Urban Land Knowledge: Reflecting on Stories of Place

 

Zoom meeting: https:////wwu-edu.zoom.us/j/97866362611?pwd=UVFFTUVlbCtaQ0VWNzlPcDRjQ3VUZz09

 

What stories are told about the urbanized lands so many of us on this continent inhabit? What do the dominant narratives tell us about how things came to be, who is in charge, who the city is for? Colonial narratives in North American cities continue to overwrite Indigenous people’s laws, jurisdiction, knowledge systems, governance systems. Proud pioneer tales and mythologies of progress leave out the harms and violations of settler colonialism embedded into our cities and normalize assumptions about who has authority, voice, and the power to make places. In this talk, Métis-Cree community planner and filmmaker Kamala Todd shares her own cultural teachings and place-based learnings from growing up in the territories of the hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ and Skwxwú7mesh-speaking people (aka Vancouver), and working as a community planner, filmmaker, and educator. For those whose ancestors are elsewhere, what are our responsibilities to the Indigenous lands we occupy and make decisions for? How can we become better at listening to the land languages, stories, and relationships that belong to the lands we call home? How can we practice gratitude, humility, reciprocity and contribute to decolonizing our cities with ethical relationality and care? 

Colonial narratives in North American cities overwrite Indigenous people’s laws, jurisdiction, knowledge systems, and governance systems. Métis-Cree community planner and filmmaker Kamala Todd shares her own cultural teachings and place-based learnings from growing up in the territories of the hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ and Skwxwú7mesh-speaking people (aka Vancouver), and working as a community planner, filmmaker, and educator. For those whose ancestors are elsewhere, what are our responsibilities to the Indigenous lands we occupy and make decisions for?  How can we practice gratitude, humility, reciprocity and contribute to decolonizing our cities with ethical relationality and care? 

Speaker Name

Kamala Todd

Date

Quarter

Spring

Speaker Bio

Kamala Todd is a Métis-Cree mother, community planner, filmmaker, and educator born and raised in the beautiful lands of the hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ and Skwxwú7mesh-speaking people (also known as Vancouver). She has a Masters degree in urban Geography (UBC). Kamala was the City of Vancouver’s first Indigenous Arts and Culture Planner and she was also the City's Aboriginal Social Planner for several years. She is an adjunct professor at UBC and SFU. Kamala's media production company is Indigenous City Media, where she writes, directs, and edits. Her film credits include Welcome to Our Homelands, Indigenous Plant Diva, Cedar and Bamboo, RELAW: Living Indigenous Laws, and Sharing our Stories: the Vancouver Dialogues Project. Kamala also writes for television, including Nehiyawetan and Coyote Science (APTN). She wrote the report Truth-telling: Indigenous perspectives on working with municipal governments for the Vancouver Park Board and she co-authored the City of Vancouver's culture plan, Culture|Shift: Blanketing the city in arts and culture.