Fairhaven in the News

WWU's Richard Simon named a finalist for the PEN/Bellwether Prize for Socially Engaged Fiction

a red square on white background with the text Pen America inside of it

Richard Simon, a senior instructor in WWU's Honors Program and Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies, was recently named a finalist in the Pen America Literary Awards' Pen/Bellwether Prize for Socially Engaged Fiction for his unpublished book, "The Dolphin Ambassador's Daughter."

The PEN/Bellwether Prize for Socially Engaged Fiction is a career-founding prize, which promotes fiction that addresses issues of social justice and the impact of culture and politics on human relationships. Established by Barbara Kingsolver in 2000, it is awarded biennially to the author of a previously unpublished novel of high literary caliber that exemplifies the prize’s founding principles.

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Western Today

Gardens of Political Transformation: Indigenism, Anarchism and Feminism Embodied

abstract  painting of palm trees with Hawaiian words filling the sky

 

Latest publication by Dr. Mary Tuti Baker

Anarchist Developments in Cultural Studies, 2021.1

Abstract

Mary Tuti Baker is an Assistant Professor at Western Washington University, where she enjoys joint appointments in Canadian and American Studies, Salish Sea Studies, and at Fairhaven College. A Kanaka Maoli scholar, she earned her PhD in Political Science from the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa with specializations in Indigenous Politics and Futures Studies. Her research examines the relationship between Kanaka Maoli values and practice and the politics of decolonization.

Gardens of Political Transformation: Indigenism, Anarchism and Feminism Embodied

John Feodorov’s exhibition, “Assimilations,” at CUE Art Foundation

John Feodorov’s painting “Living Beneath a White Rainbow,” from 2020. an american flag flies upside down over a colorless rainbow and a house with a brown hand giving the thumbs up sign. the artist grandfather and mother stand in the doorway of another simple house

John Feodorov’s exhibition, “Assimilations,” at CUE Art Foundation recounts what Native Americans lost, culturally, under European colonization: language, religion and history. His crude, faux-naïve and elegantly composed paintings are the best works in the show. Enlarged family photographs and an installation with a Bible translated into Navajo, juxtaposed with a recording of the artist’s mother and grandfather singing Navajo songs, add to the overall, devastating effect.

The New York Times:  3 Art Gallery Shows to See Right Now

 

Fairhaven and the Ray Wolpow Institute to launch new Human Rights minor this fall

Faculty and students participate in a Human Rights workshop.

This fall, Western will launch a new interdisciplinary minor in Human Rights, a combined program of study offered through Fairhaven College of Interdisciplinary Studies (FCIS) and the Ray Wolpow Institute for the Study of the Holocaust, Genocide, and Crimes Against Humanity (RWI).

Read full article in Western Today

 

 

Fairhaven's Babafemi Akinrinade discusses new book on mass atrocities and international law in Africa

 

Babafemi wears a suit jacket and shirt with a colar

WWU Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies Babafemi Akinrinade recently sat down with Western Today to talk about his new book, “Atrocity Crimes, Atrocity Laws and Justice in Africa.”

Read full article in Western Today

Washington State Shows How a Truly Progressive Court Changes Everything

  

Raquel stands at a podium next to washington state Govenor Jay Inslee

This article features Washington State Supreme Court Justice and former Fairhaven College professor Raquel Montoya-Lewis. Justice Montoya-Lewis frequently visits our Law, Diversity, and Justice classes – we are grateful for her past and present involvement with the LDJ program.

 

Washington State Shows How a Truly Progressive Court Changes Everything

Mary Baker Learning and Living in Solidarity: A Conversation with/from Hawai'i

 

a hawaian beach with trees in the forground on a bright sunny day

 

 

 

Learning and Living in Solidarity: A Conversation with/from Hawai'i

This event took place on March 25th 2021 as a part of an ongoing dialogue on the meanings of solidarity and to carry forward what we planned from 2020.

The dialogue is with Dr. Noelani Goodyear-Kaʻōpua, Dr. Kyle Kajihiro, Dr. Cynthia Franklin, Dr. Candace Fujikane, and Dr. Mary Tuti Baker.

 

Learning and Living in Solidarity: A Conversation with/from Hawai'i

 

Washington state names its first Native American poet laureate

Rena  wearing dark clothes with bright pink scarf

Former Fairhaven College instructor Rena Priest has been appointed the new incoming Washington State Poet Laureate by  Governor Jay Inslee.

Priest’s literary debut, Patriarchy Blues, was honored with the 2018 American Book Award, and her most recent work is Sublime Subliminal. A member of the Lhaq’temish (Lummi) Nation, she will be the first Indigenous poet to assume the role.

Humanites.org announcement

Crosscut.com announcement

Fairhaven College alumni host weekly virtual concert series

 

one person playing the banjo next to another person playing guitar

With in-person concerts canceled, musicians turn to live streaming as way of maintaining tradition.

By Sophia Pappalau

Fairhaven College is hosting a series of weekly virtual music performances held on Facebook Live. The Fairhaven College Music Festival is an annual celebration of the musical community held at The Outback farm with performances by Fairhaven alumni. 

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