World Issues Forum Winter 2017

Next World Issues Forum Speaker

Wed 2/22 from 12:00 PM to 1:20 PM

The Standing Rock movement has become historic not only in its size and message, but in how that message was delivered. This is the first time in history that Native American people took control of their own narrative using such a massive medium as social media. Both mobile technology and social media have made it possible for Native Americans to speak directly to massive audiences worldwide and that has come with both benefits and difficulties.  

Jason Begay is an associate professor at the University of Montana School of Journalism where he teaches the Native News Honors Project, a 25-year-old endeavor in which students cover news trends throughout Montana’s seven reservations and 12 tribes. He is a 2002 graduate of the program and has written for the New York Times, the Oregonian and the Navajo Times. He is a former president of the Native American Journalists Association and board member for UNITY Journalists for Diversity.

World Issues Forum Winter 2017

Wed 1/11 from 12:00 PM to 1:20 PM

VIDEO

Since the beginning of the 21st C. there have been 56 major disasters affecting 30 countries. Almost 35,000 children died in schools in 16 of these events, many more were narrow misses.   The Asia-Pacific region is the most disaster-prone in the world, with 35.6 million children are affected every year. When disaster strikes, schools are damaged or destroyed, death and injury is common, and children miss out on school – with some never returning. The Millennium Development goal of "education for all" met school enrollment goals only to recognize that there remains a 'Global Learning Crisis' that Sustainable Development Goals must now tackle. The impact of disasters on educational inequities has not been measured.

 

Advocates in the region have had long-sponsored 'pilot programs' for to address these issues, but the process of coalition-building did not begin in earnest until 2005. Over the past ten years these efforts have moved past resistance from education sector duty-bearers, past never-sufficient humanitarian assistance, to proactive policy adoption and implementation.

 

Learn about global efforts to protect students and education systems, the efforts to promote change, and the policy trends when it comes to school safety in Asia and the Pacific. How does this link to similar problems faced closer to home?

Dr. Marla Petal is Senior Advisor for Education and Risk Reduction for Save the Children. Her education includes a Ph.D. in urban planning and MSW with focus on community organization, planning and administration.

Wed 1/18 from 12:00 PM to 1:20 PM

VIDEO

Drawing on over a decade of research conducted in various Cuban cities, Rebecca Bodenheimer will discuss regionalism in contemporary Cuban society and its manifestation in popular dance music. Her book Geographies of Cubanidad: Place, Race, and Musical Performance in Contemporary Cuba, examines the intersections of race and place in the performance of various musical genres, both popular and folkloric. While regionalism is a pervasive issue in Cuba, both historically and in the contemporary moment, it has gone largely unexplored in academic research on and off the island. However, regionalist antagonism is particularly apparent in Havana, which has been the destination of migrants from various provinces, especially from eastern Cuba.

Dr. Rebecca Bodenheimer is an ethnomusicologist and independent scholar who has conducted fieldwork in Cuba since 2004, examining the contemporary performance of rumba and a range of other Afro-Cuban folkloric and popular musical styles. Her book Geographies of Cubanidad: Place, Race, and Musical Performance in Contemporary Cuba was published in 2015 by the University Press of Mississippi. Dr. Bodenheimer received her PhD from the University of California, Berkeley in 2010.  

Wed 1/25 from 12:00 PM to 1:20 PM

CANCELED

 

 

 

 

This World Issues Forum has been canceled. Please join us for the next forum on February 1st: "Revolutionary Songs: A Centennial Celebration of the Irish Revolution of 1916"

Wed 2/1 from 12:00 PM to 1:20 PM

VIDEO

Peadar MacMahon’s performance will examine the importance and role of songs as tools in the creation of the nationalist movement in Ireland. It is hoped that those in attendance will come away with a clearer view of Irish history and an appreciation for the power of song.

 

Peadar MacMahon is a proud native of Limerick, an ancient walled city in the west of Ireland. His strength lies in his unique interpretation of historic songs. His latest project is a CD and show of the life and works of one of Ireland’s greatest songwriters, Percy French (1852-1920).

Wed 2/8 from 12:00 PM to 1:30 PM

VIDEO

 

This presentation compares two peace processes in Colombia. In the late 1950s and early 1960s, the National Front’s efforts to secure political reconciliation and prevent “another Cuba” materialized a series of social, political, and economic programs that led, perhaps as an unintended consequence of such efforts, to the emergence of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC). Two generations later, President Santos' administration and the FARC have signed a peace agreement that can potentially end the longest conflict in the hemisphere. By tracing a genealogy between these two experiences, this talk explains how the transnational meanings of “Cuba” have shaped Colombian discourses on peace, and historicizes how different actors— peasants, urban workers, middle class professionals, women, and elites—have envisioned “peaceful” societies. In so doing, it seeks to shift the register of analysis away from an assumption of peace as a transcendental solution to a violent present to a more critical interrogation of peace—as an idea, as a practice, and as a political project—through which multilayered repertoire of competing imagined societies defined by economic interests, gendered discourses, and racial categorizations have historically struggled for supremacy.

Ricardo’s teaching interests include Latin American history, world history, and histories of democracy. His research focuses on labor and class formation in modern Latin America and the Americas. He is co-editor of The Making of the Middle ClassToward a Transnational History, (Duke, 2012). He is currently working on two research projects: a history of the Peace Corps in Latin America in the 1960s and a history of the elites in Colombia during the second half of the 20th century.    

Wed 2/15 from 12:00 PM to 1:20 PM

VIDEO

What do Palestinians think about the peace process, their political realities, and about the world 20 years after the signing of the Oslo Accords? Professor Dana will highlight the results of a unique public opinion survey that he designed and implemented in the occupied Palestinian Territory of the West Bank in the summer of 2013, which corresponded with the 20th anniversary of the signing of the Oslo Accords. 

Dr. Karam Dana is a Palestinian-American academic. He is Assistant Professor of Middle East and Islamic Studies at the University of Washington Bothell. His research explores elite politics in Palestinian society in the 1920s and 1930s, and contemporary Palestinian public opinion. He also studies the political and civic engagement of Muslims in Western contexts, specifically in the United States.

Wed 2/22 from 12:00 PM to 1:20 PM

The Standing Rock movement has become historic not only in its size and message, but in how that message was delivered. This is the first time in history that Native American people took control of their own narrative using such a massive medium as social media. Both mobile technology and social media have made it possible for Native Americans to speak directly to massive audiences worldwide and that has come with both benefits and difficulties.  

Jason Begay is an associate professor at the University of Montana School of Journalism where he teaches the Native News Honors Project, a 25-year-old endeavor in which students cover news trends throughout Montana’s seven reservations and 12 tribes. He is a 2002 graduate of the program and has written for the New York Times, the Oregonian and the Navajo Times. He is a former president of the Native American Journalists Association and board member for UNITY Journalists for Diversity.

Wed 3/1 from 12:00 PM to 1:20 PM

The new Trudeau government has made a tonal shift in Canada’s international development policies. However, not unlike many governments in the overdeveloped world, Canadian policies are still used to export and embed neoliberal rationales perpetuating global inequalities that development policies are supposed to right. Mah and Rivers suggest how design and social science, together, can advance a more progressive international development agenda. They do this by highlighting their ongoing Democratic Crèche project. This sustainable development project entails the prototyping of two early childhood development (ECD) centres, or daycare centres, in South African townships. Beyond the realization of physical structures that enhance children’s wellbeing, the project ultimately demonstrates the difference made when social design is used “to do” and “to study” development in alternative and critically engaged ways. “Alternative” and “critical,” here, necessitate development policies and projects emanating as much from townships as Global North capitals.  

Kai Wood Mah is a registered architect, design historian, and professor. Patrick Lynn Rivers is a political scientist and professor at a leading school of art and design. Together, they co-direct Afield, a design research practice bringing comparative interdisciplinary perspective to contemporary social issues.