussion, the quality of short reactions, and two assignments. There will be no course credit for anyone who misses three (3) classes in the quarter.

 

FAIR 334P Field Studies: Biol of Soil

Credits: 4

Biology of Soil

Soil is alive! This course explores biologically-mediated processes in soil and the multiple functions of soil biota in both managed and unmanaged ecosystems. Throughout the quarter we will examine the primary communities of organisms that make up the soil food web. Using lectures, readings, discussion and hands-on demonstration at WWU's Outback Farm, students will evaluate the critical role these organisms play in soil productivity and resiliency and their effects on chemical and physical properties. Areas of inquiry include soil taxonomy, soil quality, nutrient cycles in soils and soil food web interactions. We will spend several weeks reviewing and assessing biological soil quality indicators on the Outback's soil which will culminate in a group soil analysis report. Applied soil ecology concepts, like bioremediation, biological disease control, and composting will also be highlighted. Field trips will include a visit to a local vegetable farm and an anaerobic digester project.

REQUIRED TEXTS:Dirt: The Erosion of Civilization by David R Montgomery; Building Better Soils for Better Crops 3rd Edition by Fred Magdoff Harold Van Es (free download available); Comprehensive Assessment of Soil Health--The Cornell Framework (free download available); Additional readings, articles, and information will be provided on CANVAS.

LEARNING OUTCOMES: >Identify soil organisms and understand their function in soil >Define soil health and its applications in agriculture and natural ecosystems >Relate biologically mediated processes in soil to environmental resilience >Evaluate the role of soil biology in applied soil ecology concepts EVALUATION: Participation in discussions and demonstration activities, completion of i) weekly response papers ii) Outback Farm soil analysis group project iii) Mid-term take home exam and iv) Individual research paper and presentation due at the end of the quarter.

FAIR 335C Multicultural Psychology

Credits: 5

Instructor: Delucio

Prerequisite: FAIR 203A Description: Multicultural Psychology is a field that seeks to understand how variability among different cultural groups within the U.S. can offer insight into viable models of everyday experiences. We will explore how multiculturalism is viewed as a fourth "force" in psychology and how it impacts both research and applied aspects in the field. Historically, multicultural psychology has had a primary focus on racial identity within the U.S. context. However, there is increasing recognition of the need to understand how social identities exist in relation to one another; as such, we will examine the intersections between race, gender, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, ability, and other social/marginalized group memberships. We will be examining questions such as the following: What is multiculturalism and what does it take to define something as "multicultural"? How does someone's intention factor in when considering the impact of race-related comments? What are possible impacts of stereotypes on academics, employment, and parenting? In addition, we will explore differences in worldviews (e.g., individualism v. collectivism), means of communication, cultural identity development, acculturation, ways to build multicultural competence, and critiques of the field. Emphasis will be placed on empirical research and psychological theory, aimed at helping you develop competence and knowledge when discussing many real-word examples and events. Required Texts: Mio, J., Barker, L., & Domenech-Rodriguez, M. (Eds.). (2015). Multicultural psychology: Understanding our diverse communities (4th ed.). Oxford University Press. Tatum, B. D. (2017). Why are all the Black kids sitting together in the cafeteria? And other conversations about race (2nd ed). Basic Books: New York. Additional readings will be uploaded to Canvas Recommended Resources: American Psychological Association. (2010). Publication manual of the American psychological association (6th ed.). Washington, D.C.: American Psychological Association. Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will include regular attendance (i.e., no more than 3 absences); active and engaged participation in class discussions; facilitating discussion about an assigned article; 2 reflective papers; a final literature review about a topic related to multicultural psychology.

FAIR 336B Inside/Outside: Borders

Credits: 4

Inside/Outside: Borders as Sites and Symbols of Power

Faculty: Lourdes Gutierrez

This class provides an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the formation, maintenance and endurance of borders and boundaries. It asks: What are borders? What purpose do borders serve? Why do they endure? Since there is no single agreed upon definition of “borders” we explore three main dimensions of borders as symbolic, geopolitical and cultural boundaries. In so doing we analyze their multiple dimensions as territorial entities, legal demarcations, institutions, sites and symbols of power, racial and ethnic boundaries, liminal spaces, and metaphorical constructs. As we gain deeper understanding we will see that borders, no matter what form they may take, are used to separate nations, people, spaces, in such a way that difference is imbued with power. Course readings engage scholars from multiple disciplines including anthropology, geography, history, political science and sociology, with cases studies from around the globe including Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, and the U.S.  Foundational readings (available on Canvas) include scholarship by Frederik Barth, Hastings Donnan and Thomas M. Wilson, Roxanne Doty, Michelle Lamont, Joseph Nevins, and Dan Rabinowitz.

This class will be conducted in a combination lecture/seminar format focusing on a detailed discussion of the required texts and questions provided in the syllabus. Lecture will provide necessary background for each set of readings, while discussion will allow students to think critically about the diverse issues presented by the lecture and readings.

Credit/Evaluation:  Students are expected to be active discussion participants and co-facilitators throughout the term.  Course assignments and requirements include regular participation and attendance, submission of critical questions for discussion, reading journals, a short essay assignment, a group visual project and group paper, and a final narrative self-evaluation.

Prerequisite: FAIR 203A Social Relationships and Responsibilities

FAIR 336B Psy Love, Lust, & Attraction

Credits: 5

Instructor: Haizlip

The Psychology of Love, Lust, & Attraction Course Description: Why do we love who we love... and why do we like who we like? Relationships are, arguably, a fundamental component of our quality of life; they have the potential to greatly enhance or undermine psychological, spiritual, and physical health. As such, this course is an exploration of the psychology of close human relationships, via the study of love, lust, and human attraction. Although we will be primarily learning about intimate (i.e., romantic) relationships, we will also discuss friendships and familial relationships, as well as the places where these two kinds of relationships intersect, and the ways in which they interact. Examples of topics in this course include the biological bases of attraction and love, relationship formation and dissolution, relational interaction patterns, relationship satisfaction, and the social context of relationships (e.g., the influence of others). Students will have an opportunity to explore relationships through readings in the popular press and multimedia outlets, scholarly, critical examination of the scientific literature will serve as the foundation of our learning throughout the course. Students will find that the literature contains unexpected findings that can change the way you look at relationships, both from academic and applied, "real-life" perspectives. The goals of this course are to: (1) provide students with a comprehensive overview of the research in relationship psychology and of its underlying theories, and (2) to help students learn to effectively apply, both theoretically and practically, the knowledge that is acquired from the course. Weekly discussions and the short reflection assignments are intended to facilitate this process. This seminar course will rely on growth groups, interpersonal reflection activities, multimedia observation, academic debates, and consciousness raising groups. Students should expect deeply self-evaluative and reflective activities as the hallmark of every aspect of this course, as the primary goal of this course is personal growth through critical inquiry. Essential Readings: A Class Manual of weekly articles will be prepared by the Instructor Dr. Breyan Haizlip. Credit/Evaluation: Evaluation will take account of regular attendance (no more than three absences), as this course relies centrally on in-class growth group participation and out-of-class immersion activities. Students will also be assessed on evidence of critical reading, active, respectful, and thought-provoking engagement in class discussion, weekly video reflection journals that include personal observations regarding insights learned from the course, one in-depth 3-5 page Personal Development Paper, one Service Learning Project, and one final project presentation. There will be no course credit for anyone who misses more than three classes in the quarter.

 

FAIR 336B Science Fiction Films

Credits: 5

Instructor: Takagi

Science Fiction Films In 1902, Georges M‚liЉs produced a short film called "A Trip to the Moon," which tells of a group of scientists who, using a cannon to launch their rocket ship, visit the moon and meet its local inhabitants. 107 years later, it is the extraterrestrials who come to visit and reside on earth, as captured in the film "District 9." Though separated by an entire century of technological advancements in filmmaking, including computerized images, special makeup, and sound (to name a few), these two films are quite similar. They are a part of the science fiction genre that involves "a situation that could not arise in the world we know, but which is hypothesized on the basis of some innovations in science or technology, or pseudo-science or pseudo-technology, whether human or extraterrestrial in origin." (Kinglsey Amis, New Maps of Hell). In this class, we will watch classic and new science films and learn the history of the science fiction genre (and how it differs from horror films), scholarly interpretations of science fiction movies and we will discover how these films reflect the anxieties, fears, and concerns of American society at the time they were released. Beginning with the 1902 classic by Georges M‚liЉs, this class might include screenings of "Destination Moon," "2001: A Space Odyssey," "Andromeda Strain," "Blade Runner," "Brother From Another Planet," "The Matrix" and "District 9." Required reading: Possible text: Vivian Sobchack, Screening Space: The American Science Fiction Film Articles on Canvas Other requirements: -5 (4 pages) Short analyses of the films -1 (5-8 page) research paper on a film of your choice -Help lead a discussion on one of the films -Informed participation in class discussions -Regular, punctual attendance.

 

FAIR 336N Cooking, Cuisine &Sustain Food

Credits: 4

Instructor: Tuxill

Cooking, Cuisine and Sustainable Food This course starts with the premise that our personal health and the ecological health of our planet both depend upon what happens in the kitchen. We will explore the science and culture of food preparation and preservation, with a goal of understanding how culinary traditions and scientific knowledge can inform contemporary ideas about cooking and eating.

Along the way we also will gain and share the basic kitchen literacy needed to make timely, delicious meals--and to make healthy, ecologically sound food a vital part of our busy modern American lives.

Texts: COOKED by Michael Pollan. Other readings will be drawn from a broad range of academic and applied literature and distributed via Canvas.

Credit/Evaluation: Regular attendance and informed contribution to discussions and in-class cooking is essential. Students also will 1) keep a food journal; 2) research, write, and present a study of the natural history of a particular food ingredient, dish, or culinary technique; 3) participate in a group project on food system sustainability analysis; and 4) contribute to a class recipe collection.

 

 

FAIR 336V Nature Drawing

Credits: 4

Instructor: S'eiltin

Nature Drawing This course introduces the historical and contemporary use of nature as a source for artistic inspiration. Students will develop drawing ideas based on observation of natural phenomena and understanding of cultural and social significance of nature. Through the exploration of specific subjects (the human body, botanical studies, landscape forms and weather) students will learn to integrate forms and content in drawing. Design principles such as scale, form, value and color theory will be emphasized. In addition to traditional drawing, students will be encouraged to use of a wide variety of mediums and experimental techniques. Students will complete 5 finished drawings, related art statements, 20 preliminary sketches and 50 exploratory entries in a journal/sketchbook. Students will be evaluated on the timely completion of all assignments, attendance, participation in class critiques, workshops and discussions. Students must maintain a strong commitment to their creative endeavors throughout the quarter.

 

FAIR 336V Fabric Cultural Activism

Credits: 4

Instructor: S'eiltin

Fabric Cultural Activism The most innovative art of the past decade has been created outside conventional galleries and museums. Artists operating at the intersection of art and cultural activism have been developing new forms of collaboration with diverse audiences and communities. Their projects have addressed such issues as mass consumption and production and recycling practices in developed countries. Provocative, accessible, and engaging art is at the center and situates socially conscious projects historically, relates them to key issues in postcolonial art theory, and offers a unique critical framework for understanding them. Fabric (dress and fashion) will serve as metaphor for questions concerning mass production, distribution and consumption. Repurposing of corporate signage in developing countries, as well as many other topics relating to dress, culture and privilege will be explored, researched, discussed and realized in visual statements. Assignments: Workshops in hand sewing techniques, pattern and garment construction and repurposing techniques will inspire the creation of four to five required projects. Presentations of artists who create dress and or adornment, or other art forms as social statements will be required of each student. Presentations must be 10 - 15 minutes long. A sketchbook/journal is an essential tool in generating ideas; students are required to make numerous entries throughout the quarter. Students must come to class fully prepared to work on their projects. Supplies must be purchased in advance; sketches must represent thoughtful planning and the willingness to experiment. Required Texts: Margaret Maynard, Dress and Globalisation, Manchester University Press, NY, 2004 Livingstone, Ploof, ed., "The Object of Labor, Art, Cloth and Cultural Production", The MIT Press, 2007 Highly Recommended Text:

Sandra Bardwell, "Sewing Basics, All you Need to Know About Machine and Hand Sewing" Stewart Tabori & Chang, NY Suggested Text:

Editors: Firat, Kuryel, Cultural Activism, Practices, Dilemmas, and Possibilities, Thamyris Intersecting No. 21, the Netherlands, 2011 Editors: Paulicelli, Clark, The Fabric of Cultures, Fashion, Identity and Globalization, Routledge, London and N.Y., 2009 Evaluation of student learning will be based on the following: student's ability to apply content of class to the creation of four or five projects, the completion of all assignments in a timely manner and the willingness and ability to imagine, problem solve, and take creative risks, and make positive contributions to the overall learning environment of the class. Consistent attendance is essential in this studio class as there will be many demonstrations and workshops that will enable students to make significant progress on their projects. More than three unexcused absences will result in 0 credits.

 

FAIR 370I Introduction to Pro Tools

Credits: 4

Introduction to Pro Tools Prerequisites: 270H (before or during) or permission of instructor This class will introduce students to mixing and editing audio with Avid's Pro Tools 12 software. Covered topics will include: importing and recording audio into Pro Tools, editing and manipulating performances, MIDI, the use of plug-ins, and an overview of mixing processes such as compression/limiting, dithering and equalization. As this is primarily a mixing class, having already recorded material is useful but not required. Students will be expected to attend class regularly and demonstrate critical listening skills through critique of their classmates' work. Additionally, the Fairhaven Mixing Suite will be available for use all quarter and required for certain projects. Texts: Reprinted materials. Credit/Evaluation: Projects will be evaluated throughout the quarter by the instructor and the other members of the class.

FAIR 370J Studio Recording

Credits: 4

Instructor: Fish

Studio Recording Prerequisite: FAIR 370I or FAIR 370P Studio Recording I takes the concepts introduced in Intro to Audio and Intro to Pro Tools and allows the student to apply and practice them in a hands-on manner, with the goal of becoming familiar with and competent in the use of the equipment in the Champion St Studio. Students will complete at least four multi-track recording projects and will have the opportunity to work on other recording sessions as well. Through the students' work on these projects they will learn efficiency and speed in the techniques of tracking, overdubbing, and mixdown sessions. The recording projects will be evaluated by the instructor as well as the other students in the class. This course will also involve development of critical listening skills as well as the creative and imaginative expression possible in audio recording. Students will keep a detailed journal of their session work. This is a Pro Tools based course and enrolled students will gain access to the Fairhaven Studio, Mixing Suite, and Champion St Studios. Texts: The Recording Engineer's handbook (3rd edition) by Owsinski Credit/Evaluation: Each student must finish the assigned projects which will be critiqued by the instructor and peers based on sound quality, balance, clarity and realization. Overall evaluation will be made based on effort, participation and growth as an engineer.

FAIR 370K Advanced Studio Recording

Credits: 4

Instructor: Fish

Advanced Studio Recording Prerequisite: FAIR 370J or FAIR 370H This class will give students with advanced recording experience the opportunity to record and mix on an industry standard Pro Tools 12 HD system. Students will enhance their knowledge of Pro Tools and learn how to use this software in conjunction with a large-format analog mixing console. Topics such as drum sample replacement, audio quantization, convolution impulse responses, spectrum analysis, DSP processing and other advanced topics will be covered. Students will be expected to conduct at least three recording/mixing sessions throughout the quarter and prepare a final portfolio for in-class critique. Students will also learn how to properly configure Pro Tools HD hardware and software components, how to setup session templates and how to utilize each component of an HD/analog system. Enrolled students will gain access to the Fairhaven Studio, Mixing Suite, and Champion St Studios. Texts: Reprinted materials Credit/Evaluation: Projects will be evaluated throughout the quarter by the instructor and the other members of the class.

FAIR 371B Palestinian Film

Credits: 5

Instructor: O Murchu

Palestinian and Israeli Cinema Prereqs: FAIR 203a or Instructor Permission Keywords: Nationalism, Film Studies, Neo-Formalism, Video essays The Israel-Palestine conflict is probably one of the most written about ethno-national conflict in the world. Unsurprisingly, Israeli and Palestinian directors have created national cinemas in tandem with the creation of the Israeli and Palestinian nations. In this course, we'll try to step away from the conventional historical political analysis of the conflict and look at it sideways and culturally through the narrative responses, interventions, and explorations of Israeli and Palestinian filmmakers. In particular, we examine the works of the four of the most successful Palestinian narrative cinema directors - Hany Abu-Assad, Annmarie Jacir, Rashid Masharawi, and Elia Suleiman - and the ways in which they use space and comedy to tell contemporary Palestinian stories. Class time is structured to screen one or two feature movies each week, and to hold longer video editing training workshops. We will work with Fairhaven's media manager Mark Miller to train ourselves to make video essays. In two student teams, we will practice a variety of formal video editing and essaying exercises on the movies we watch: 1) a videographic pechakucha; 2) an unscripted voiceover; 3) an alternative trailer; 4) a multiscreen composition; and 5) a videographic epigraph. After we collectively experiment videographically on a set of five films, students will be encouraged to create their own video essays as final term projects. Texts: For purchase at the AS Bookstore & available through Western Library: -James Gelvin, The Israel-Palestine Conflict: One Hundred Years of War. 3rd Edition. New York: Cambridge, 2014. -Christian Keathley and Jason Mittell. The Videographic Essay: Criticism in Sound and Image. 1st edition. Montreal: caboose, 2016. Selected chapters and essays by Nadia Yacub, Hamid Dabashi, Terri Ginsburg, Nurith Gertz and George Khleifi, Kamal Abdel-Malek and other authors are available online through Western Library as Ebook Chapters or through article databases. Links will be posted on canvas. Credit/Evaluation: Faithful preparation and attendance, and informed, regular participation. Attempt five formal video editing exercises. A research paper or video essay on Israeli or Palestinian filmmaker or film of your choice.

FAIR 375S Business Plans/Social Entrepnr

Credits: 4

Instructor: Coulet du Gard

This course examines business plans for social entrepreneurship (small business and nonprofit structures), emphasizing socially responsible and sustainable systems. Have you ever dreamed of starting your own business or becoming part of a team to create a nonprofit organization? Have you ever wondered why so many small businesses and new nonprofits fail? This course is a practical course analyzing and applying step-by-step the major processes in creating a solid plan for social entrepreneurship success. Students interested in pursuing a career in the nonprofit world, creating their own nonprofit, or establishing a for-profit business will be required to create a business plan by the end of the quarter. Emphasis will be placed on US systems, although the course will also provide a few examples from international social entrepreneurship. Canvas documents comprise a part of the readings/videos. Course Requirements -Design, formulate and write a complete business plan -discussions in class: identify basic components of a business plan and analyze case studies of for-profit and non-profit business plans; assess socially

responsible and environmentally sound organizations -Attendance required (no more than 3 classes missed) Texts and Materials: Required: 1. Schofield, Rupert The Social Entrepreneurship Handbook 2011 2. Lee, Jennifer The Right-Brain Business Plan: A Creative, Visual Map for Success, 2011

3. Canvas documents and links Recommended Bornstein, David and Susan Davis Social Entrepreneurship: What Everyone Needs to Know, 2010 available free online via WWU library

FAIR 380A Music Production Using Reason

Credits: 4

Instructor: Sehman

Music Production Using Reason Prerequisite: FAIR 270H Sound Design and Composition Using Reason -Please note: No experience is necessary with music composition, music production or the software, Reason. This course intends to engage students at whatevever experience level they enter. This course will focus on creating music using the software, Reason. We will learn the essential operations of that program, with the goal of empowering students to create music of any style and form, be it pop songs, experimental sound works, beat making, ambient music, or spoken word pieces. By the end of this course students will have a portfolio of 4-5 compositions. This course will also focus on the creative process and how it relates to music production. As a group we will explore common practices, workflow and roadblocks in the creative process, with the goal of strengthening each class member's individual creative voice. Topics will include: -Modular synthesis: Learning the essentials of oscillators, filters, LFOs, and ADSR envelopes in order to create a personal sound language. -Using pre-composed loops as an empowering tool to supplement compositional technique and language. -Incorporating samples into music: to expand or comment on the work of other artists, or perhaps to

incorporate the voices of important figures (e.g. the speeches of Martin Luther King, Jr.) -Song orchestration: an examination of the functional and timbral layers of a song, and how they work

to create the total sonic entity of a song. -Song structure: a study of the linear construction of music as a way to create a meaningful narrative and flow. -The fundamentals of beat making: examining drum machines, step sequencers, and the basic kick/snare/high hat texture of representative drum beat styles. Text: Making Music: Creative Strategies for Electronic Music Producers, by Dennis Desantis. Requirements/Evaluation: Students will complete 4-5 music composition projects. Students will be expected to actively pursue musical creation in this class. Evaluation will be based on the student's active involvement with their own work and engagement with the class, not the style or skill level of their creative work.

FAIR 381G Big History & Creative Writing

Credits: 5

Instructor: Simon

Big History and Social Change Big History is the study of the grand sweep of cosmic, terrestrial, and human history. While traditional history begins with the advent of written records, about 5,000 to 6,000 years BP (Before Present), Big History begins at the beginning of the universe, with the Big Bang. Big Historians use humanities-based storytelling to piece together the sum of human knowledge about the origins of the universe, of galaxies and stars, of our solar system, our home planet Earth, the evolution of life on earth and of our species, Homo sapiens, and the story of humans and our culture - of hunter-gatherers, agrarians, civilizations and cities, and our current global industrial society. Big History allows us to recognize patterns that recur across time and space, and in the fabric of the universe itself. When we look at Deep Time in this way, we can gain a broader understanding of cause and effect across 13.8 billion years of history - contextualizing problems that we face now on the planetary and on the human scale, in ways that can allow us to transcend existing ideological frames. In this course, we will study at least one Big History account, and we may respond to it with various forms of writing - poetry, fiction, essay, journal. Thus, we will craft a Big History lens, through which we might examine social problems that humans face in our time. We'll work to understand the deep causes of human problems and seek solutions that address these issues at their roots in the long arc of our human story. Credit/evaluation: regular homework assignments, written works, class discussion, final paper and/or presentation. Texts: A Big History account such as David Christian's Origin Story: A Big History of Everything, additional readings.

FAIR 403A Advanced Seminar

Credits: 4

Instructor: Calderon

ANNE TREAT, Spring 2007 grad, said: "There is no possible way I can give justice to the complexity of experiences, triumphs, pitfalls and challenges of my academic career in the course of this paper. This artifact of self-reflection is simply a pause in the broader conversation of my academic journey, an invitation for me to mindfully articulate the ways those things I've studied, read, discussed and experienced over the past four years have informed and challenged my personal development, and how I've chosen to integrate and express that knowledge through the actions of my life" This seminar is a wonderful opportunity to reflect on what you have been up to all these years of being educated--through writing, conversation, presentations, and listening to each other. You will read and discuss a book and other readings, co-facilitating at least one discussion; write and share a variety of short writing assignments, designed to help you complete your Summary and Evaluation, and provide a supportive community in which to summarize and critically reflect upon your Fairhaven (or Life) education. Each student will also present or teach something to the class from the heart of his or her educational experience. This course is one of our favorites to teach at Fairhaven because we learn so much about our students, and the many intriguing, complex, deep, creative and quirky ways there are to be human and to become educated. The class also illustrates the value of writing as a process of discovery, synthesis and meaning. We will all do our best to help you express most clearly what your education has been about, and are honored to learn from your stories, your minds, your creativity, and your lives. The course will be as significant as you make it. Be honest. It is your life, your education, so let us understand what it has meant and what it really means to you now.

FAIR 403A Advanced Seminar

Credits: 4

Instructor: Delucio

ANNE TREAT, Spring 2007 grad, said: "There is no possible way I can give justice to the complexity of experiences, triumphs, pitfalls and challenges of my academic career in the course of this paper. This artifact of self-reflection is simply a pause in the broader conversation of my academic journey, an invitation for me to mindfully articulate the ways those things I've studied, read, discussed and experienced over the past four years have informed and challenged my personal development, and how I've chosen to integrate and express that knowledge through the actions of my life" This seminar is a wonderful opportunity to reflect on what you have been up to all these years of being educated--through writing, conversation, presentations, and listening to each other. You will read and discuss a book and other readings, co-facilitating at least one discussion; write and share a variety of short writing assignments, designed to help you complete your Summary and Evaluation, and provide a supportive community in which to summarize and critically reflect upon your Fairhaven (or Life) education. Each student will also present or teach something to the class from the heart of his or her educational experience. This course is one of our favorites to teach at Fairhaven because we learn so much about our students, and the many intriguing, complex, deep, creative and quirky ways there are to be human and to become educated. The class also illustrates the value of writing as a process of discovery, synthesis and meaning. We will all do our best to help you express most clearly what your education has been about, and are honored to learn from your stories, your minds, your creativity, and your lives. The course will be as significant as you make it. Be honest. It is your life, your education, so let us understand what it has meant and what it really means to you now.

FAIR 412E Adv Top Law: Domestic Violence

Credits: 5

Instructor: Helling

Domestic Violence Prerequisite: FAIR 311B or PLSC 311 Using a law school textbook, we will explore the ways in which the American legal system responds (or doesn't respond) to domestic violence.

Why is there so much violence within homes?

Has the criminal justice system learned to take this violence seriously? Which responses are effective and which are not? The teacher is a passionate former domestic violence prosecutor who handled thousands of DV cases in a major metropolitan area. We will look at criminal law through the reading of court cases.

We will also look at civil law and the process of getting orders for protection. This course is particularly suited to anyone interested in domestic violence, the criminal justice system or going to law school.

You do NOT need to be a Fairhaven student to take this course.

You do need to be able to do your share of the work in this advanced legal seminar. Please complete the readings in advance of class. You will need to take notes on the readings so you are fully prepared to discuss them in class.

No more than 3 absences allowed if you want to get credit. Texts: Schneider, Hanna, Sack, and Greenberg's Domestic Violence and the Law, 3d ed. (This is a law school textbook and thus it is, unfortunately, quite expensive--but it's a great textbook) Any legal dictionary (Barron's is recommended) Credit/evaluation: active and informed participation by keeping up with the heavy reading load, no more than three absences, three short papers reacting to the text, and one seven-page research paper on your choice of topics involving domestic violence and the law (followed by an oral presentation to the class on the topic). Students will also observe local courts on a regular basis for the fifth hour of credit (4 classroom hours + 1 hour arranged).

FAIR 413E Curers,Client,Culture:Hlth/Ill

Credits: 5

Instructor: Coulet du Gard

Prerequisite: cross cultural study or instructor's permission This course examines health belief systems in cross-cultural perspective, including the roles of practitioner and patient; explanation, diagnosis and treatment of disease; the impact of modernization on non-Western medical systems, and ethnicity and health care in the US. We will examine healing methods as "ethnomedicine systems" including Western Biomedicine. Who are the curers, who are the clients? How can they be described and analyzed within a cultural context ? Are we all curers? What makes a healer powerful? We will also explore how colonization, sex, gender, ethnicity, age, religion, values, and more intersect to establish, create, and negate various healing modes and traditions within a given culture, and how systems are transposed or culturally appropriated in modern globalized society. Our exploration will include issues of the body/mind dichotomy of Western cultures and the implications that that has for "mental" illness and the Americanization of mental illness; the placebo/nocebo effect; and alternative healing methods (as complementary systems) within US culture. Guest lecturers are included for in-depth understanding of the roles of curer and client. S/U grading. Texts and Other Materials: Ethnomedicine by Pamela I Erickson (2008) Waveland Press. One other text (probably an ethnography) TBA. Readings in Canvas. Videos: Horse Boy; Placebo: Mind over Medicine; Shaman of the Andes; Sick Around the World. Class Requirements: -Attend each class (miss no more than three classes); a forth miss may result in "u" grade -Be prepared to discuss the assigned readings every class. -Be prepared with all written assignments, in a professional format (typewritten & printed or in Canvas) -Write several reflective essays during the quarter. -Experience a healing session or interview a healer and be able to write an essay based in that experience. -Create a final project or write a 10 page research paper to be presented in class at the end of the quarter.

FAIR 414D Race, Class, &Public Education

Credits: 4

Instructor: Pierce

Race, Class, and Public Education Prerequisite: Admission to Fairhaven College The public education system in the U.S. has historically been considered the great "leveling" institution--one of only places people from all racial, ethnic, and class backgrounds have the best chance of achieving "the American Dream". But what if this story about public education in the U.S. has never been true? How would we re-evaluate the public education in the U.S. if we viewed this official history against the grain, from the standpoint of communities who have systematically remained racially stigmatized and economically disadvantaged in U.S. society despite access to public education? In exploring these and related questions, this class takes a historical and philosophical approach to reassess the goals and aims of the public education system in the U.S. by drawing on the Black Radical Tradition as well as decolonial and Marxist thinkers. The primary goals of this course are twofold. First, to gain a better understanding of who the public education system in the U.S. was designed to serve and in what ways. The second goal will be to link this analysis to contemporary debates and controversies around antiblackness and education, the preservation and persistence of white supremacy U.S. society and culture, and indigenous education movements rooted in decolonial projects. The course will also focus on how marginalized communities have created and practiced resistive models of education in the U.S. that point to alternative ways of learning and being in society outside of these power dynamics.

Learning Outcomes: Ability to critically evaluate democratic assumptions of the public education system; draw connections between white supremacy, colonization, and capitalism to the design of public schooling; gain competency in areas of research such as the Black Radical Tradition and decolonial thinkers. Students will also write a research paper on a chosen topic that examines a contemporary example of colonial and racial legacies in the K-12 school system. Required Texts: TBA, most likely supplied via course Canvas page. Credit/Evaluation: Participation in class discussion and regular attendance; timely and thoughtful completion of course readings and writing assignments; quality of writing assignments that use evidence from course readings; quality of student presentations; critical and respectful engagement in class.

FAIR 432Q Ecological Restoration

Credits: 5

Instructor: Tuxill

Ecological Restoration Note: This course meets with and is taught jointly with ESCI 470 Ecological Restoration. Prereq: Fair 206A or equivalent, or permission of the instructor. Long-term solutions to contemporary environmental problems involve not just conservation of the natural world, but increasingly the restoration of ecologically healthy landscapes and communities. This course introduces students to the science and practice of restoring ecological systems. In lecture and discussion, we will examine the implications of ecological theory for understanding how natural landscapes change under the impacts of human activities. We also will review case studies where shifts in natural resource use and environmental policies have helped restore the ecological health of forests, rivers, grasslands, and other ecosystems. Students will gain practical skills by working in groups to plan and implement ecological restoration projects at a local field site. As part of the interdisciplinary focus of this course, we also will connect our scientific understanding to social meanings of ecological restoration as experienced by individuals, communities, and cultures.

 

 

Texts: Reading assignments will be drawn from scientific journals and other primary texts, and distributed via Canvas.

Credit/Evaluation: Regular attendance and informed contribution to discussions is essential. Evaluation will be based on each student's grasp and understanding of the issues presented in the readings. Students also will: 1) work in teams to research, plan, implement, and evaluate an ecological restoration project locally; 2) document their work with a written project proposal, oral presentation, and final report; and 3) complete at least 2 hours of service learning with a local conservation organization involved in ecological restoration, documented with a brief written report.