World Issues Forum Spring 2019

 Location

  Fairhaven Auditorium
  (FA 300)

Next World Issues Forum Speaker

Wed 5/1 from 12:00 PM to 1:20 PM

Dr. Katrina Jagodinsky will outline the legal codes that made Indigenous women vulnerable to economic and sexual exploitation in Washington Territory and chronicle the strategies of Salish woman Nora Jewell in overcoming her vulnerabilities as she grew up on San Juan Island and maintained family ties throughout Salish Sea and mainland communities from 1864-1910.

Katrina Jagodinsky is the Susan J. Rosowski Associate Professor of History at the University of Nebraska Lincoln, where she teaches legal and western history and is also the inaugural Jack and Nancy Farley Distinguished Visiting Scholar in History at Simon Fraser University this term. Her research highlights women’s challenges to their sexual and economic vulnerabilities in the long nineteenth century. She has published in American Indian Quarterly, Western Historical Quarterly, and Western Legal History and has chapters in books from University of California Press, the University Press of Kansas, in addition to her book Legal Codes & Talking Trees: Indigenous Women’s Sovereignty in the Sonoran and Puget Sound Borderlands, 1854-1946 (Yale University Press, 2016).

World Issues Forum Spring 2019

Wed 4/10 from 12:00 PM to 1:25 PM

PICTURE OF Sean Williams

VIDEO

Talk: Sean Williams will discuss traditional Irish song in Irish-Gaelic and English, exploring the differences within Ireland. Her talk will expand into the Irish song diaspora and its local impacts, including its presence in North America, South America, and East Asia. Williams will focus on the importance and limitations of the Irish-Gaelic repertoire in places where English prevails, and examine the ways in which language loss has implications for the diminishment of the corpus of songs.

 

Bio: Sean Williams teaches ethnomusicology and cultural studies at The Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington. Her interests include liminality, language, gender, religion, and food; she has worked with Irish, Indonesian, Brazilian and American musical genres. In addition to her articles and reviews in the field of ethnomusicology, she has written chapters on music and religion, music and revival, music and food, music and dance, and music and identity for several edited volumes. Her books include The Sound of the Ancestral Ship: Highland Music of West Java (Oxford, 2001); The Ethnomusicologists’ Cookbook (Routledge, 2006); Focus: Irish Traditional Music (Routledge, 2010); Bright Star of the West: Joe Heaney, Irish Song-Man (Oxford, 2011); The Ethnomusicologists’ Cookbook, vol. II (Routledge, 2015); and Musics of the World (Oxford, forthcoming). Her book on the Irish singer Joe Heaney won the Alan P. Merriam Prize in 2012 for the most distinguished, published English-language monograph in ethnomusicology.

 

Wed 4/17 from 12:00 AM to 1:20 PM

VIDEO

The Adventure Learning Grant gives Fairhaven College students ten months abroad in unfamiliar cultures. Sarah Sasek worked with womxn’s resistance groups in Ecuador. Claudia Rocha explored street
art in Mexico, and Meriel Kaminsky helped farmworkers organizing agroecology in Nicaragua and Honduras. Please come and learn about their experiences

Wed 4/24 from 12:00 PM to 1:20 PM

Carl Wilkens photo for publicity

VIDEO

For over a decade, Carl Wilkens has been sharing stories around the globe to inspire and equip people to “enter the world of The Other.” Wilkens will share about recent visits to Rwanda as well his personal stories from the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi. The “firing” of new brain pathways and our ability to reframe the “other” are some of the powerful tools and practices he has learned from survivors, perpetrators, and his own journey with PTSD.

Carl Wilkens is the only American who chose to stay in Kigali, Rwanda throughout the 1994 genocide. He and his Rwandan colleagues worked together to save the lives of hundreds. His harrowing yet hopeful journey weaves together stories of tremendous risk and fierce compassion in the midst of slaughter. Each year he returns to Rwanda with students and educators to see for themselves how people are working together to rebuild their country and rebuild trust.

 

Wed 5/1 from 12:00 PM to 1:20 PM

Dr. Katrina Jagodinsky will outline the legal codes that made Indigenous women vulnerable to economic and sexual exploitation in Washington Territory and chronicle the strategies of Salish woman Nora Jewell in overcoming her vulnerabilities as she grew up on San Juan Island and maintained family ties throughout Salish Sea and mainland communities from 1864-1910.

Katrina Jagodinsky is the Susan J. Rosowski Associate Professor of History at the University of Nebraska Lincoln, where she teaches legal and western history and is also the inaugural Jack and Nancy Farley Distinguished Visiting Scholar in History at Simon Fraser University this term. Her research highlights women’s challenges to their sexual and economic vulnerabilities in the long nineteenth century. She has published in American Indian Quarterly, Western Historical Quarterly, and Western Legal History and has chapters in books from University of California Press, the University Press of Kansas, in addition to her book Legal Codes & Talking Trees: Indigenous Women’s Sovereignty in the Sonoran and Puget Sound Borderlands, 1854-1946 (Yale University Press, 2016).

Wed 5/8 from 12:00 PM to 1:20 PM

The idea of freedom contributes to climate change, as it insists that people are free to use and control natural resources however they want.  This presentation will argue that different understandings of freedom, which connect humans to nature in less dominating ways, offer new possibilities for challenging climate change. It will offer wild and surprising sites for reimagining freedom today: in human guts, household dust, drought planes, and environmental pollution sites.

Elisabeth Anker is an Associate Professor of American Studies and Political Science at the George Washington University. She is the author of Orgies of Feeling: Melodrama and the Politics of Freedom (Duke, 2014), which was a finalist for the Lora Romero Prize for the Best First Book in American Studies.  She is currently working on two books: Ugly Freedoms and The Wrath of Sovereignty. 

Wed 5/22 from 12:00 PM to 1:20 PM

“Attorney Carlos Spector will examine generally how extortions, kidnappings, and human rights violations in Mexico by authorized crime displaces Mexican
citizens resulting in their fleeing to the United States in search of political asylum. He will also discuss how the U.S. asylum legal framework tends to reinforce the
widespread misconception that such crimes do not occur and that the Mexican government is able and willing to control said organized crime. Additionally,
it will be argued that the 90% denial rate of Mexican asylum claims is rooted in the history of U.S. asylum law, foreign policy, and fluid domestic considerations.
The presentation will focus upon the experience of Mexican asylum seekers in the El Paso, Texas area from 2008-2017.”
 

Wed 5/29 from 12:00 PM to 1:20 PM

Aaron Sheehan-Dean picture

The US Civil War is sometimes remembered as the last “gentlemen’s war” of the nineteenth century and sometimes remembered as the first terrible modern war.  In fact, it was both these things at once, a restrained and just war and a bloody and indiscriminate one.  Even with 750,000 dead, the Civil War could have been much worse. Military forces on both sides sought to contain casualties inflicted on soldiers and civilians. In Congress, in church pews, and in letters home, Americans debated the conditions under which lethal violence was legitimate, and their arguments differentiated carefully among victims—women and men, black and white, enslaved and free. Sometimes these well-meaning restraints led to more carnage by implicit­ly justifying the killing of people who were not protected by the laws of war. As the Civil War raged on, the Union’s confrontations with guerrillas and the Confederacy’s confrontations with black soldiers forced a new reckoning with traditional categories of lawful combat­ants and raised legal disputes that still hang over military operations around the world today.  The conflict raises important questions for us about how democracies wage war. 

 

Aaron Sheehan-Dean is the Fred C. Frey Professor of Southern Studies at Louisiana State University and the chairman of the History Department.  He teaches courses on nineteenth-century U.S. history, the Civil War and Reconstruction, and Southern History.  He is the author of The Calculus of Violence: How Americans Fought the Civil War, Why Confederates Fought: Family and Nation in Civil War Virginia, Concise Historical Atlas of the U.S. Civil War, and is the editor of several books.